Music

Courses

07:700:100 Fundamentals of Aural Skills

Fundamentals of Aural Skills

Course Number: 07:700:100
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Intended for first-year Mason Gross music majors who did not place into Music Theory I and/or Aural Skills I. The course covers fundamentals of written music theory and ear-training skills including note reading, key signatures, major and minor scales, intervals, solfege, and melodic and rhythmic dictation.3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

This course covers three main areas: rhythm reading and conducting, tonal melody singing, and dictation.

Conducting: Students will be able to conduct in all simple meters and in 6/8 (without beat subdivision) while performing prepared rhythm and singing exercise and while sight reading rhythm and singing exercises.

Rhythm: Students will be able to immediately recognize and be able to notate and echo back with correct counting syllables all single-beat rhythm patterns with up to 1st level beat subdivisions in all simple meters and up to 2nd level beat subdivisions in 6/8.

  • Students will be able to recite prepared rhythm exercises at the indicated tempi and sight read rhythm exercises using counting syllables in all simple meters and 6/8 with ties, dotted notes/rests and with up to 1st level subdivision of the beat in all simple meters and with up to 2nd level subdivision of the beat in 6/8.

Singing: Students will be able to sing tonal patterns from memory using movable-Do solfege at the prescribed tempi.

  • When given a key signature (major or minor), students will be able to hear a short melodic fragment no more than twice and immediately identify the tonality and tonic and correctly notate the fragment (treble and bass clef) and/or echo it back with correct solfege.
  • Students will be able to sing prepared melodies at the indicated tempi and sight read melodies using movable-Do solfege in treble and bass clef in all simple meters and 6/8 with ties, dotted notes/rests and with up to 1st level subdivision of the beat in all simple meters and with up to 2nd level subdivision of the beat in 6/8. Melodies will be primarily conjunct but may include leaps between notes of the tonic triad.

Dictation: Students will be able to notate with only one hearing all simple meter, single-element rhythm cells both with and without ties and all simple meter mixed element rhythm cells without ties.

  • Students will be able to notate rhythm recitations that are 8-16 mm in all simple meters, containing rests, ties, dotted notes and up to 1st level beat subdivisions with no more than one hearing per 1.5 measures.
  • Students will be able to notate with only one hearing most compound meter, single-element rhythm with up to 2nd level subdivision of the beat.
  • Students will be able to notate rhythm recitations that are 8-12 mm in 6/8 and that contain rests, ties, dotted notes and up to 2nd level beat subdivisions with no more than one hearing per 1.5 measures.
  • Students will be able to notate in treble and bass clef 8-12 mm tonal melodies in all major keys with not more than one hearing per 1.5 measures. Melodies will be primarily conjunct but may also include leaps between notes of the tonic triad.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Studying Rhythm by Anne Hall and Timothy Urban. (2018: Pearson, 4th edition)
  • All other course materials will be provided.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Attendance and Participation Requirements:

  • Attending class promptly and regularly is essential to developing solid comprehension and mastery of the skills required in this course. Attendance will be taken every day and it is assumed that all students will participate in all class activities to the best of their ability at all times with an attitude that is receptive to learning. The course grade will be lowered by one level (e.g. from a B to a C+) for each unexcused absence over 3. Students with a total of 6 or more absences a term (regardless of their category: from excessive late arrivals, unexcused or excused) will receive an F in the course. If you have accumulated more than 6 absences before the withdrawal deadline (around midterms) it is advised you withdraw from the course to avoid receiving an F.

Homework: Assignments will be given daily. Students are expected to have all assignments prepared. The instructor may require submission of audio/video files of some assignments either through Canvas.

Timed Quizzes: There will be several short, on-line timed quizzes covering note names/identification, intervals (identification/construction), scales (construction/identification), key signatures (identification/construction), diatonic triads (recognition/construction). These quizzes may be taken as many times as needed but failure to achieve the minimum required score for more than two quizzes will result in a lowering of the semester grade by one increment (e.g. from a B to a C+) and may make you ineligible to take MUS121 Music Theory 1 and MUS123 Aural Skills I.

Grading: The course covers four main content areas: written theory, rhythm reading, tonal melody reading, and dictation: students must have a grade of 70% or higher in all four areas to receive a passing grade.

Instructor: Timothy Urban, turban@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:101 Intro to Music I

Intro to Music I

Course Number: 07:700:101

For students with little or no background in music. Basic concepts for intelligent listening to all kinds of music. Emphasis on aspects of sonority, rhythm, melody, harmony, and structure.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

07:700:102 Intro to Music History

Intro to Music History

Course Number: 07:700:102

Introductory historical survey of styles, genres, forms, and composers in music from antiquity to the present.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:101 or 103 or equivalent

07:700:103 Introduction to Music Theory

Introduction to Music Theory

Course Number: 07:700:103

Rudiments of music: intervals, scales, key signatures, modes, chords, rhythm, and meter. Development of aural skills.

No previous musical experience required. Intended for nonmajors.

3 credit(s)

07:700:104 Intro to Music Analysis

Intro to Music Analysis

Course Number: 07:700:104

Exploration of basic analytical techniques that reveal principles of musical structure; examples drawn from the medieval period through the 20th century; introduction to various types of music notation and score reading; further development of aural skills.

Intended for non-majors.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:103 or equivalent

07:700:105 Making Music With Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio

Making Music With Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio

Course Number: 07:700:105
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Making Music with Computers is an introduction to computer music technology with a focus on creative composition projects. This course is designed to deepen your creative and critical approach to music composition while building a solid foundation for working with digital audio. We will integrate studies in electronic music theory and history, digital signal processing (DSP), performance practice, and aesthetics.

Topics include acoustics, principles of classic synthesis, sound design for video, basic mixing, and an introduction to MIDI. You will gain hands-on experience in soundfile editing, DSP techniques, and working with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). Primary software tools include Audacity and Cubase Elements.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Develop a compositional practice with a focus on creativity and experimentation. We will regularly workshop projects for peer and instructor feedback through the discussion forum.
  • Engage concepts from electronic music history, repertoire, and current trends through listening and analysis. We will also examine the compositional processes of seasoned composers.
  • Develop useful techniques for recording, modifying, and mixing sound through diverse software tools. We will practice these skills through technical and creative exercises.
  • Sharpen listening skills and broaden aural perspective through analysis and discussion of a variety of electronic music examples.
  • Think independently about music, articulate your thoughts, and a have a heightened awareness of how technical and musical elements function together in electronic music.
  • Build a portfolio of original compositions and gain practice presenting and discussing your work in a public forum.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Cubase Elements Software

Instructor: Gregg Rossetti, gjr63@rutgers.edu

07:700:121 Theory I

Theory I

Course Number: 07:700:121

Model counterpoint and introduction to tonal harmony. For students intending to major in music.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Demonstrated understanding by entrance examination of rhythmic/pitch notation, intervals, scales, and key signatures. Corequisites: 07:700:123, 127.

07:700:123 Aural Skills I

Aural Skills I

Course Number: 07:700:123

Intensive work in sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; score reading; and keyboard harmony.

For students intending to major in music.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:121, 122

07:700:122 Theory II

Theory II

Course Number: 07:700:122

Tonal harmony through modulation.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:121

07:700:124 Aural Skills II

Aural Skills II

Course Number: 07:700:124

Intensive work in sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; score reading; and keyboard harmony.

For students intending to major in music.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:121, 122

07:700:125 Survey Jazz Styles

Survey Jazz of Styles

Course Number: 07:700:125
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Historical and analytical survey of major jazz recordings from the 1920s to the present. Intended for Mason Gross jazz studies majors.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisite: 07:700:121

Learning Goals of Course: This course is designed as an overview of jazz styles and periods: jazz precursors, early jazz, swing, bebop, cool, third stream, hard bop, free jazz, jazz-fusion, jazz neoclassicism, and other contemporary jazz trends. The emphasis is not simply a history of jazz, but the application – familiarity with the aural characteristics associated with the various jazz styles and periods and an ability to recognize and identify recordings of key jazz musicians throughout the music’s history. At the completion of the course, students will possess an essential jazz vocabulary demanded by every aspiring and professional musician. An understanding of music theory and terminology is not required but encouraged.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Jazz Styles – History and Analysis 10th Edition by Mark C Gridley, ISBN 0-13-600589-6

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance/Participation – 25%
  • Assignments and Homework – 25%
  • Exams – 50%
07:700:127 Introduction to Music Technology

Introduction to Music Technology

Course Number: 07:700:127
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

This course explores the relationship between music and technology in a broad range of historical and contemporary applications. By developing practical and creative skills with a variety of hardware and software tools, students will learn how to use technology to further their own musicality.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:121, 123
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Understanding the historical relationship between music and technology
  • Understanding the technology available to musicians today
  • Developing practical skills in the following areas:
  • Technological “self-help”
  • Recording
  • Editing/Processing
  • Notation Software
  • Virtual Instruments
  • Developing a creative approach to music technology

Instructor: Gregg Rossetti, gjr63@rutgers.edu

07:700:128 Music Education Technology

Music Education Technology

Course Number: 07:700:128
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Music Education Technology is a hands-on activity class that incorporates music and technology skills to prepare future music educators for the modern 21st-century learning environment. Students will develop a proficiency using technology driven music software and hardware that will extend into real world situations guided by the recent National Core Arts Standards of Creating, Responding, Producing, and Connecting. For students intending to major in music education.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:121, 123
Learning Goals of Course

After completing the Music Education Technology course students will be able to:

  • Understand and demonstrate the ability to set up basic PA audio systems, working with mixing boards, connecting various cables, and handling microphones.
  • Demonstrate a basic ability with Digital Audio Workstations to record, edit, and mix both audio and MIDI tracks.
  • Create projects using digital tools that are appropriate for elementary and secondary school levels.
  • Import MIDI files created in notation programs to be used inside a Digital Audio Workstation.
07:700:131 Introduction to Music Online

Introduction to Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:131
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is divided into three sections. The first covers the fundamentals of music, including sound production, common instruments, the basics of music notation, basic musical materials such as scales and chords, and examines the variety of musical textures. The second section focuses on the way that these materials can be organized including form. The last section focuses on music of other cultures and on ways in which music is used around us, for example, in film and TV, advertisement, cartoons, and in shaping our beliefs. Despite the emphasis on organization and style, there is also a historical component to help the student understand the context of the music he hears and the reasons for change. The course is not limited to classical music, but includes popular styles among the examples. The course is media rich and contains some interactive features.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

  • Develop general scholastic skills such as critical thinking, reading, writing, and listening
  • Develop the ability to articulately express opinions in writing, with an emphasis on clarity, persuasion, coherence, and the incorporation of relevant outside sources
  • Develop strong organizational and study skills
  • Consider the cultural and social significance of music in selected historical and geographic cultures
  • Consider specific aspects of both notated and non-notated musical traditions by engaging with outside fields of history, anthropology, and philosophy
  • Develop a basic knowledge of music notation, fundamentals of music theory, and musical instruments
  • Develop familiarity with some representative composers, musicians, and musical works from selected traditions
  • Distinguish significant style features of various historical periods of Western classical music and selected modern musics

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Analyze musical language and discuss features of the music;
  • Relate music to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies;
  • Develop opinions on musical issues and express these with clarity and accuracy.

CORE Curriculum Learning Goals met by this course: Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies (AHp).

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading is based on small homework assignments (25%), two papers (25%), participation in discussion boards (10%), and two exams (40%).

Instructors: Solomon Guhl-Miller, sguhl1@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Myjunglin Oh, mo441@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Rachel Lansang, rlb239@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Jaclyn Moldawsky, jmm992@rutgers.edu

07:700:133 Introduction to Music Theory Online

Intended for students with little or no musical background. As a result, no previous musical experience is required. This course covers the rudiments of music, including pitch, duration, scales, keys, intervals, meter, rhythm and other related areas.

This course may be used to satisfy the theory requirement for the music minor.

3 credits

Note: Students will not receive credit for both Introduction to 07:700:133 and 07:700:103. Students who have successfully completed 121, 122, 221, or 222 may not take this course. SAS Core Code: Critical Creative Expression (AHr)

07:700:134 Introduction to Music Theory Online Short Course

This is a compressed, 2-credit course.

This course is intended for students with little or no musical background. As a result, no previous musical experience is required. This course covers the rudiments of music, including pitch, duration, scales, keys, intervals, meter, rhythm and other related areas.

This course may be used to satisfy the theory requirement for the music minor.

2 Credits

Note: Students may receive credit for only one of the following: 07:700:134, 07:700:133 and 07:700:103.

07:700:135 Making Music with Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio Online

Making Music with Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio Online

Course Number: 07:700:135
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is an introduction to computer music technology with a focus on creative composition projects. This course is designed to deepen your creative and critical approach to music composition while building a solid foundation for working with digital audio. Topics include acoustics, sound design for video, basic mixing, and an introduction to MIDI. You will gain hands-on experience in sound file editing, DSP techniques, and working with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW).

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Compose original music using computer music technology by integrating digital audio techniques with the ability to intelligently analyze, interpret, and describe electronic music.
  • Demonstrate development of a personal compositional style with a focus on creativity and experimentation. We will complete digital audio assignments and well-crafted compositions while regularly workshop projects for peer and instructor feedback in the Listening Room modules.
  • Apply digital audio techniques for modifying and mixing sound using diverse software tools. We will develop these skills through completion of technique-focused software exercises.
  • Integrate concepts from electronic music history, repertoire, and current trends through assignments that sharpen listening skills and broaden aural perspective. We will analyze, interpret, and describe musical materials in a wide variety of classic and contemporary electronic music examples.
  • Articulate independent thinking about music and explain how technical and musical elements work together in electronic music.
  • Apply music industry experience by using online distribution channels (YouTube) to present your original work.
  • Build a portfolio of original compositions and effectively present and discuss your work in a public forum.
  • Identify yourself as a developing artist and recognize responsibilities of artists in our society by participating in the creative process and engaging in dialogue with the artistic community created by students in the course.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: There is no textbook for the course, but you will need the following materials:

  • Purchase Cubase Elements 11 (Links to an external site.) for the educational price of $66.99 (download version).Please note that it may take several days to verify your ID and complete the order, so plan ahead.
  • A purchased, licensed version of Cubase Elements is required for the course. You will be asked to demonstrate that you own a license to Cubase Elements 10. The instructor is not able to provide assistance on unlicensed copies of the software.
  • Install the following free software: Audacity: http://audacityteam.org/ (Links to an external site.)
  • A pair of headphones to plug into your computer or audio interface
  • An external hard drive or jump drive to which to back up your work. Storage space of 32GB is recommended.

