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Art & Design

Bachelor of Fine Arts

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)

The Department of Art & Design’s bachelor of fine arts (BFA) 87-credit program is for students who want to become professional artists and who wish to pursue their specific professional goals within the stimulating intellectual climate of Rutgers University. The education offered by Mason Gross School of the Arts differs from an art school program that focuses exclusively on studio skills. At Mason Gross, studios and seminar discussions together confront students with a wide range of techniques, materials, visual languages, and cultural issues. Creation and critical analysis go hand in hand. 

BFA Coursework 

Foundation Courses

Work toward the BFA degree starts with foundation courses that introduce the techniques and materials as well as the artistic and cultural questions of contemporary practice. Intermediate and advanced courses provide specific training in the area of concentration. Studies culminate in the final year BFA thesis exhibition in the Mason Gross Galleries. 

All BFA students are required to take four 4-credit foundation courses in studio, each covering two semesters. Students are expected to complete their foundation courses within the first year of study.

Studio Electives

Studio electives can be taken in any Art & Design discipline and may be related to the chosen concentration. There are also several 3-credit cross-listed courses offered elsewhere in the university that can be taken as studio electives. 

Seminar Course

Students must complete a seminar course in their chosen concentration. This enhances the student’s historical knowledge of their chosen concentration. 

Thesis and Exhibition

In the senior year, BFA students take a two-semester “Thesis and Exhibition” course (part A in fall term, part B in the spring term). The fall semester of thesis enables students to place their studio work within the context of contemporary issues in art and design, and to consider their own work in the setting of a public exhibition. During the spring semester of thesis year, students work in groups to plan, organize, publicize, install and de-install the BFA thesis exhibitions in the Mason Gross Galleries. 

BFA in Visual Arts 

For the BFA in visual arts, students choose a concentration in one of six areas: drawing, media, painting, photography, print, and sculpture. Students take three year-long, two-semester studio courses and complete a 3-credit seminar within their chosen concentration area. Students declare their concentration by the end of the second year of study, at their sophomore review or at their transfer review, usually in December of their first term at Mason Gross. Students may opt to double concentrate or do a hybrid concentration with approval by two faculty members and guidance of the undergraduate advisor.

Students are required to take one art history or critical studies elective as a requirement toward the BFA major. This elective should be carefully chosen to enhance their knowledge of their chosen concentration.

“Visual Arts Practice” involves supervised practical experience within the Department of Art & Design studios, computer or photography labs, galleries, or on specific projects outside of the department. One credit is given for 42 hours of practice (on average 3 hours/week) and is graded as Pass/No Credit. Students arrange their visual arts practice with both the practice supervisor and department administrator.

Students explore drawing as a discipline with its own history, traditions, and materials, as well as one where boundaries are fluid enough to include the diverse media and conceptual approaches embraced in contemporary practice. Emphasis is placed on students developing personal visual languages with which to explore their interests and goals as artists in the 21st century. 

Faculty
Julie Langsam
Associate Professor
Art & Design
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Through creative exploration of video, audio, animation, interactivity, and art for the web as well as installation and performance, students in the media program develop a strong foundation in technical proficiency in the context of historical and theoretical research in technology, art, and contemporary culture. Media graduates will be able to enter a diversity of professional fields as they maximize their artistic potential and become creative problem solvers. 

Faculty
Natalie Bookchin
Graduate Director, Professor
Art & Design
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Damian Catera
Media Specialist
Art & Design
Arts Online
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Steffani Jemison
Assistant Professor
Art & Design
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The painting curriculum is structured around a deep and rigorous engagement with the practice of painting. Students are challenged to explore the interwoven historical, material, formal, and conceptual aspects of the medium. Drawing on a range of technical approaches and historical models, including its relationship to other art forms, students are immersed in painting culture to develop and strengthen their individual artistic voices. 

Faculty
Marc Handelman
Department Chair, Associate Professor
Art & Design
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Hanneline Røgeberg
Professor
Art & Design
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Stephen Westfall
Undergraduate Director, Professor
Art & Design
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Through the study of photographic technique, the history of photography, and the critique of images, the photography curriculum emphasizes development of a personal voice. In the first year, students are introduced to photography through 35mm, 4×5, and other film cameras and the analog darkroom. The second year is devoted to digital photography, and the third year concentrates on portfolio development and preparation for the thesis exhibition. Optional advanced courses enable students to expand their practice of photography. 

Faculty
Miranda Lichtenstein
Associate Professor in Photography
Art & Design
Adam Putnam
Photo Lecturer
Art & Design
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Students in the print program explore a full range of printmaking processes including silkscreen, woodcut, linocut, reduction printing, intaglio, lithography, digital printing, and letterpress as well as paper making and creating handmade books. Students study the history of print, paper, collaboration, and criticism. Courses encourage students to combine print mediums, and artistic development is addressed through individual and group critiques and the collaborative studio. 

Faculty
Barbara Madsen
Director of the Rutgers Printmaking Collaborative
Art & Design
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Didier William
Assistant Professor of Expanded Print
Art & Design
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The sculpture program is devoted to the process of developing three-dimensional forms through the use of traditional and nontraditional materials. Curriculum and coursework are designed to provide students with a strong foundation in a range of technical skills and processes and to challenge more advanced students to develop their own personal voice. Emphasis is placed within the context of contemporary art practice and in recognition of historical developments. 

Faculty
Heather Hart
Sculpture Lecturer
Art & Design
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Jeanine Oleson
Assistant Professor, Sculpture
Art & Design
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Patrick Strzelec
Associate Professor
Art & Design
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BFA in Design

Design studies at Mason Gross School of the Arts are grounded in graphic design and interaction design, reflecting the rapidly evolving nature of visual communication and technology. Students gain expertise in developing innovative ways of communicating ideas in a wide range of concrete and dynamic media. They acquire skills in typography, publication design, coding, and data visualization, while shaping content and form in both speculative and real-world situations. 

The program encourages experimentation and a critical engagement with contemporary culture, equipping students for a lifetime of practice as digital and/or print designers. The curriculum prepares graduates to contribute to shaping the future direction of design. For design students, a capstone course will require students to shape a body of self-initiated work in their final year that becomes public, whether in the form of website, book, an app, or other appropriate format. 

Concentration Requirements (87 credits) 

  • Foundation studio requirements (16 credits)
  • Concentration courses (40 credits)
    • Studio courses (24)
    • Two seminars in design (6)
    • Design practicum or internship (4)
    • Thesis A and Thesis B (6)
  • Studio electives (31 credits)

Design studio courses emphasize context and audience in formats including posters, books, identities, mobile applications, and websites. 

In upper-level courses, students undertake real-world assignments that hone their sense of design in the everyday via an internship or practicum. Technically, students develop a grasp of the limitations and possibilities of a wide range of software and hardware. Seminar courses promote an understanding of design history and key issues and debates in contemporary practice. 

Students are required to take one additional academic elective (3 credits) chosen from a list of university courses, provided by the design faculty and relevant to design study or to a student’s interest area, such as The Structure of Information [04:189:152], Social Media and Participatory Culture [04:567:275], Architectural Design [11:550:133], Media and Popular Culture [04:567:333]. View a full list of liberal arts requirements for BFA design students. 

Atif Akin
Associate Professor
Art & Design
Arts Online
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Gerry Beegan
Associate Professor
Art & Design
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Mindy Seu
Assistant Professor
Art & Design
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Jacqueline Thaw
MFA in Design Director, Associate Professor
Art & Design
Community Arts
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