The MUS 135 course contains online units and lessons with supplementary audio and video, software lessons, technical drills, composition assignment, and a listening response activity. Homework assignments and quizzes take place online. We share will share our creative projects online and discuss using the discussion modules. Interaction with professor Hsu occurs through email.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

We will complete a variety of assignments and projects outlined below. Please refer to each assignment for submission guidelines.

Type Points/Percentage

  • Quality of Participation and Peer Feedback in Listening Rooms 10%
  • Assignments 20%
  • "Studio Time" Projects 25%
  • Quizzes 20%
  • Final Project (YouTube Comments 2% Project 23%) 25%
  • TOTAL100%

Instructor: Aurie Hsu, ahsu@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:153 Advanced Aural Skills I

Advanced Aural Skills I

Course Number: 07:700:153

Intended for first-year Mason Gross music majors and non-majors who demonstrate a solid background in basic theory, strong aural skills and the desire to maximize all facets of their musicianship . To be eligible for this course, students must score above 90% in all areas (listening, singing, rhythm reading) of the aural skills placement test. Aural Skills I introduces Movable-Do solfege, single-line and two-part tonal melodic singing of melodies with skips within the tonic and dominant triads, rhythm reading using Takadimi and dictation (melodic and rhythmic). In addition, Advanced Aural Skills I includes sing-and-play assignments, two- and three-part rhythm performance exercises, two-part rhythm and melodic dictation, as well as four-part harmonic dictation.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:121-122

07:700:221 Theory III

Theory III

Course Number: 07:700:221

Chromatic harmony of the 18th century.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:121,122; or equivalent

07:700:223 Aural Skills III

Aural Skills III

Course Number: 07:700:223

Intended for Mason Gross music majors and qualified non-majors who have already completed Aural Skills II. Aural Skills III will continue using alto and tenor clef, introduce melodies with syncopated rhythms, triplets and duplets, introduce rhythm exercises that use triplets and duplets, shifts between simple and compound meter with either the beat or division constant, and four-against-three. Dictation exams will cover this material as well as harmonic dictations that include longer progressions combining all the harmonic idioms previously learned as well as introduce short progressions with secondary function chords. In addition, Aural Skills III will introduce simple sing-and-play exercises in which students play one line on the piano while simultaneously singing a second line.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:221-222 or permission of instructor

07:700:224 Aural Skills IV

Aural Skills IV

Course Number: 07:700:224

Intended for Mason Gross music majors and qualified non-majors who have already completed Aural Skills III, Aural Skills IV introduces tonal melodies with increasing chromaticism, modulation to other closely related keys, use of triplets, duplets, and hemiola, changing meter, additive meters, meters with notes other than the quarter/dotted-quarter as the beat unit; rhythm exercises using asymmetric beat divisions (quintuplets, septuplets both at the beat and beat division level), asymmetric meters and changing asymmetric meters. Students will also be introduced to chromatic Fixed-Do and apply it to simple atonal melodies. Harmonic dictations will continue to focus on chromatic harmonies and will also introduce modulation to closely related keys. Sing-and-Play exercises will continue to focus on two-part exercises in treble and bass clef but with increased use of diatonic leaps and greater rhythmic independence of the two lines.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:221-222 or permission of instructor

07:700:230 Music in Film Online

Music in Film Online

Course Number: 07:700:230
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course examines music created for film from both historical and analytical perspectives. The objective is to establish an appreciation for the art of film music, to understand its nature and requirements, and to study the composers and directors who work in the medium. Topics studied will include the functions of the film score, aesthetics, the film industry, synchronization, the early sound film, the rise of the symphonic film score, and composers from the 1930s to the present.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Students will cultivate musical perception—developing the ability to discern the function of music in film, the relationship of composers and directors as the work together, as well as, the particular musical characteristics of preeminent film composers past and present. Students will identify various film composers, musical styles, historical relationships, film genres, narrative structure, use of music, cinematic devices such as motives, etc. Students will gain an understanding of the operational aspects of the industry and the resulting development of music written for the movies over the past 100 years.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  1. Develop a musical perception—with the ability to discern the function of music in film.
  2. Acquire an understanding of the operational aspects of the industry and the resulting development of music written for the movies over the past 100 years.
  3. Students would be able to critically evaluate the relationship between the visual and aural dimensions of film.

Goals will be assessed through tests, threaded discussions, one final project, essays and analytical papers.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments

  • Discussion Forum (2 points per Unit) = 28 points
  • Essays (2) = 15 points each
  • Final presentation (1)= 12 points.
  • Exams (2): Mid Term= 15 points, Final Exam= 15 points

Instructor: Joseph Turrin, jturrin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:233 American Popular Song Online

American Popular Song Online

Course Number: 07:700:233
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

An overview of American popular song from the arrival of the earliest Europeans through the 1970s. It examines the melding of European and African musical cultures in the 19th century to create a true American style, then traces the various styles and genres that evolved from the 19th century and those who created them.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Identify musical styles and genres in American music between the American Revolution and the 1970s according to their musical features using the basic technical terminology and pattern-types of musical organization, including elements of harmony, scale, meter, orchestration, and form
  • Recognize and identify the ways in which American popular music of the past 50 years employs the musical elements and genres of American music written between the Revolution and 1970
  • Demonstrate an ability to listen critically to a wide range of culturally diverse musical styles and practices of the present day and the historical past.
  • Distinguish different kinds of musical form and practice as reflections of class, culture, and social interaction among performers and listeners.
  • Recognize how social, political, religious, and cultural needs shaped American music in a process of historical evolution.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

There are a total of 500 points in this course. Extra points may be earned by participating in the forum (maximum 30) and an optional Concert Report (Blog) (maximum 15)

  • Exams (4): 100 points each/20% each
  • Semester Presentation (1):100 points/20%
  • Discussion Forums: up to 30 extra points (.4 maximum points per post)
  • Optional Concert Blog: up to 15 extra points

Instructor: Solomon Guhl-Miller, sguhl1@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:234 From Jazz to Hip Hop: African American Music in the 20th Century Online

From Jazz to Hip Hop: African American Music in the 20th Century Online

Course Number: 07:700:234
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

From Jazz to Hip Hop is designed as an exploration of the relationships between jazz and other African American musical traditions from early 1900s to the present, including blues, R&B, rock, soul and hip hop. The course focuses on the development, evolution, influence and issues of jazz music in America, an exploration that starts with the ephemeral roots of popular African American music in the folk and religious music of the 1800s.

Special attention will be paid to the roles jazz and jazz musicians have played in black popular music and the means by which jazz has helped inform the development of popular American musical styles.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Goals:

  • To understand the historical development of a wide array of African American popular music making traditions and evaluate the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of these 20th century musical genres.
  • To develop active/critical listening skills in order to classify sound recordings relevant to the course materials by (sub)genre and likely provenance while making inferences as to the work’s social function and cultural significance.

Course Objectives:

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which African American popular music (broadly defined) developed and evaluate how such extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of the genre.
  • Analyze jazz, blues, R&B, soul, hip-hop and related recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and likely historical period.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

List and describe each assignment below.

  • Song Presentation Assignment - Two-three paragraph personal reflection about a course-related song of your choosing. This project doubles as an introduction to uploading media in the Canvas Learning Management System
  • Artist Profile Project - An online artist profile of the course-related artist of your choice. The project includes a researched historical overview/critique of a musician/group and a song/album analysis.
  • Two Exams - held at the conclusion of units 5 & 9
  • Discussion Forum Posts - Contribute to required discussion forums in units 2-7 and 9.

Final Grade Calculation

  • 50 points / 9.1% Song Presentation
  • 150 points / 27.3% Artist Profile
  • 100 points / 18.2% Exam 1
  • 100 points / 18.2% Exam 2
  • 150 points / 27.3% Discussion Forums
  • 550 points / 100%TOTAL

Instructor: Sean Lorre, sjlorre@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:235 Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online

Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online

Course Number: 07:700:235
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

How does a musical genre such as rock become a cultural force bringing about social, sartorial, and political change? How does our sense of identity—race, gender, class, etc.—influence the music we listen to? What roles do technology and commerce play in shaping local and global ideas of popular music? In short, how and why did rock ‘n’ roll transform the world?

This class broadly explores the history of rock music from a wide array of perspectives, covering the period from its early beginnings to rockabilly, soul, metal, punk, and many other subgenres throughout the second half of the 20th century.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goals:

  • To understand the historical development of rock 'n' roll and evaluate the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of one of the most popular and influential musical genres of the twentieth century.
  • To develop active/critical listening skills in order to classify rock and pre-rock recordings by (sub)genre and likely provenance while making inferences as to the work’s social function and cultural significance.

Course Objectives:
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which rock 'n' roll (broadly defined) developed and evaluate how such extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of the genre.
  • Analyze pre-rock, rock 'n' roll and related recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and likely historical period.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments

  • Song Presentation Assignment - Two-three paragraph personal reflection about a rock-related song of your choosing. This project doubles as an introduction to uploading media in the Canvas Learning Management System
  • Artist Profile Project - An online artist profile of the rock or rock-related artist of your choice. The project includes a researched historical overview/critique of a musician/group and a song/album analysis.
  • Two Exams - held at the conclusion of units 4 and 8
  • Discussion Forum Posts - Contribute to required discussion forums in units 2–8.

Course Grading
Grading is based on the assignments

  • Song Presentation - 30 pts
  • Artist Profile - 150 pts
  • Exam 1 - 100 pts
  • Exam 2 - 100 pts
  • Discussion Forums - 170 pts

Instructor: Sean Lorre, sjlorre@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:239 Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online Short Course

Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online Short Course

Course Number: 07:700:239
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a compressed, 2-credit course.

How does a musical genre such as rock become a cultural force bringing about social, sartorial, and political change? How does our sense of identity—race, gender, class, etc.—influence the music we listen to? What roles do technology and commerce play in shaping local and global ideas of popular music? In short, how and why did rock ‘n’ roll transform the world?

This class broadly explores the history of rock music from a wide array of perspectives, covering the period from its early beginnings to rockabilly, soul, metal, punk, and many other subgenres throughout the second half of the 20th century.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goals:

  • To understand the historical development of rock 'n' roll and evaluate the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of one of the most popular and influential musical genres of the twentieth century.
  • To develop active/critical listening skills in order to classify rock and pre-rock recordings by (sub)genre and likely provenance while making inferences as to the work’s social function and cultural significance.

Course Objectives:
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which rock 'n' roll (broadly defined) developed and evaluate how such extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of the genre.
analyze pre-rock, rock 'n' roll and related recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and likely historical period.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
List and describe each assignment below.

  • Song Presentation Assignment - Two-three paragraph personal reflection about a rock-related song of your choosing. This project doubles as an introduction to uploading media in the Canvas Learning Management System
  • Artist Profile Project - An online artist profile of the rock or rock-related artist of your choice. The project includes a researched historical overview/critique of a musician/group and a song/album analysis.
  • Two Exams - held at the conclusion of units 3 and 6
    Discussion Forum Posts - Contribute to required discussion forums in units 2–5.

Course Grading
Grading is based on the assignments

  • Song Presentation - 50 pts
  • Artist Profile - 150 pts
  • Exam 1 - 100 pts
  • Exam 2 - 100 pts
  • Discussion Forums - 160 pts

Instructor: Sameer Anjur Ramchandran, sar328@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Farley Miller, fm351@rutgers.edu

07:700:241 Studies in World Music Online

Studies in World Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:241
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Studies in World Music focuses on introducing and surveying the music of diverse societies and cultures of the world using social and cultural theories and ethnomusicological methodologies as a framework. Throughout this course, students will explore the idea of “world music” in various social, cultural, and aesthetic contexts. To understand music as culture in the modern world, we must examine music in its various social functions and roles, as well as its theoretical components. The goal of this course is to cultivate an informed, critical, and sensitive understanding of music in the modern world. The purpose of this course is to serve as an introduction to and survey of the music of various societies throughout the world.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The goal of this course is to cultivate an informed, critical, and sensitive understanding of music in the modern world.

Course Objectives: In this course, the primary aspects of music will be discussed including: the contexts and occasions for music making; the social organization and functions of music, and; the oral, written, and mass mediated transmissions of music in the modern world. Fundamental aspects of sound—including pitch, phonic structure, rhythm and meter, texture, form, and expression—are identified and explained. Specific case studies are chosen in order to illustrate a wide range of musical expressions and related social issues. Knowledge will be acquired through the utilization of recordings, videos, readings and live performances.

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course students will have demonstrated that they:

  • Can use the appropriate musical/ethnomusicological terminology when analyzing and describing a variety of musics within social and cultural contexts.
  • Explain how music is characteristic of the people who make it, and how they use it in the modern world.
    understand the ways in which music is linked to sociocultural issues such as spirituality, politics, class, identity formation, and other theoretical constructs.

You do not have to be able to read music to understand the material in this course.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Assignments:

  • Discussion: Please Introduce Yourselves (5 points)
  • Acknowledgement of Course Policies (5 points)
  • Exam #1 (60 points)
  • Exam #2 (60 points)
  • Exam #3 (60 points)
  • Exam #4 (60 points)
  • Research Paper (90 points)
  • Discussion Post #1 (40 points)
  • Discussion Post #2 (40 points)
  • Discussion Post #3 (40 points)
  • Discussion Post #4 (40 points)
  • 500 points TOTAL

Instructor: Ruth M. "Sunni" Witmer, rw482@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:242 Country Music: A Cultural and Musical Survey Online

Country Music: A Cultural and Musical Survey Online

Course Number: 07:700:242
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Country music has been part of American popular culture for close to 100 years. From the fiddle tunes and blue yodels of the 1920s to the Americana revival and “hick-hop” of today, music associated with rural American life has fascinated and entertained. Moreover—despite its roots in obscure, rural Southern and Western folk song—country music has become one of the most commercially successful music styles of the past decade.

In this introductory-level elective course, students will cultivate critical thinking and analysis skills through the study of country music’s historical development. Following a detailed examination of the genre’s formation and popular trajectory over the course of the twentieth century, the course concludes with a thorough investigation of the cultural, social and musical implications of country music’s 21st-century resurgence.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Goals:

  • Students will gain an understanding of the historical development of country music.
  • Students will develop engaged listening skills in order to classify country music recordings by (sub)genre and provenance.
  • Students will develop an ability to think critically about the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of country music.

Course Objectives:
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Discuss the historical trajectory of country music from its origins to present-day trends.
  • Recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which country music (broadly defined) developed.
  • Evaluate how extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of country music.
  • Analyze country music recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and historical period.
  • Make inferences as to a country music recording’s likely social function and cultural significance based on elements of musical style.
  • Conduct basic online research from a select group of resources (Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum Digital Archive, Library of Congress Digital Archive, ProQuest Historical Newspapers Archive, America: History and Life, American Radio History Archive, etc.).
  • Create an online, multimedia presentation in the Canvas Learning Management System.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading is based on the assignments:

  • Song Presentation-10%
  • Artist Profile Online Presentation-24%
  • 3 Quizzes-36% (total)
  • Discussion Forums-30%

Final Grade Calculation (Points/Percentage Type)

  • 100 points / 10% Song Presentation Project
  • 200 points / 24% Artist Profile Online Presentation
  • 100 points / 10% Quiz 1 (units 1 & 2)
  • 100 points / 10% Quiz 2 (units 3 & 4)
  • 160 points / 16% Quiz 3 (units 5-7)
  • 240 points / 30% Discussion Forums (6 forums, 50 pts each)
  • 1000 points / 100% TOTAL

Instructor: Sean Lorre, sjlorre@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:243 Divas, Devils, and Drama: A History of Opera and Musical Theater Online

Divas, Devils, and Drama: A History of Opera and Musical Theater Online

Course Number: 07:700:243
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is an introduction to the operatic genre from the 17th century to the present day. Tracing opera’s history from the musical intermezzi of Florence, Italy, to the innovative and experimental productions heard around the world today, this course explores how opera serves as a lens through which a variety of cultural, performative, and historical issues may be examined.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The aim of this course is to trace the development of the music drama in terms of its stylistic and compositional characteristics and goals, and to examine its ability to communicate meaning through music, text, and performance. The course will consider the historical context of various creators, performers, and listeners of opera and musical theater.

Course Objectives
The specific objectives to be achieved through this course are:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the historical circumstances surrounding the emergence and development of opera and musical theater.
  • Demonstrate understanding of major elements of operatic style, conventions, and compositional techniques as they have evolved over the course of 450 years.
  • Be prepared to view, understand, and contextualize performances.
  • Employ critical thinking skills in order to synthesize issues concerning operatic composition, performance, and reception within larger artistic, social, and political contexts.

Learning Outcomes
After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Utilize a common vocabulary for speaking and writing about opera, musical theater, and music-making more broadly.
  • Describe the trajectories of operatic style, major schools, and performance contexts.
  • Identify major composers and relevant musical works.
  • Evaluate operatic performances based on the goals, stylistic conventions, and content of various musical styles through the development of critical listening skills.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading

  • Written Assignments 30 points (3 at 10 points each)
  • Discussion Forum Participation 15 points
  • Midterm Exam 25 points
  • Final Exam 30 points
  • TOTAL 100 points

Instructor: Rachael Leigh Lansang, rlb239@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:244 Global Popular Music Online

Global Popular Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:244
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course will explore the popular music of various societies from around the world, and how it is created and transformed by cultural and musical influences from other societies and world views when they encounter and interact with one another. Students will examine the artistic, cultural, and socioeconomic effects of global popular music. Topics of inquiry include hybridity and diversity in music; the effects of globalization on musical/cultural development; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from expressive cultural forms expanding around the world, both historically and currently.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: To understand music as culture in the modern world, we must examine it in its various social functions and roles, as well as its theoretical components. The goal of this course is to cultivate an informed, critical, and sensitive understanding of global popular music and its roles and functions in the modern world.

Course Objectives
In this course, the primary aspects of popular music from all over the world are presented. Course objectives include:

  • Understanding musical/ethnomusicological terminology and using it to analyze and describe popular music within musical, social, and cultural contexts;
  • Analyzing the roles and functions of popular music within the social organization of societies, and the contexts and occasions for popular music making around the world;
  • Examining the oral, written, and mass mediated transmissions of popular music in a global environment.

Fundamental aspects of sound—including pitch, phonic structure, rhythm and meter, texture, form, and expression—are identified and explained. Specific case studies are chosen in order to illustrate a wide range of musical expressions and related social issues. Knowledge will be acquired through the utilization of recordings, videos, readings, and live performances.

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course students will have demonstrated that they can:

  • Use appropriate musical/ethnomusicological terminology when analyzing and describing popular music within musical, social, and cultural contexts;
  • Recognize and realize the roles and functions of popular music within the social organization of societies, and the contexts and occasions for popular music making around the world;
  • Understand the ways in which popular music is created and consumed through its oral, written, and mass mediated transmissions in a global environment.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments

  • Exam #1
  • Exam #2
  • Exam #3
  • Exam #4
  • Research Paper
  • Experiential Learning Event Project (Note: The Experiential Learning Event Project assignment will be suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.)
  • Online Discussion Post #1
  • Online Discussion Post #2
  • Online Discussion Post #3
  • Online Discussion Post #4

Instructor: Ruth M. "Sunni" Witmer, rw482@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:247 Jazz Theory I

Jazz Theory I

Course Number: 07:700:247
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Rudiments of jazz improvisation and composition: Lydian chromatic scales, jazz modes, seventh chords, rhythm, intervallic retention, and meter; sight-reading and dictation in jazz idioms.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:122 and 124

Learning Goals of Course: Jazz Theory 247 examines fundamental theoretical material and concepts from written, aural, and performance practice vantage points within the swing, American songbook, and bebop genres. This course along with Jazz Theory II 248 is designed to help prepare students for Jazz Arranging, Jazz Improvisation, and Jazz Keyboard Harmony. As such, specific topics include chords, scales, voice-leading, form, harmonic & melodic vocabulary and analysis, composition, meter and rhythm.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance/Participation – 25%
  • Assignments/Homework/Quizzes – 25%
  • Major Exam Projects – 50%

Instructor: Ralph Bowen, rbowen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:251 Keyboard Harmonization I, Jazz Majors

Keyboard Harmonization I, Jazz Majors

Course Number: 07:700:251
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of basic piano voicings and harmonic sequences set to compositions.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:123 and 124

Learning Goals of Course: This course is intended to help non-piano majors develop a functional understanding and facility of jazz keyboard and related harmonic concepts. The premise is not to force students to become genuine pianists (though, always encouraged), but to allow all instrumentalists to convey basic musical ideas within a jazz context on the keyboard. This skill serves many applications, from enhanced rehearsal resources to composition and arranging, as well as a much-needed tool for teaching. It is widely held and accepted in professional circles that a basic, functional keyboard technique serves as a universal skill found in most competent contemporary musicians.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance/Participation – 25%
  • Assignments and Homework – 25%
  • Exams – 50%

Instructor: Marc J. Stasio, marc.stasio@rutgers.edu

07:700:253 Advanced Aural Skills III

Advanced Aural Skills III

Course Number: 07:700:253

Intended for Mason Gross music majors and qualified non-majors who have already completed Advanced Aural Skills II. Advanced Aural Skills III will continue using alto and tenor clef, introduce melodies with syncopated rhythms, triplets and duplets, introduce rhythm exercises that use triplets and duplets, and shift between simple and compound meter with either the beat or division constant. In addition, Advanced Aural Skills III will introduce melodies with chromatic inflections and modulation to the dominant and relative major and rhythm exercise that include quadruplets, quintuplets, and septuplets, four-against-three, and 5/8. Dictation exams will cover this material as well as harmonic dictations that include secondary function chords and modulations to the dominant and relative major. Advanced Aral Skills III will also add two additional content areas: atonal melodies using chromatic Fixed-Do, and score reading using all movable-C clefs. As in Advanced Aural Skills II, students will also be given the opportunity to compose and perform their own rhythmic and melodic examples incorporating the same features as the rhythm exercises and tonal melodies being studied.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisites: 07:700:221-222

07:700:261 Vocal Techniques For School Choirs

Vocal Techniques For School Choirs

Course Number: 07:700:261
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Vocal Technique for School Choirs is designed to provide an understanding of the technical elements of singing and strategies for teaching the coordination of those elements within the choral setting.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre- or corequisite: 07:700:121 or examination.
Learning Goals of Course:
As a result of this course, the students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic structure, function, and maintenance in order to use the singing voice properly/efficiently.
  • Develop adequate ability and specific techniques, such as respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation, with the singing voice in order to provide an appropriate model for a beginning student.
  • Develop and implement appropriate diagnostic and prescriptive pedagogical strategies for teaching and assessing K-12 students who are in a vocal ensemble.

Instructor: Brandon Williams, bwilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:263 String Instrumental Techniques

String Instrumental Techniques

Course Number: 07:700:263
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Fundamentals of playing and teaching the string instruments; survey of materials for use in the schools.

For Mason Gross music education students only.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre- or corequisite: 07:700:121
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, the students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic structure, function, and maintenance in order to use the violin, viola, cello, and/or upright bass properly/efficiently.
  • Develop adequate ability and specific playing techniques, such as pizzicato, bow hold, bow alignment, fingerings, posture, and characteristic tone, on the instruments in order to provide an appropriate model for a beginning student.
  • Develop and implement appropriate diagnostic and prescriptive pedagogical strategies for teaching and assessing K-12 students who are studying the instrument(s).
07:700:265 Woodwind Instrumental Techniques

Woodwind Instrumental Techniques

Course Number: 07:700:265
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Fundamentals of playing and teaching the woodwind instruments of the orchestra and band.

For Mason Gross music education students only.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre- or corequisite: 07:700:121
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, the students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic structure, function, and maintenance in order to use the woodwind family of instruments properly/efficiently.
  • Develop adequate ability and specific playing techniques, such as embouchure, breathing, fingerings, posture, and characteristic tone, on the instruments in order to provide an appropriate model for a beginning student.
  • Develop and implement appropriate diagnostic and prescriptive pedagogical strategies for teaching and assessing K-12 students who are studying the instrument(s).
07:700:267 Brass Instrumental Techniques

Brass Instrumental Techniques

Course Number: 07:700:267
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Fundamentals of playing and teaching the brass instruments of the orchestra and band.

For Mason Gross music educations students only.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre- or corequisite: 07:700:121
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, the students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic structure, function, and maintenance in order to use the brass family of instruments properly/efficiently.
  • Develop adequate ability and specific playing techniques, such as embouchure, breathing, fingerings, posture, and characteristic tone, on the instruments in order to provide an appropriate model for a beginning student.
  • Develop and implement appropriate diagnostic and prescriptive pedagogical strategies for teaching and assessing K-12 students who are studying the instrument(s).
07:700:269 Percussion Instrumental Techniques

Percussion Instrumental Techniques

Course Number: 07:700:269

Fundamentals of playing and teaching the percussion instruments of the orchestra and band.

For Mason Gross music education students only.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre- or corequisite: 07:700:121
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, the students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic structure, function, and maintenance in order to use typical K-12 percussion instruments properly/efficiently.
  • Develop adequate ability and specific playing techniques, such as stick and mallet grips, stroke patterns, etc., on the instruments in order to provide an appropriate model for a beginning student.
  • Develop and implement appropriate diagnostic and prescriptive pedagogical strategies for teaching and assessing K-12 students who are studying the instrument(s).
07:700:284 Digital Audio Composition

Digital Audio Composition

Course Number: 07:700:284
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Digital Audio Composition introduces students to the digital audio workstation, as well as basic concepts of computer music, sound, and electroacoustic composition. Students will develop compositional skills through their own creative projects as well as the study of a wide range of electronic/computer music.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:105 or 127 or 135
Learning Goals of Course

Upon completion of Digital Audio Composition, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic properties of sound
  • Demonstrate the ability to record, edit, process, mix and master digital audio and MIDI using a digital audio workstation
  • Demonstrate the ability to create and develop musical ideas using digital audio and MIDI sequencing techniques
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret electronic/computer-based music through writing

Instructor: Michael Zavorskas, mz407@rutgers.edu

07:700:287 Choral Music Education Lab I

Choral Music Education Lab I

Course Number: 07:700:287
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Choral Music Education Lab I is designed for vocal music education students and provides opportunities to practice practical skills necessary to teach vocal music ensembles in the K-12 setting.

1 credits

Learning Goals of Course:
As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Lead an ensemble in a warm-up.
  • Demonstrate adequate piano skills for leading the ensemble warm-up.
  • Participate as a member of the ensemble and learn from peers by observing the successes and challenges of others when they teach.
  • Build skills as a reflective-practitioner by analyzing recordings of self-teaching, making improvements based on instructor and peer feedback, and identifying personal goals for growth.

Instructor: Brandon Williams, bwilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:290 Rock & Roll as a Cultural Phenomenon: Hist and Dev of Rock and Related Genres

Rock & Roll as a Cultural Phenomenon: Hist and Dev of Rock and Related Genres

Course Number: 07:700:290

Survey of the influence of rock and roll with a focus on the artists and music that reflected and influenced American society.

3 credit(s)

07:700:291 Jazz Appreciation

Jazz Appreciation

Course Number: 07:700:291

Survey of the relationships between jazz and other African-American musical traditions from the early 1900s to the present.

3 credit(s)

07:700:292 Musics of the World

Musics of the World

Course Number: 07:700:292

An introduction to the study of the intersection of music and culture as exhibited in diverse regions across the globe.

3 credit(s)

07:700:293 Introduction to Jazz Improvisation Online

Introduction to Jazz Improvisation Online

Course Number: 07:700:293
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Introduction to Jazz Improvisation covers the basic harmonic structures underlying melodic jazz improvisation. During the course the student will be introduced to both the vertical (chord spellings including tensions) and horizontal (diatonic) harmonic structures found in many types of western music; including classical, jazz, hip hop, folk, pop, rock gospel, and other popular musical forms.

The student will learn to improvise with these 3 and 4 note structures and apply there use over common chord progressions. Each online lesson includes a detailed video explanation, a written description, as well as supplemental audio play-along material.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Learning Objectives:

  • To demonstrate a theoretical understanding of major, minor, dominant “vertical” harmonic spelling
  • Including altered dominant spellings such as b9, #9, #11, #5, 13.
  • To demonstrate a basic ability to improvised from a major pentatonic scale in all 12 keys.
  • To develop a strong relative pitch allowing for the recognition of intervals and harmonic tensions by ear, without the use of an instrument.
  • To be able to improvise over a standard jazz progression (Autumn Leaves) using the concepts outlined in the course.
  • To understand the basics of the ii – V – I progression both vertically and horizontally (modes and key centers).
  • To fully understand the numerical analysis of common harmonic structures in all 12 keys.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Time and Workload: Students should expect to spend up to 6 hours each week working with each of the online lessons. Reading the description, watching the video, practicing and digesting the material using the PDF’s, Drum and Bass play along tracks, drones and other included materials. Discussion with other students can take place at the Piazza online forum, weekly homework assessment and midterm and final examinations will be arranged during virtual office hours with the professor, through video chat or email.

Reading/Listening: Lessons with embedded audio/video: 1-2 hours/week

Homework Assignments (HW): Performance of lesson concept and written test when relevant.

Projects: Written and improvised melodic ideas over specific harmonic structures – progressions or individual chords (modal).

Exams: Chord spelling, chord performance including triads in all inversions and with single note embellishment both diatonic and non-diatonic tensions and pentatonic and modal improvisation.

Instructor: Michael Noordzy, noordzy@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:301 Music History I

Music History I

Course Number: 07:700:301

Styles and forms of Western music from antiquity to the present.

Intended primarily for music majors.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:122

07:700:303 Principles of Ethnomusicology

Principles of Ethnomusicology

Course Number: 07:700:303

Selected topics on the musical cultures of the Pacific, Asia, Near East, and Africa; and the aboriginal music of the Americas.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:122 or permission of instructor

07:700:305 Evolution of Jazz

Evolution of Jazz

Course Number: 07:700:305
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

History of jazz. First semester: African and African-American origins to the 1930s; basics of improvisation; development of aural ability to distinguish forms and styles. Second semester: jazz of the 1940s to the present.

Intended for Mason Gross jazz studies majors.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:122 and 124

Learning Goals of Course: At the end of the course, students will possess knowledge of the jazz idioms as taught through the school curriculum and will have developed an ability to identify the various stylistic jazz genres and an enhanced appreciation of jazz music.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Jazz Styles by Mark C. Gridley, 9th or 10th edition

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Listening Exam – 10%
  • Quizes – 10%
  • Concert – 10%
  • Midterm – 30%
  • Final Exam – 40%

Instructor: Kenny Davis, kendavis@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:310 The Business of Music Online

The Business of Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:310
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course covers the fundamentals of the music industry from a variety of perspectives including major record labels and publishers, independent musicians and labels, managers, attorneys, and agents. Furthermore, students will gain entrepreneurial experience recording their own work and releasing/promoting it to the on-line community. There will also be some brief discussion about musician finances, job/internship acquisition/promotion, resume writing, and career building. This is the new online version of the former face-to-face class.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • To gain a broad understanding of music publishing including the departments of a major music publisher and how they interact with one another, copyright definitions/enforcement/filing criteria (including the rights granted when one creates a copyrightable work), and the various income types with a focus on mechanical licensing procedures including statutory rate and royalty calculations.
  • To learn how to register as both a writer and publisher with one of the major performing rights organizations (ASCAP or BMI) in order to be eligible to receive performance royalties for their musical works.
  • To gain a broad understanding of record company operations including the departments of a major record label and how they interact with one another, learn about the different types of recording contracts, and be able to generate royalty statements for artists, producers, and/or publishers.
  • To understand the way an artist’s personal team of advisors coordinates in order to enhance and further the artist’s career. We will discuss the responsibilities of the personal manager, business manager, attorneys, and agents.
  • To be able to write an effective artist’s biography as part of an overall marketing strategy as well as developing a web presence through traditional and social media.
  • To develop professional speaking and negotiation skills.
  • To learn how to release their own independent recording through available digital outlets and begin to develop a following from the ground up.
  • To be able to write an effective resume.

Course Objectives: Students will demonstrate through participation in class discussions, presentations, projects, and tests their growing business acumen and ability to complete tasks in a timely basis.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Final Grade Calculation:

  • 30% Homework Assignments & Participation
  • 10% Copyrights & Music Publishing Test
  • 15% Mid-Term Examination15%Final Examination (cumulative)
  • 30% Final Project, split into four pieces:
    • Completing your recording (25%)
    • Obtaining artwork for your project (25%)
    • Releasing your project to Spotify and other digital services through a 3rd party digital aggregator. This will cost you approximately $15. Please do not sign up for any so-called "premium" services. (25%)
    • Either:
      • Original work: registering with either ASCAP or BMI as both a publisher and a songwriter. This will cost you approximately $100. (25%)
      • Cover song: obtaining a mechanical license from the publisher. This will cost less than $100. (25%)

Instructor: Christopher Opperman, cdo25@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:311 Art of Production I: Recording

Art of Production I: Recording

Course Number: 07:700:311
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The primary purpose of this class is to introduce students to the fundamentals of sound and the tools and techniques needed to record, edit, and process a wide variety of audio sources for music, videos, podcasts, audiobooks, and other media outlets. Students will engage in ear training using current and historical recordings to help develop critical listening and the ability to set their own sonic goals. Lessons include topics and discussion of acoustics, microphones, mixers, speakers, recorders, digital audio workstations (DAWs), signal processing, project studios, and the real-world practices of the professional studio and will provide the tools for students to confidently pursue their own recording projects.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:105 or 127 or 135
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of Art of Production I: Recording, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following:

  • Basic properties of sound and hearing
  • Best practices and equipment for capturing musical instruments and other audio sources as desired
  • Best practices to use technology to create original recordings, as desired, and edit them
  • The distinctive factors of analog and digital gear, and the basics of audio digitization and data manipulation
  • Audio processing equipment, and the ability to utilize the audio studio to produce desired results

Instructor: Adam Klein, ak2035@rutgers.edu

07:700:329 Conducting I

Conducting I

Course Number: 07:700:329

Fundamentals of conducting and organization of school choruses, bands, and orchestras.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:222

07:700:341 Orchestration I

Orchestration I

Course Number: 07:700:341

Study and demonstration of instruments of the orchestra; writing idiomatically for individual instruments; scoring for small ensembles.

Intended primarily for BM music education students.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:222

07:700:347 Jazz Composition & Arranging

Jazz Composition & Arranging

Course Number: 07:700:347
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Fundamentals of jazz composition and arranging, beginning with arrangements for two or three winds and rhythm sections; and culminating in compositions and arrangements for large ensembles in early, modern, and popular jazz idioms.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:247-248 and 251-252

Learning Goals of Course: Jazz Composition and Arranging I is designed to introduce students to the essential creative elements of contemporary music writing using structures that can guide the process. A fundamental overview of jazz writing is presented to inspire new writers within the jazz vocabulary and better appreciate contributions from the great masters. The course seeks to emphasize how the creative process, though seemingly abstract or elusive at times, can be aided by techniques to spur on inventiveness and expressiveness. Students will become familiar with principles used in scores to organize the composers’ thoughts and to leverage basic building blocks, as found in the great works of the past. To remain timely, an emphasis is placed on real-world writing opportunities, learning to produce scores quickly to meet typically short deadlines as well as preparing works for publication.

At the completion of the course, student will possess the needed skills to efficiently produce high-quality, publisher-ready jazz compositions and arrangements, possessing good form and balance, in a timely manner as is often required in today’s fast-paced market.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Blank Manuscript Pads

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance/Participation – 25%
  • Assignments/Homework/Quizzes – 25%
  • Major Exam Projects – 50%

Instructor: Marc J. Stasio, marc.stasio@rutgers.edu

07:700:353 Advanced Aural Skills V

Advanced Aural Skills V

Course Number: 07:700:353

Intended for Mason Gross music majors and qualified non-majors who have already completed Aural Skills IV. Aural Skills V introduces modal music while continuing to study tonal melodies with increasing chromaticism, modulation to other closely related keys, use of triplets, duplets, and hemiola, changing meter, additive meters, meters with notes other than the quarter/dotted-quarter as the beat unit; rhythm exercises using asymmetric beat divisions (quintuplets, septuplets both at the beat and beat division level), asymmetric meters and changing asymmetric meters. Students will continue to develop fluency with chromatic fixed-Do by applying it to simple atonal melodies. Harmonic dictations will continue to focus on chromatic harmonies, introducing augmented sixth and Neapolitan chords as well as modulation to closely related keys. Sing-and-Play exercises will continue to focus on two-part exercises in treble and bass clef but with increased use of diatonic leaps and greater rhythmic independence of the two lines.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:224 or 254

07:700:371 Jazz Improvisation I

Jazz Improvisation I

Course Number: 07:700:371
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Jazz techniques involving chord nomenclature, melodic development, turnbacks, cycles, the blues, scale coloring, rhythmic patterns, and harmonic concepts.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:247-248 and 251-252

Learning Goals of Course: Jazz Improvisation I expands on acquired fundamentals of jazz theory, harmony, and melodic construction through practical application. Key components of exemplary improvised solos are analyzed and dissected to gain further perspectives and assimilation. Students strengthen spontaneous creation through classroom playing activities, transcription and listening projects, exercise assignments, and prescribed practice routines with an emphasis on developing their own sound and style.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Expand linear, harmonic, and rhythmic jazz vocabulary
  • Further develop ear-training skills for analysis and transcriptions
  • Expand stylistic improvisational approach based on genre/era
  • Learn and appreciate effective soloing concepts from mentor examples
  • Develop heightened practice routines that strengthen spontaneous creation skills

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Assignments & Projects:

  • Weekly practice items, routines
  • Tune memorization (2 per week) Listening analysis and written projects

Exams:

  • Midterm and Final Performance Exams (Jury style)

Grading:

  • Attendance/Preparedness/Participation – 25%
  • Class Assignments & Homework – 25%
  • Major Exams & Projects – 50%

Instructor: Marc J. Stasio, marc.stasio@rutgers.edu

07:700:375 Composition Practicum

Composition Practicum

Course Number: 07:700:375

A project-based course for undergraduate composition majors in collaboration with students from the dance, digital film, theater, and other departments.

1 credit(s)

07:700:381 Methods & Materials for Elementary School Music

Methods & Materials for Elementary School Music

Course Number: 07:700:381
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

A hands-on activity approach to K-8 general music teaching and learning. This course addresses traditional and emerging practices in general music classrooms. Fieldwork is required.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:210
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Develop advanced skills in planning, writing, sequencing, implementing, and reflecting upon lessons and assessments specific to the elementary music classroom utilizing the Understanding by
  • Design (UBD) framework, NJ Core Arts Standards and the National Core Arts Standards.
  • Demonstrate, through in-school visits and class attendance, professional responsibility, ethical behavior, and reflective thought at a level required for continuation in the music education program.
  • Through in-class activities and curricular materials produced, demonstrate knowledge and appropriate application of general music approaches, particularly Kodály, Orff, Dalcroze, and informal learning.
  • Through in-class activities and curricular materials produced, demonstrate progressively deeper understanding of the developmental abilities (cognitive, physical, social, and emotional) of students aged three to fourteen and how these abilities impact musical instruction.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in elementary-specific musical competencies (accompanying while singing, sight-reading using solfege and Curwen hand-signs, and recorder playing).
  • Develop skills in creating and utilizing assessments and rubrics to align with objectives and standards.
  • Identify and evaluate resources and materials appropriate for use in an elementary general music context.
  • Demonstrate through lesson planning and presentations, an understanding of singing, moving, playing, creating, listening, responding, reading, and connecting specific to the elementary general music classroom both in-person and virtual.

Instructor: Stephanie Cronenberg, scronenberg@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:386 Instrumental Music Education Lab

Instrumental Music Education Lab

Course Number: 07:700:386
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Practical conducting and performance of repertoire for K-12 ensembles. Sections in choral and instrumental emphases offered in alternate years.1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:210
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Lead an ensemble in a warm-up and teach a selected piece of repertoire.
  • Perform on a secondary instrument with adequate proficiency to model a characteristic tone and appropriate intermediate-level technique specific to the instrument.
  • Participate as a member of the ensemble and learn from peers by observing the successes and challenges of others when they teach.
  • Use and improve conducting gesture and develop effective rehearsal techniques and strategies for effective teaching of intermediate-level instrumental ensemble
  • Build skills as a reflective-practitioner by analyzing recordings of self-teaching, making improvements based on instructor and peer feedback, and identifying personal goals for growth.

Instructor: Julia Baumanis, j.baumanis@rutgers.edu

07:700:387 Choral Music Education Lab II

Choral Music Education Lab II

Course Number: 07:700:387
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Choral Music Education Lab II is designed for vocal music education students and provides opportunities to practice practical skills necessary to teach vocal music ensembles in the K-12 setting.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:210
Learning Goals of Course:
As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Teach/rehearse a selected piece of repertoire.
  • Demonstrate adequate piano skills for leading the selected repertoire.
  • Participate as a member of the ensemble and learn from peers by observing the successes and challenges of others when they teach.
  • Use and improve conducting gesture and develop effective rehearsal techniques and strategies for effective teaching of a mixed intermediate-level choir.
  • Build skills as a reflective practitioner by analyzing recordings of self-teaching, making improvements based on instructor and peer feedback, and identifying personal goals for growth.

Instructor: Brandon Williams, bwilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:389 Inclusive Learning in Music Online

Inclusive Learning in Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:389
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Skills and techniques for teaching music to diverse student populations. Emphasis is on neurological, physical, and behavioral diversity, but other aspects of student diversity are also addressed. Strategies for teaching music in both inclusive and self-contained music classrooms.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course

Course Objectives:

  • Demonstrate awareness of the political, social, and historical contexts of special education.
  • Be prepared to work as a music educator within an inclusive and collaborative educational structure.
  • Develop a keen awareness of, and strong commitment to, teaching the full range of learners with disabilities.
  • Anticipate high-priority needs, as well as effectively teach and make routine accommodations for students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 plans.

Course Learning Outcomes:

  • After completing this music education course, students will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Public School Education and the challenges encountered in providing an equal opportunity for all students.
  • Consider the current structure of special education and a brief history of legislation and litigation in the United States relevant to special education.
  • Examine the process of fieldwork with students who have special needs.
  • Obtain competencies necessary for appropriate and meaningful engagement with students whoha ve special needs in K-12 music classrooms.
  • Adopt a paradigm of student centered and inclusive classrooms.
  • Describe curriculum and assessment for students with special needs.
  • Identify appropriate teaching strategies for performers with special needs.
  • Identify teacher and student dispositions and qualities when teaching students who are intellectually gifted or twice exceptional.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Hammel, A.M. & Hourigan, R.M. (2017). Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Label-Free Approach (second edition). New York. Oxford University Press.

Hammel, A.M. (2017). Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Practical Resource. New York. Oxford University Press.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments and Grading Policy

  • Weekly Projects 40%
  • Final Project (Case Study) 25%
  • Class Participation (comments to peers on projects) 15%
  • Discussion Question Completion 20%
  • TOTAL 100%

Your Final Grade will be weighted with each assignment counting as a percentage of the total grade.

Instructor: Alice M. Hammel, ah1029@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:419 Special Studies in Music History

Special Studies in Music History

Course Number: 07:700:419

Intensive study of a single topic from a variety of perspectives; reading, discussion, and oral and written reports.

Intended for music majors.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:301-302

07:700:471 Jazz Improvisation II

Jazz Improvisation II

Course Number: 07:700:471
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Jazz techniques exploring forms in jazz from 1925 to the present; the study of cadences; the Lydian chromatic concept as applied to defining specific devices and as manifested in various compositions.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:700:371-372

Learning Goals of Course: Jazz Improvisation II expands on acquired fundamentals of jazz theory, harmony, and melodic construction through practical application. Key components of exemplary improvised solos are analyzed and dissected to gain further perspectives and assimilation. Students strengthen spontaneous creation through classroom playing activities, transcription and listening projects, exercise assignments, and prescribed practice routines with an emphasis on developing their own sound and style.

Learning Outcomes

  • Expand linear, harmonic, and rhythmic jazz vocabulary
  • Further develop ear-training skills for analysis and transcriptions
  • Expand stylistic improvisational approach based on genre/era
  • Learn and appreciate effective soloing concepts from mentor examples
  • Develop heightened practice routines that strengthen spontaneous creation skills

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Assignments & Projects:

  • Weekly practice items, routines
  • Tune memorization (2 per week) Listening analysis and written projects

Exams:

  • Midterm and Final Performance Exams (Jury style)

Grading:

  • Attendance/Preparedness – 25%
  • Class Assignments & Homework – 25%
  • Major Exams & Projects – 50%

Instructor: Ralph Bowen, rbowen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:483 Clinical Practice 1 Seminar

Clinical Practice 1 Seminar

Course Number: 07:700:483
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Examination of problems relevant to contemporary elementary and secondary music education, to process what is learned during the part-time student teaching placement, preparation for full-time student teaching and the required certification portfolio (edTPA).

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisite: 07:700:484
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Articulate knowledge of their classroom setting, school community, and student needs as these relate to various aspects of musical learning as demonstrated through successful completion of the edTPA Context for Learning.
  • Critically reflect on their perspectives and biases in order to improve their identity as a music teacher professional as demonstrated during in-class discussions and the final reflection paper.
  • Analyze their classroom practice in order to successfully make real-time changes to instruction as evidenced through successful completion of the edTPA Planning and Instruction Tasks.
  • Analyze the classroom data they collect in order to make data-driven decisions and adaptations to instruction as evidenced through successful completion of the edTPA Assessment Task.

Instructor: David Martin, dmartin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:484 Clinical Practice 1

Clinical Practice 1

Course Number: 07:700:484
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Part-time student teaching in approved schools under the supervision of members of the faculty.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisite: 07:700:483
Learning Goals of Course

As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • With guidance and feedback from the University Supervisor and the K-12 Cooperating Teacher, students in this course will develop the abilities to reflect upon and take appropriate actions to improve their practical day-to-day skills in teaching music to K-12 students.
  • Students prepare lessons for, implement, and are evaluated on in-classroom K-12 music teaching.

Instructor: Stephanie Cronenberg, scronenberg@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:493 Independent Study

Independent Study

Course Number: 07:700:493
Mode of Instruction:Topic and goals determined in consultation with the instructor.

BA credits

07:700:495 Senior Hon Tutorial

Senior Hon Tutorial

Course Number: 07:700:495

Topic and goals determined in consultation with the instructor.

3 credits

07:701:100 Music Assembly

Music Assembly

Course Number: 07:701:100
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Required of all bachelor of music students during each semester of full-time enrollment. Grade based on attendance.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge of a broader spectrum of music profession. Students will engage with performing artists, music educators, and music administrators. Students will build skills to critically think about music and will be able to forge connections with professionals in the field.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Attendance is required for all sessions.

Assignments: attend two concerts at MGSA (one solo, one large ensemble) and write a report for each concert attended.

Grading is based on attendance and submission of two (2) written concert reports.

Instructor: Karina Bruk, bruk@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:103 Instrumental/Voice Lesson

Instrumental/Voice Lesson

Course Number: 07:701:103
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of repertoire, technique, and interpretation

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course , students will be able to perform solo and ensemble repertoire from various periods at a progressively higher level.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Published repertoire and etudes as assigned.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on the student’s weekly progress, attendance, and the performance of a jury or recital.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu, 201-446-4521

07:701:159 Classroom Piano I

Classroom Piano I

Course Number: 07:701:159

1 credit(s)

07:701:175 Applied Major Lesson

Applied Major Lesson

Course Number: 07:701:175
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of repertoire, technique, and interpretation

BA credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will learn to perform solo and ensemble repertoire at a progressively higher level.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Published repertoire and etudes as assigned
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on the student’s weekly progress, attendance, and the performance of a recital or jury.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu, 201-446-4521

07:701:201 Diction For Singers

Diction For Singers

Course Number: 07:701:201
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The study of pronunciation of Latin, Italian, and English as applied to singing, utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:701:122
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will:

  • Recognize and pronounce IPA characters in three languages.
  • Cite rules for applying the IPA to a foreign language text.
  • Use the pronunciation information correctly when singing an art song or aria in English, Italian, or Latin.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Diction for singers, 2nd edition, by Joan Wall

Additional practice sheets handed out or posted on Canvas as class progresses.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Attendance: Students are expected to be in class on time every week. However, attendance is not a factor in grading unless the student misses an important in-class assignment.

Assignments: Due in class on the date indicated on the syllabus. No late assignments are accepted. If the student is ill, s/he/they may submit an assignment via a classmate or instructor’s email.

Exams: There are three individual oral exams (English, Italian and Latin) given by private appointment and scheduled at student convenience. There is one final exam for all three languages, scheduled during finals week. Occasional announced quizzes during the semester.

Grading: Standard university grading standards for A-F apply and are explained in the grading rubric for the class.

Students are encouraged to ask for private Zoom appointments to practice pronunciation.

Instructor: Judith Nicosia, jnicosia@mgsa.rutgers.edu, civitano@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:203 Secondary Lesson

Secondary Lesson

Course Number: 07:701:203
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of repertoire, technique, and interpretation. Intended for music education majors.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Recommended Prerequisite: 07:700:261, 07:700:263, 07:700:265, 07:700:267, or 07:700:269 as appropriate to the chosen instrument.
Learning Goals of Course
As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Build on performance techniques, knowledge, and skills gained in 07:700:261-269 to perform on the selected instrument/voice at an advanced beginner or intermediate level.
  • Articulate appropriate corrections to common problems faced by beginning players on the instrument/voice.
  • Identify appropriate beginning and intermediate level repertoire for the instrument/voice.
  • Develop performance skills on the instrument/voice adequate for participation as a member of the 07:700:386/387 ensemble.
07:701:204 Secondary Lesson Alternative

Secondary Lesson Alternative

Course Number: 07:701:204
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of repertoire, technique, and interpretation. Intended for composition or music education majors.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:Upon completion of this course, students will learn to perform solo and ensemble repertoire at a progressively higher level.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Published repertoire and etudes as assigned.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on weekly progress and attendance.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu, 201-446-4521

07:701:251 Bassoon Reed Making

Bassoon Reed Making

Course Number: 07:701:251
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Elective weekly class providing instruction and guidance in bassoon reed making, including instruction in appropriate tools and techniques.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisite: Registered for at least one: 07:701:175, 07:701:176, 07:701:275, 07:701:276, 07:701:375, 07:701:376, 07:701:475, 07:701:476, 08:703:575, 08:703:576, 08:703:675, 08:703:676, 08:703:701, 08:703:702
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to make and adjust their own reeds. They will be able to understand and have fluency with every step of the reed making process. They will be able to name the parts of the reed and explain their function, identify the major reed making tools and their function, properly form a bassoon reed blank, compare and contrast dull and sharp reed making knives, discuss how variations in color, grain, shape, and density of cane can affect the finished bassoon reed, demonstrate proper knife sharpening technique, and identify and evaluate unbalanced reeds and articulate the appropriate corrective actions, and apply the proper processing techniques to produce a functional bassoon reed.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:252 Oboe Reed Making

Oboe Reed Making

Course Number: 07:701:252
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Elective weekly class providing instruction and guidance in oboe reed making, including instruction in appropriate tools and techniques.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisite: Registered for at least one – 07:701:175, 07:701:176, 07:701:275, 07:701:276, 07:701:375, 07:701:376, 07:701:475, 07:701:476, 08:703:575, 08:703:576, 08:703:675, 08:703:676, 08:703:701, 08:703:702
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to make and adjust their own reeds, understand and have fluency with every step of the reedmaking process, name the parts of the reed and explain their function, identify the major reed making tools and their function, properly tie an oboe reed, compare and contrast dull and sharp reed making knives, discuss how variations in color, grain, shape, thickness of wall, and diameter of cane can affect the finished oboe reed, demonstrate proper knife sharpening technique, identify and evaluate unbalanced reeds and articulate the appropriate corrective actions, apply the proper processing techniques – splitting, guillotining, planning, gouging, shaping, tying, knife sharpening, scraping, and clipping – to produce a functional oboe reed.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:259 Classroom Piano III

Classroom Piano III

Course Number: 07:701:259

1 credit(s)

07:701:302 Vocal Coaching

Vocal Coaching

Course Number: 07:701:302
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course includes the exploration and coaching of vocal repertory involving interpretation of music and text, historical context, and diction on a weekly basis. It acts as a supplement to vocal performance study and should therefore cover material that comes primarily from lesson assignments, leading to juries and recitals. Between 6 and 15 works will be covered each semester.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Corequisite: 07:701:375/376
Learning Goals of Course
By completion of the course, students will have:

  • An increased mastery of diction in the various languages
  • A stylistic understanding of vocal repertoire from various musical eras
  • An understanding of methods for pairing text and music for deeper understanding and interpretation
  • A path to integrate technical, musical and linguistic concerns for performance

Required and Recommended Course Materials

  • Diction for Singers by Joan Wall and Robert Caldwell
  • Interpretation of French Art Song by Pierre Bernac
  • The Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Book of Lieder
  • Ring of Words by Philip Miller

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading

  • Preparation:
    • Notes and Rhythms 25%
    • IPA and Translations 25%
  • Integration/Performance:
    • Integration during study 25%
    • Final performance 25%

Attendance and Participation

Students will receive 12 weekly 1-hour coachings. If the instructor has to miss, a make-up will be offered. If the student has to miss, it is in the teacher’s discretion and availability if it will be made up. A minimum of 11 are needed to complete the course. More than two late arrivals will affect the grade adversely. Students should bring current repertoire from their performance study instructors. The repertoire should be prepared to the extent that the student can be flexible with suggestions as to notes, rhythms, translations, IPA, ornamentation and performance practice.

Assessment: Preparation

Student preparation of pitches and rhythms
Grade Range Criteria

  • A The student regularly comes fully prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in all scores.
  • B+ The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 90% of scores.
  • B The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 80% of scores.
  • C+ The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 70% of scores.
  • C The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 60% of scores.
  • D The student regularly comes poorly prepared in terms of pitches and rhythms in all scores.
  • F The student is regularly unprepared in terms of pitch and rhythm in all scores.

Student preparation of IPA and translations
Grade Range Criteria

  • A The student has written the IPA and translations in all scores.
  • B+ The student has written the IPA and translations in 90% of scores.
  • B The student has written the IPA and translations in 80% of scores.
  • C+ The student has written the IPA and translations in 70% of scores.
  • C The student has written the IPA and translations in 60% of scores.
  • D The student regularly comes poorly prepared in terms of IPA and translations in all scores.
  • F The student is regularly unprepared in terms of IPA and translations in all scores.

Assessment: Integration and Performance

Student’s ability to Integrate the material during study
Grade Range Criteria

  • A Integration is at a very high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it within the lesson.
  • B+ Integration is at a high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it between the lessons.
  • B Integration is at a high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it between the lessons.
  • C+ Integration is at an average level; student is able to receive some constructive criticism and apply it over time to most repertoire, though with some difficulty.
  • C Integration is at an average level; student is able to receive some constructive criticism and apply it over time to some of the repertoire with difficulty.
  • D Integration is below average; student is unable to receive constructive criticism and apply it over time to most of the repertoire.
  • F Integration is poor; student is unable to receive constructive criticism and apply it over time to the repertoire.

Student’s artistic results
Grade Range Criteria

  • A Final performance of all repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • B+ Final performance of 90% of repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • B Final performance of 80% of repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • C+ Final performance of at least 80% of repertoire is at an artistically average level, showing some integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • C Final performance of at least 70% of repertoire is at an artistically average level, showing some integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • D Final performance of most scores shows little or no integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • F Final performance of all scores shows no integration of musicianship, language and technique.

Instructor: Barbara González-Palmer, bgp@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:303 RU Baroque Players

RU Baroque Players

Course Number: 07:701:303
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

An ensemble dedicated to the historically-informed performance of early music.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: By participating in the ensemble, students will develop skills for the performance and interpretation of early music (before ca. 1800) according to historically-informed performance practice, and become familiar with the conventions of the styles of music studied during the semester.

Students will gain facility working with period-instrument equipment.

Students will cultivate the sense of collaboration and creativity that comes from small-ensemble work.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students will have access to school-owned period instruments and equipment.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Performance in the semester final concert is mandatory.

Instructor: Albert Bellefeuille, atb124@rutgers.edu

07:701:307 Rutgers New Music Workshop

Rutgers New Music Workshop

Course Number: 07:701:307

An ensemble intended for undergraduate composition majors to learn and work on various skills related to their original compositions and undergraduate performers who wish to play contemporary music.

1 credit(s)

07:701:308 Rutgers University String Ensemble

Rutgers University String Ensemble

Course Number: 07:701:308
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

An ensemble which studies and performs chamber orchestra repertoire without a conductor.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will have learned to effectively and respectfully rehearse and perform chamber orchestra repertoire representing a variety of musical styles

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Parts and scores as assigned
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on attendance, individual part preparation, and performance evaluation.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:311 Rutgers University Kirkpatrick Choir

Rutgers University Kirkpatrick Choir

Course Number: 07:701:311

A select mixed choir that surveys and performs a broad spectrum of music, sacred and secular, from all periods. Occasional performance of large works with orchestra.

1 credit(s)

07:701:319 Chamber Jazz Ensemble

Chamber Jazz Ensemble

Course Number: 07:701:319
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The emphasis of the Chamber Jazz Ensemble course is to prepare the student for a career as a successful performer by rehearsing, performing, and gaining exposure to standard jazz repertoire in small group format.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

The main learning outcomes seek to develop core strengths in:

  • Sight-reading
  • Section playing
  • Ensemble precision
  • Improvisational skills
  • Knowledge of diverse styles.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: None

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • 50% – Performance Preparedness and Practicing Level
  • 25% – Ensemble Participation and Attendance
  • 25% – Class Assignments, Tune Contributions
07:701:321 Jazz Ensemble

Jazz Ensemble

Course Number: 07:701:321
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Exploration and performance of traditional and contemporary jazz for a large ensemble.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

The main learning outcomes seek to develop core strengths in:

  • Sight-reading
  • Section playing
  • Ensemble precision
  • Improvisational skills
  • Knowledge of diverse styles.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:n/a

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • 50% – Performance Preparedness and Practicing Level
  • 25% – Ensemble and Jazz Studio Day Participation, Attendance, & Agreement Deadlines
  • 25% – Sectional Rehearsals

Instructor: Conrad Herwig, cherwig@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:323 Orchestra

Orchestra

Course Number: 07:701:323
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of major orchestral repertoire.

Registration for this course number is for string students only.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pending ensemble placement audition at the beginning of each semester
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to rehearse and perform symphonic and operatic works and to play parts for their instrument required in professional auditions.

07:701:325 Percussion Ensemble

Percussion Ensemble

Course Number: 07:701:325

Study and performance of music for percussion ensemble.

1 credit(s)

07:701:327 Brass Ensemble

Brass Ensemble

Course Number: 07:701:327

Study and performance of the literature for brass ensemble. Emphasis is placed on mastering the principles of brass playing within an ensemble.

1 credit(s)

07:701:331 Jazz Ensemble II

Jazz Ensemble II

Course Number: 07:701:331
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Exploration and performance of traditional and contemporary jazz for a large ensemble.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

The main learning outcomes seek to develop core strengths in:

  • Sight-reading
  • Section playing
  • Ensemble precision
  • Improvisational skills
  • Knowledge of diverse styles.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • 50% – Performance Preparedness and Practicing Level
  • 25% – Ensemble and Jazz Studio Day Participation, Attendance, & Agreement Deadlines
  • 25% – Sectional Rehearsals

Instructor: Abraham Burton, aburton@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:333 Voorhees Choir

Voorhees Choir

Course Number: 07:701:333
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The Rutgers Voorhees Choir is a soprano-alto ensemble that performs a repertory of challenging and engaging music. They present one main concert per semester and smaller performances as Rutgers and Douglass College ambassadors. The Rutgers Voorhees Choir is a performance course designed to develop singing technique and music reading skills and improve knowledge in the essential elements of choral music and public performance.

1 credits

Learning Goals of Course:
As a result of this course, students will:

  • Sing a variety of soprano-alto repertoire, alone or in small groups, while demonstrating mastery of their vocal part, vocal technique, and musical expression appropriate to the musical style.
  • Reflect on and evaluate their performance.
  • Participate in musical activities designed to stimulate aesthetic responses.
  • Develop performance skills that foster self-confidence.

Instructor: Brandon Williams, bwilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:337 Marching Band

Marching Band

Course Number: 07:701:337
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and implementation of precision musical and marching techniques relating to collegiate marching band. Performance at university home football games and other on/off campus events as scheduled.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course
Upon completion of this course, students will:

  • Possess the knowledge and skills that demonstrate continued growth as an individual and ensemble performer, in both musical and visual areas, while contributing positively as ambassadors for Rutgers University and the community at large.
  • Create diverse, engaging, and entertaining performances.
  • Strengthen positive and nurturing collaborative relationships within the marching band and Rutgers University community.
  • Inspire creativity, collegiality, and spirit.

Instructor: Todd Nichols, toddni@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:339 University Choir

University Choir

Course Number: 07:701:339

A mixed choir that performs music of all periods and styles. Occasional performance of large works with orchestra.

1 credit(s)

07:701:344:01 Symphony Band

Symphony Band

Course Number: 07:701:344:01
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and presentation in concert of major works for wind band. Emphasis on performance techniques and enhanced/engaged listening skills within a large wind band ensemble.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pending successful placement audition each semester
Learning Goals of Course

Upon completion of the course, students will:

  • Possess the knowledge and skills to artistically contribute as an individual and ensemble musician in a high level wind band.
  • Create artistic performances that represent a high level of artistry and collaboration within the wind band
  • Analyze large ensemble performance skills through enhanced/engaged listening skills and performance techniques
  • Investigate traditional and modern wind band literature in various styles from diverse composers representing a global perspective

Instructor: Todd Nichols, toddni@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:345 Orchestra/Wind Ensemble

Orchestra/Wind Ensemble

Course Number: 07:701:345

Study and presentation in concert of major works for wind ensemble. Emphasis on performance techniques.

Registration for this ensemble is for brass/woodwinds/percussion students only.

1 credit(s)

07:701:347 Rutgers Sinfonia

Rutgers Sinfonia

Course Number: 07:701:347
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of orchestral repertoire.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pending ensemble placement audition at the beginning of each semester
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will have the knowledge and skills to demonstrate and understand orchestral technique (intonation, balance, rhythm, orchestration, uniformity of phrasing, bowing, period style, and the role of a conductor) specific to their instrument through the rehearsing and performing of orchestral repertoire.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:349 Glee Club

Glee Club

Course Number: 07:701:349

Study and performance of music for men’s voices.

1 credit(s)

07:701:353 Opera Workshop

Opera Workshop

Course Number: 07:701:353
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of operatic literature.

1 credit

Learning Goals of Course: Students will learn the fundamentals of acting for the singer. Through the technique of Viewpoints and Positioning, students will have a heightened sense of awareness of their bodies as an instrument of expression, awareness of and collaboration with the space around them, text, and other actors/performers. Students will become autonomous in the preparation of their own rep, becoming their own “directors” when confronted with new material. Students will have a more open sense of play and collaboration within a group.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students are required to learn and memorize all music/scene assignments. Students are required to attend class prepared for movement in proper attire with a generous and open spirit.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Attendance is mandatory at each class and rehearsal unless specifically not called. Rehearsal etiquette will factor in grading. Grading is also based on successful completion of class assignments and performances, generosity and collegiality to their peers, openness and effort in the study of the technique.

Instructor: John Giampietro, john.giampietro@rutgers.edu

07:701:355 Chamber Music

Chamber Music

Course Number: 07:701:355
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students will be placed in, or pre-form, ensembles consisting of 2-8 players. They will rehearse and perform repertoire as assigned, and receive 10 hours of coaching from a member of the faculty.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: Upon compleation of this course, students will have developed skills including score study, rehearsal technique, musical interpretation, ensemble playing, and personal interaction between musicians.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Repertoire as assigned
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on attendance, preparation, and fulfillment of a performance requirement.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:358 Stage Movement For Singers

Stage Movement For Singers

Course Number: 07:701:358

Stage Movement for Singers (1) Focus on the study of rhythm, coordination, movement vocabulary, dance positions, partner work and stage representation while incorporating Opera dance forms such as the Minuet, Waltz, Gavotte, Pas de Basque, Polonaise, etc. Readings from texts will reinforce studio class work, as well as historical background of movement.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites:

Learning Goals of Course:

As a result of class participation and successful completion of course assignments, students will be able to:

  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principles of alignment.
  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principle of use of weight.
  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principles of the use of torso.
  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principle of the use of the leg, hip rotation and feet.
  • Demonstrate increased:
    • Range of movement (flexibility) as compared to the onset of the course.
    • Muscular strength as compared to the onset of the course.
    • Musicality and response to rhythm and phrasing as compared to the onset of the course.
  • Recall, differentiate and demonstrate ballet terminology:
    • épaulement and the basic directions of the body ( ex: croisé, effacé, écarté, en face)
    • varying en tournant (ex: chaînés turns, polka turns)
    • allegro movements (ex: glissade, sauté, assemblé, jeté)
    • spatial directions
    • stage directions (downstage, upstage, stage right, stage left)
  • Identify movement forms such as Minuet, Gavotte, Polka, Schottishe, Landler, Waltz, Fox Trot, Charleston, Swing.

Instructor: Paul C. Ocampo, pocampo@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:400 Senior Recital

Senior Recital

Course Number: 07:701:400
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The capstone project for instrumental or vocal study, the recital will include a variety of repertoire, as per the requirements of their concentration.

0 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Student must be in their seventh or eighth semester of instrumental/voice or applied major lessons, depending on the requirements of their concentration.
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, the student will have displayed their mastery of the selected repertoire for an audience of their peers and faculty.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Repertoire as assigned
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on the level of mastery displayed in the performance.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:401 Woodwind Pedagogy

Woodwind Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:701:401
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Supervised by the appropriate faculty, senior performance majors study pedagogical methods and materials and teach private lessons to non-majors or music education students learning a secondary instrument. Open only to senior bachelor of music performance majors, except by special permission.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to senior undergraduate performance major, except by special permission.
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will possess knowledge and skills of woodwind pedagogy focusing on teaching practices, repertory, studies, and materials for beginning through advanced woodwind students.

07:701:402 Vocal Coaching

Vocal Coaching

Course Number: 07:701:402
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Required for fourth-year undergraduate vocal performance majors, this course supplements Applied Major Lessons and includes the exploration and coaching of vocal repertory involving interpretation of music and text, historical context, and diction. It acts as a supplement to vocal performance study and should therefore cover material that comes primarily from lesson assignments, leading to juries and recitals. Between 6 and 15 works will be covered each semester.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:701:302
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, the student will have:

  • An increased mastery of diction in the various languages (instructor will guide and correct using IPA standards)
  • Gained stylistic understanding of vocal repertoire from various musical eras
  • Developed methods for pairing text and music for deeper understanding and interpretation
  • Developed their ability to integrate technical, musical and linguistic concerns for performance

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Diction for Singers by Joan Wall and Robert Caldwell
  • Interpretation of French Art Song by Pierre Bernac
  • The Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Book of Lieder
  • Ring of Words by Philip Miller

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading

Preparation:

  • Notes and Rhythms 25%
  • IPA and Translations 25%

Integration/Performance:

  • Integration during study 25%
  • Final performance 25%

Attendance and Participation

Students will receive 12 weekly 1-hour coachings. If the instructor has to miss, a make-up will be offered. If the student has to miss, it is in the teacher’s discretion and availability if it will be made up. A minimum of 11 are needed to complete the course. More than two late arrivals will affect the grade adversely. Students should bring current repertoire from their performance study instructors. The repertoire should be prepared to the extent that the student can be flexible with suggestions as to notes, rhythms, translations, IPA, ornamentation and performance practice.

LEARNING OUTCOMES (Assessment/Grading Criteria)

ASSESSMENT: PREPARATION

Student preparation of pitches and rhythms

Grade Range Criteria

  • A The student regularly comes fully prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in all scores.
  • B+ The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 90% of scores.
  • B The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 80% of scores.
  • C+ The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 70% of scores.
  • C The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 60% of scores.
  • D The student regularly comes poorly prepared in terms of pitches and rhythms in all scores.
  • F The student is regularly unprepared in terms of pitch and rhythm in all scores.

Student preparation of IPA and translations

Grade Range Criteria

  • A The student has written the IPA and translations in all scores.
  • B+ The student has written the IPA and translations in 90% of scores.
  • B The student has written the IPA and translations in 80% of scores.
  • C+ The student has written the IPA and translations in 70% of scores.
  • C The student has written the IPA and translations in 60% of scores.
  • D The student regularly comes poorly prepared in terms of IPA and translations in all scores.
  • F The student is regularly unprepared in terms of IPA and translations in all scores.

ASSESSMENT: INTEGRATION AND PERFORMANCE

Student’s ability to Integrate the material during study

Grade Range Criteria

  • A Integration is at a very high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it within the lesson.
  • B+ Integration is at a high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it between the lessons.
  • B Integration is at a high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it between the lessons.
  • C+ Integration is at an average level; student is able to receive some constructive criticism and apply it over time to most repertoire, though with some difficulty.
  • C Integration is at an average level; student is able to receive some constructive criticism and apply it over time to some of the repertoire with difficulty.
  • D Integration is below average; student is unable to receive constructive criticism and apply it over time to most of the repertoire.
  • F Integration is poor; student is unable to receive constructive criticism and apply it over time to the repertoire.

Student’s artistic results

Grade Range Criteria

  • A Final performance of all repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • B+ Final performance of 90% of repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • B Final performance of 80% of repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • C+ Final performance of at least 80% of repertoire is at an artistically average level, showing some integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • C Final performance of at least 70% of repertoire is at an artistically average level, showing some integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • D Final performance of most scores shows little or no integration of musicianship, language and technique.
  • F Final performance of all scores shows no integration of musicianship, language and technique.

Instructor: Barbara González-Palmer, bgp@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:403 String Pedagogy

String Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:701:403
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Supervised by the appropriate faculty, senior performance majors study pedagogical methods and materials and teach private lessons to nonmajors or music education students learning a secondary instrument. Open only to senior bachelor of music performance majors, except by special permission.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Completion of six semesters of Applied Major Lesson
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, the student will have displayed the ability to explain and demonstrate the fundamental techniques of their instrument, and guide their student through repertoire and etudes appropriate to a beginner on that instrument.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: As assigned- typically materials from the Suzuki Method.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading is based on the orderly completion of the required number of lessons, culminating in a demonstration lesson observed by a faculty member.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:407 20th and 21st Century Performance Practice

20th and 21st Century Performance Practice

Course Number: 07:701:407
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of contemporary music.

1 credits

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will have knowledge of repertoire, composers, techniques, and context for music of the 20th and 21st centuries and a sense of confidence and fluidity with performing music of the 20th and 21st centuries and the ability to apply this to all musical styles and time periods. Students will be able to effectively communicate and connect with audiences about the repertoire they perform, to discover new possibilities in music that the composer had never considered when creating it, to explore the process of musical creation and deep listening, to improvise something from scratch, and to dig deeper and beyond the performer’s role of interpreting from the score.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:409 Composition Senior Recital

Composition Senior Recital

Course Number: 07:701:409

0 credit(s)

07:701:413 Percussion Pedagogy

Percussion Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:701:413

Supervised by the appropriate faculty, senior performance majors study pedagogical methods and materials and teach private lessons to non-majors or music education students learning a secondary instrument. Open only to senior bachelor of music performance majors, except by special permission.

1 credit(s)

07:701:415 Voice Pedagogy

Voice Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:701:415
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In the first semester, senior performance or music education majors study human anatomy as it applies to the singing voice, as well as pedagogical writings, and observe in various voice studios; in the second semester, students teach private lessons to non-majors or music education students learning a secondary instrument and are supervised by the instructor. Open only to senior bachelor of music performance or music education majors, except by special permission.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:701:376; Open to School 07 only or by instructor permission
Learning Goals of Course:

  • To learn how the human voice is constructed and how it functions most efficiently.
  • To learn how to identify physical problems with the human voice and what to do about them.
  • To observe various faculty teaching voice lessons and acquire teaching skills.
  • To begin to systematically identify problems with vocal technique and provide solutions for improved singing.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Required: Singing: The Mechanism and the Technic by Willilam Vennard (2nd edition); Cantabile by Kathrin Rundus

Recommended: Visible Body Respiratory app; Vocal Folds app by Bluetree Publishing.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Exams – 3 during the course of the semester, one for each unit. The final (3rd) exam is given during finals week, usually taken in person.

Assignments – due on the day indicated on the syllabus. No late assignments are accepted. In case of illness, the student may submit the assignment via instructor email or by having a classmate hand it in.

Observations – 3 handed in by midterm for perusal. All 6 handed in by the end of the semester for grading.

Attendance – students are expected to be in class on time each week. However, grading is not based on attendance nor affected by it unless the student misses an important in-class assignment.

Grading – University standards for A-F apply. Class grading is explained in the grading rubric posted on Canvas.

Instructor: Judith Nicosia, jnicosia@mgsa.rutgers.edu, civitano@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:451 Studio Accompaniment

Studio Accompaniment

Course Number: 07:701:451
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Piano accompaniment in a vocal or non-piano instrumental studio studying the repertoire of the student with whom the accompanist is paired.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: Four semesters of large ensemble and 07:701:351, 352.
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will acquire the necessary skills of collaboration with another musician. Students will be able to engage in analytical, performance, and pedagogical aspects of vocal or instrumental repertoire.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Repertoire studied by assigned vocalist or instrumentalist
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance at 10 lessons is required.
  • Assignments: repertoire assigned by the professor of assigned studio.
  • Grading is based on attendance, preparation, and successful performance at a jury or recital.

Instructor: Karina Bruk, bruk@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:459 Keyboard Pedagogy

Keyboard Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:701:459
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Supervised by the appropriate faculty, senior performance majors study pedagogical methods and materials and teach private lessons to non-majors or music education students learning a secondary instrument. Open only to senior bachelor of music performance majors, except by special permission.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:701:459 is a prerequisite to 07:701:460.
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge and skills to teach applied piano lessons to beginner and intermediate students.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Course materials include scores and other materials that are appropriate given the abilities of the students being taught. Students in the course may also be expected to obtain pedagogical method books.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Students’ teaching is observed by their own faculty applied lesson instructor, who provides assessments and evaluations.

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:701:499 Individual Study

Individual Study

Course Number: 07:701:499

Topic and goals determined in consultation with the instructor.

BA credits

08:702:502 Art Song Repertoire

Art Song Repertoire

Course Number: 08:702:502
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of 19th- and 20th-century art songs, often with a focus on a particular segment of the repertoire. Includes historical development and discussion of composers and poets, research papers, assigned readings, and listening assignments. In-class performances.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Course is available only to graduate voice majors and others with instructor permission.

Learning Goals of Course: After taking this course, students will have detailed knowledge of an important segment of the art song repertoire and will be able to approach performance and scholarship of these and similar works with a strong comprehensive foundation.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:Scores and texts assigned as relevant to the semester’s unique focus.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Students are evaluated on their attendance, participation in discussion, the quality of their research papers and listening assignments and on their in-class performances.

Instructor: Judith Nicosia, jnicosia@mgsa.rutgers.edu, civitano@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:702:506 Writing About Music

Writing About Music

Course Number: 08:702:506
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

A proseminar that offers graduate music students (primarily those for whom English is a learned language) practice in the language and discourses of academic writing as they develop and revise a series of essays. This class serves a purpose to prepare students for advanced seminars in their respective degrees and for their professional lives by helping to comprehend and engage with complex readings; articulate independent arguments; and support them through textual engagement, organized ideas, and clear, incisive prose. This course is an addition to the regular requirement and is based on the results of the examination taken at the graduate audition.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Following this course, students will be prepared to engage in the reading and writing expectations of graduate-level academic work in the Music Department.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Course materials are distributed by the instructor.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Assessment of improvement and readiness for graduate-level work is made based on class discussions demonstrating understanding of reading excerpts and a series of written assignments.

Instructor: Anthony Alms, aalms@english.rutgers.edu

08:702:510 Special Study in Piano Repertoire II

Special Study in Piano Repertoire II

Course Number: 08:702:510
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

An in-depth study of the core literature for the keyboard instruments including works for solo piano and piano and orchestra from the late romantic period to present times. Includes intensive study and performance of works by major composers and their contemporaries. Explores the evolution of the piano as a solo and as an ensemble instrument.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: This course is open to graduate-level piano students and others only with permission of the instructor.

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will gain an increased knowledge and familiarity with the music for piano written since 1900.
  • Students will deepen their insight into a great diversity of works from throughout this history of the Western music tradition and will understand long-term stylistic trends as well as the unique characteristics of individual composers.
  • Students will develop their abilities to readily apply this knowledge when analyzing or discussing questions relevant to the subject matter of the course.
  • Students will practice and improve their skills in tasks relevant to their degree study, including score identification, presentation skills, expository and analytical writing, conversational skills, etc.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Kirby, F.E., Music for Piano: A Short History
  • Gordon, Stewart, A History of Keyboard Literature: Music for the piano and its Forerunners
  • Burge, David, Twentieth-Century Piano Music

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance and active participation 25%
  • 10 Listening/Sight Reading Journals 20%
  • In-class Presentation 15%
  • Essay 20%
  • “Graded Conversation” Final Exam 20%
  • 3 additional Listening/Sight Reading Journals 3% Extra credit

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:702:519 Jazz Historiography I

Jazz Historiography I

Course Number: 08:702:519
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course explores the historiography of jazz: the ways in which history of jazz has been constructed, the voices that have told the story and those whose views have been silenced, and the issues that appear to be absent from the narrative commonly told. Engaging with standard narratives of jazz history, but expanding our view beyond those, students will use their own research to offer thoughtful revisions to our current understanding and contribute newfound knowledge to the discussion through critical inquiry. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence in Jazz Historiography and is required from Mason Gross School of the Arts (MGSA) jazz M.M. students. It is open to graduate students in other MGSA music programs as an elective.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: At the completion of the course, students will have developed critical and creative reflective thinking through writing assignments and class discussions that document their thinking on topics related to assigned readings, listening assignments, structured questions, and discoveries made as part of the process of inquiry.

Students will be able to mindfully articulate their personal reactions to assigned readings and musical examples in the form of response papers that aim to reflect their own in-depth analysis and interpretation.

Students will conduct rigorous research into the history of jazz and complete a final research paper on an original topic.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Jazz Among the Discourses by Krin Gabbard (ed.): Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1995
  • Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies by Robert G. O’Meally, Brent Hayes Edwards and Farah Jasmine Griffin (eds.); New York: Columbia University Press, 2004
  • Riffs and Choruses: A New Jazz Anthology by Andrew Clark (ed.); London and New York: Continuum, 2001

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Assigned Readings, Class Participation, and Attendance 25%
  • Group Research Work / Presentations 25%
  • Two 6-page Response Papers on Different Assigned Readings 25%
  • Final Paper (10 pages plus bibliography and discography) 25%

Instructor: Anthony D.J. Branker, ab782@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:702:525 Seminar in Jazz Arrangement & Composition

Seminar in Jazz Arrangement & Composition

Course Number: 08:702:525
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Intensive study of jazz arranging and composition. Score study and analysis, transcriptions and arranging for small and large ensembles, and commercial arranging.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites:

Learning Goals of Course: Graduate Seminar in Jazz Composition and Arranging I is designed to introduce students to the essential creative elements of contemporary music writing using structures that can guide the process. A fundamental overview of jazz writing is presented to inspire new writers within the jazz vocabulary and better appreciate contributions from the great masters. The course seeks to emphasize how the creative process, though seemingly abstract or elusive at times, can be aided by techniques to spur on inventiveness and expressiveness. Students will become familiar with principles used in scores to organize the composers’ thoughts and to leverage basic building blocks, as found in the great works of the past. To remain timely, an emphasis is placed on real-world writing opportunities, learning to produce scores quickly to meet typically short deadlines as well as preparing works for publication.

At the completion of the course, students will possess the needed skills to efficiently produce high-quality, publisher-ready jazz compositions and arrangements, possessing good form and balance, in a timely manner as is often required in today’s fast-paced market.

Summary of Main Learning Outcomes

  • To develop literacy in modern jazz arranging and composition, and musical notation
  • To present a practical project-oriented approach and balance theory with application
  • To approach the writing process in a more efficient and organized manner
  • To learn to score more quickly, as dictated by today’s musical marketplace
  • To overcome common writing blocks and traps that waste time and hinders progress
  • To incorporate technology into the composing and arranging process
  • To assemble a body of written work and create a usable portfolio
  • To build familiarity and confidence with modern notation software

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Blank Manuscript pads
  • Jazz Scores and Analysis, Vol.1, Rick Lawn, ISBN-10 : 0997661739
  • The Shaping Forces in Music, Ernst Toch (Dover Publications, Inc, 2011 or newer), ISBN-10 : 0486233464

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Assignments:

  • Topical application assignments
  • Composition Projects
  • Major exam projects and weekly progress submissions
  • Current-event Reading/Journaling assignments

Grading:

  • Attendance/Participation – 25%
  • Assignments/Homework/Quizzes – 25%
  • Major Exam Projects – 50%

Instructor: Marc J. Stasio, marc.stasio@rutgers.edu

08:702:551 Instrumental Literature

Instrumental Literature

Course Number: 08:702:551
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The course is an overview of chamber and larger ensemble literature with focus on one of the following categories, varied by semester: woodwind literature, string literature, brass and percussion literature. Each of these are considered from early emergence during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The development of these ensembles – from the Baroque period to the present – will be illustrated through the study of distinctive musical characteristics that identify works as belonging to a particular composer, genre, period, or style. Articles on such style characteristics, along with illustrative music examples, will serve as the basis for class discussions. The course will be presented with an eye towards preparing the graduate student for comprehensive exams.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Course is open to graduate students whose concentrations align with the semester’s concentration (Woodwind Chamber Literature, String Chamber Literature, Brass and Percussion Chamber Literature).

Learning Goals of Course: Following this course, students should have a good foundational knowledge of the repertoire of the current semester’s concentration and also be well-oriented to continue their studies in preparing for written comprehensive exams

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Materials and scores selected each semester according to the repertoire concentration.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Students are graded according to attendance, participation, engagement with weekly assignments, and a term paper.

Instructor: David Chapman, dchapman@rutgers.edu

08:702:553 Wind Literature

Wind Literature

Course Number: 08:702:553
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The course is a review of literature for winds and brass from antiquity to the present and will focus on both small-ensemble and large concert-band repertoire. Mixed in along the way are techniques for performance. Intended for MM and DMA students who might find themselves teaching college-level courses in the future.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Course is available to graduate-level woodwind, brass, percussion, and band conducting students and to others with permission by the instructor.

Learning Goals of Course: Following this course, students will have a good foundational knowledge of the major small- and large-ensemble band repertoire and also will be well-oriented to continue their studies in preparing for written comprehensive exams.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Materials and scores selected each semester according to the repertoire concentration.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Students are graded according to attendance, participation, engagement with weekly assignments, and a term paper.

Instructor: David Chapman, dchapman@rutgers.edu

08:702:597 Practical Training in Teaching

Practical Training in Teaching

Course Number: 08:702:597
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Students register for this course when engaging in teaching work that is associated with their major area of study, including work that satisfies the DMA Pedagogical Component requirement. This course is designed to promote engagement in the teaching work in a manner that supports the student’s academic studies.

0 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: This course is available to graduate students who are engaged in teaching work, either towards satisfaction of the DMA pedagogical component or outside of curricular requirements.

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will be able to approach teaching with skills derived from practical experience.
  • Students will be better equipped to set pedagogical goals and establish long-term plans for their own students.
  • Students will adopt a self-reflective approach to their own teaching, allowing them to continue development as teachers throughout their careers.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Students are evaluated on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis according to their completion of a goals statement and a self-assessment.

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:702:600 Research in Music

Research in Music

Course Number: 08:702:600

Individual research in selected areas of music history, theory, performance practice, or music education.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

08:702:603 Lecture-Recital Advisement

Lecture-Recital Advisement

Course Number: 08:702:603
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Independent research undertaken in connection with the required lecture-recital. The project culminates with an extensive paper toward completion of the DMA in performance and conducting.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: This course is available only to DMA students during the period of research on the Lecture-Recital Project.

Learning Goals of Course: Students will complete a major document resulting from their research.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: None

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Assessment of the final Lecture-Recital Project, including accompanying paper.

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:702:702 Dissertation: Research in Music Education

Dissertation: Research in Music Education

Course Number: 08:702:702
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Dissertation research is an independent research course for advanced DMA students in music education who are completing their dissertation proposal, dissertation data collection, or final dissertation writing. Each student will work independently with their advisor each semester to establish goals and objectives for the semester to ensure adequate progress toward degree.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course:
As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • Make progress toward completion of his/her dissertation research.
  • Develop and advance skills as an academic scholar in music education.
  • Other individualized objectives as determined in consultation with instructor.

Instructor: Stephanie Cronenberg, scronenberg@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Brandon Williams, bwilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:702:800 Matriculation Continued Online

Matriculation Continued Online

Course Number: 08:702:800
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction:

Students register for Matriculation Continued when taking a leave of absence from the MM, DMA, or AD programs.

0 credit(s)

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:501 Helix! New Music Ensemble

Helix! New Music Ensemble

Course Number: 08:703:501
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Helix! is a 16-piece new music ensemble comprising string quintet, wind and brass quartets, percussion, harp and piano. The ensemble explores important chamber ensemble repertoire of the 20th and 21st centuries alongside world premieres of student and faculty composers. The ensemble performs at Rutgers and frequently at LPR (Le Poisson Rouge in NYC).

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Graduate students are assigned to Helix! each year following entrance auditions or ensemble auditions. Students wishing to participate for credit should contact the instructor via email before fall semester begins.

Learning Goals of Course: It is expected that students will gain an increased appreciation of contemporary music and be introduced to composers not previously encountered. It is also expected students will gain increased rhythmic skills and benefit from mastering and applying advanced instrumental techniques often required in new music.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Music as assigned by instructor

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grades will be awarded based on attendance. Any unexcused absence will result in the lowering of a grade by one whole letter. Two tardies equals one absence. Grades will also be judged based on level of preparation, quality of participation, and concert execution.

Instructor: Kynan Johns, kdjohns@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:503 RU Baroque Players

RU Baroque Players

Course Number: 08:703:503
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

An ensemble dedicated to the historically-informed performance of early music.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

  • By participating in the ensemble, students will develop skills for the performance and interpretation of early music (before ca. 1800) according to historically-informed performance practice, and become familiar with the conventions of the styles of music studied during the semester.
  • Students will gain facility working with period-instrument equipment.
  • Students will cultivate the sense of collaboration and creativity that comes from small-ensemble work.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students will have access to school-owned period instruments and equipment.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Performance in the semester final concert is mandatory.

Instructor: Albert Bellefeuille, atb124@rutgers.edu

08:703:505 Studio Accompaniment

Studio Accompaniment

Course Number: 08:703:505
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Piano accompaniment in a vocal or non-piano instrumental studio studying the repertoire of the student with whom the pianist is paired.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will acquire higher level of skills of collaboration with another musician. Students will engage in analytical, performance, and pedagogical aspects of vocal or instrumental repertoire.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Repertoire studied by assigned vocalist or instrumentalist

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Attendance at 10 lessons is required.
  • Repertoire assigned by the professor of assigned studio.
  • Grading is based on attendance, preparation, and successful performance at a jury or recital.

Instructor: Karina Bruk, bruk@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:506 Grad Perform Lesson

Grad Perform Lesson

Course Number: 08:703:506

BA credit(s)

08:703:511 Rutgers University Kirkpatrick Choir

Rutgers University Kirkpatrick Choir

Course Number: 08:703:511

1 credit(s)

08:703:521 Jazz Ensemble

Jazz Ensemble

Course Number: 08:703:521
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Exploration and performance of traditional and contemporary jazz for a large ensemble.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

The main learning outcomes seek to develop core strengths in:

  • Sight-reading
  • Section playing
  • Ensemble precision
  • Improvisational skills
  • Knowledge of diverse styles.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • 50% – Performance Preparedness and Practicing Level
  • 25% – Ensemble and Jazz Studio Day Participation, Attendance, & Agreement Deadlines
  • 25% – Sectional Rehearsals

Instructor: Conrad Herwig, cherwig@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:523 Orchestra

Orchestra

Course Number: 08:703:523
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of major orchestral repertoire. Registration for this course number is for string students only.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pending ensemble placement audition at the beginning of each semester

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to rehearse and perform symphonic and operatic works and to play parts for their instrument required in professional auditions.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:525 Percussion Ensemble

Percussion Ensemble

Course Number: 08:703:525

1 credit(s)

08:703:527 Brass Ensemble

Brass Ensemble

Course Number: 08:703:527

1 credit(s)

08:703:530 Vocal Coaching

Vocal Coaching

Course Number: 08:703:530
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

One-on-one coaching of advanced vocal repertory involving interpretation, style, diction, and integration in performance. This course acts as a supplement to graduate vocalists’ voice lessons (performance study), and should therefore cover material that primarily comes from those assignments leading to the degree’s required jury and recital performances.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Graduate level vocal study

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion to the course, the student will have:

  • Advanced understanding of diction within the assigned repertoire
  • A nuanced understanding of the styles in which they are working
  • Practiced methods for pairing text and music for deeper understanding and interpretation
  • Demonstrated the integration of technical, musical and linguistic concerns toward advanced, informed, and authentic performance

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Individualized depending on the assigned repertoire and the research accompanying it.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading

  • Preparation:
  • Notes and Rhythms 25%
  • IPA and Translations 25%
  • Integration/Performance:
  • Integration during study 25%
  • Final performance 25%

Attendance and Participation

Students will receive 12 weekly 1-hour coachings. If the instructor has to miss, a make-up will be offered. If the student has to miss, it is in the teacher’s discretion and availability if it will be made up. A minimum of 11 are needed to complete the course. More than two late arrivals will affect the grade adversely. Students should bring current repertoire from their performance study instructors. The repertoire should be prepared to the extent that the student can be flexible with suggestions as to notes, rhythms, translations, IPA, ornamentation and performance practice.

Assessment: Preparation

  • Student preparation of pitches and rhythms
    • Grade Range Criteria
      • A The student regularly comes fully prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in all scores.
      • B+ The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 90% of scores.
      • B The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 80% of scores.
      • C+ The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 70% of scores.
      • C The student regularly comes prepared with correct pitches and rhythms in 60% of scores.
      • D The student regularly comes poorly prepared in terms of pitches and rhythms in all scores.
      • F The student is regularly unprepared in terms of pitch and rhythm in all scores.
  • Student preparation of IPA and translations
    • Grade Range Criteria
      • A The student has written the IPA and translations in all scores.
      • B+ The student has written the IPA and translations in 90% of scores.
      • B The student has written the IPA and translations in 80% of scores.
      • C+ The student has written the IPA and translations in 70% of scores.
      • C The student has written the IPA and translations in 60% of scores.
      • D The student regularly comes poorly prepared in terms of IPA and translations in all scores.
      • F The student is regularly unprepared in terms of IPA and translations in all scores.

Assessment: Integration and Performance

  • Student’s ability to Integrate the material during study
    • Grade Range Criteria
      • A Integration is at a very high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it within the lesson.
      • B+ Integration is at a high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it between the lessons.
      • B Integration is at a high level; student is able to receive constructive criticism and apply it between the lessons.
      • C+ Integration is at an average level; student is able to receive some constructive criticism and apply it over time to most repertoire, though with some difficulty.
      • C Integration is at an average level; student is able to receive some constructive criticism and apply it over time to some of the repertoire with difficulty.
      • D Integration is below average; student is unable to receive constructive criticism and apply it over time to most of the repertoire.
      • F Integration is poor; student is unable to receive constructive criticism and apply it over time to the repertoire.
  • Student’s artistic results
    • Grade Range Criteria
      • A Final performance of all repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
      • B+ Final performance of 90% of repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
      • B Final performance of 80% of repertoire is at an artistically high level, showing full integration of musicianship, language and technique.
      • C+ Final performance of at least 80% of repertoire is at an artistically average level, showing some integration of musicianship, language and technique.
      • C Final performance of at least 70% of repertoire is at an artistically average level, showing some integration of musicianship, language and technique.
      • D Final performance of most scores shows little or no integration of musicianship, language and technique.
      • F Final performance of all scores shows no integration of musicianship, language and technique.

Instructor: Barbara González-Palmer, bgp@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:531 Jazz Ensemble II

Jazz Ensemble II

Course Number: 08:703:531
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Exploration and performance of traditional and contemporary jazz for a large ensemble.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

The main learning outcomes seek to develop core strengths in:

  • Sight-reading
  • Section playing
  • Ensemble precision
  • Improvisational skills
  • Knowledge of diverse styles.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • 50% – Performance Preparedness and Practicing Level
  • 25% – Ensemble and Jazz Studio Day Participation, Attendance, & Agreement Deadlines
  • 25% – Sectional Rehearsals

Instructor: Abraham Burton, aburton@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:533 Voorhees Choir

Voorhees Choir

Course Number: 08:703:533
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The Rutgers Voorhees Choir is a soprano-alto ensemble that performs a repertory of challenging and engaging music. They present one main concert per semester and smaller performances as Rutgers and Douglass College ambassadors. The Rutgers Voorhees Choir is a performance course designed to develop singing technique and music reading skills and improve knowledge in the essential elements of choral music and public performance.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

As a result of this course, students will:

  • Sing a variety of soprano-alto repertoire, alone or in small groups, while demonstrating mastery of their vocal part, vocal technique, and musical expression appropriate to the musical style.
  • Reflect on and evaluate their performance.
  • Participate in musical activities designed to stimulate aesthetic responses.
  • Develop performance skills that foster self-confidence.

Instructor: Brandon Williams, bwilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:535 Graduate Diction: English

Graduate Diction: English

Course Number: 08:703:535
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

An advanced exploration of the English language as found in opera and art song. Students will do this through written and performance assignments including IPA exercises, class presentations, text oration, and singing. Special attention will be given to the dramatic and artistic qualities of the text, and how to carry those qualities into an emotionally authentic, communicative, and artistic lyric performance.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prior diction study at the undergraduate level, including a basic understanding of the International Phonetic Alphabet

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

  • A nuanced understanding and application of the International Phonetic Alpabet (IPA) for American Standard (AS) and British Received Pronunciation (RP)
  • Increased their skills in using English idiomatically within assigned repertoire
  • Acquired methods to uncover their authentic ‘voice’ using the sound and drama of text
  • Improved artistic communication through the thoughtful synthesis of text and music

Required and Recommended Course Materials:Recommended:

  • Diction for Singers (Joan Wall)
  • Singing and Communicating in English (Kathryn Labouff)

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course evaluation

  • Preparation for in-class performances, including items listed under assignments below (40%)
  • IPA quizzes (10%)
  • In-class presentation (20%)
  • Final performance (20%)
  • Final IPA exam (10%)

Assignment preparation

  • Performance of arias and songs:
  • Repertoire will be determined in consultation with the instructor.
  • Students will prepare their scores to a level where they can be flexible while being coached in class. This is an exploration, so a willing spirit is a must!
  • One week prior to performance, provide the instructor a physical photocopy of the score with YOUR IPA symbols written above or below the text in the music (i.e. don’t use a print-out with someone else’s IPA).
  • One week prior to performance, provide the instructor a photocopy of the text alone in its original form (prose, poetry, no IPA).
  • Be able to communicate your understanding of the poetry or contextualize the aria within the storyline.
  • In-class presentations:
  • Topic will be chosen by the instructor (likely a comparative IPA task)
  • Presentation will be about 20 minutes, and should include a description of the rules, examples, exceptions (as applicable), a discussion on how to physically form the sounds, and a class exercise.

Grading for assignments

  • A Student demonstrates a superior level of preparation and understanding and is able to be flexible in experimentation with language and performance.
  • B+ Student demonstrates a high level of preparation and understanding and is able to be somewhat flexible in experimentation with language and performance.
  • B Student demonstrates a moderate level of preparation and understanding and is able to be somewhat flexible in experimentation with language and performance.
  • C+ Student demonstrates a lower level of preparation and understanding and struggles to be flexible in experimentation with language and performance.
  • C Student demonstrates a low level of preparation and understanding and struggles to be flexible in experimentation with language and performance.
  • D/F Student demonstrates a lack of preparation and understanding and is inflexible in experimentation with language and performance.

Instructor: Barbara González-Palmer, bgp@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:539 University Choir

University Choir

Course Number: 08:703:539

1 credit(s)

08:703:544:01 Symphony Band

Symphony Band

Course Number: 08:703:544:01
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and presentation in concert of major works for wind band. Emphasis on performance techniques and enhanced/engaged listening skills within a large wind band ensemble.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pending successful placement audition each semester

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will:

  • Possess the knowledge and skills to artistically contribute as an individual and ensemble musician in a high level wind band.
  • Create artistic performances that represent a high level of artistry and collaboration within the wind band
  • Analyze large ensemble performance skills through enhanced/engaged listening skills and performance techniques
  • Investigate traditional and modern wind band literature in various styles from diverse composers representing a global perspective

Instructor: Todd Nichols, toddni@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:545 Orchestra/Wind Ensemble

Orchestra/Wind Ensemble

Course Number: 08:703:545

1 credit(s)

08:703:547 Rutgers Sinfonia

Rutgers Sinfonia

Course Number: 08:703:547
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of orchestral repertoire.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pending ensemble placement audition at the beginning of each semester

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will have the knowledge and skills to demonstrate and understand orchestral technique (intonation, balance, rhythm, orchestration, uniformity of phrasing, bowing, period style, and the role of a conductor) specific to their instrument through the rehearsing and performing of orchestral repertoire.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:549 Glee Club

Glee Club

Course Number: 08:703:549

1 credit(s)

08:703:551 Bassoon Reed Making

Bassoon Reed Making

Course Number: 08:703:551
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Elective weekly class providing instruction and guidance in bassoon reed making, including instruction in appropriate tools and techniques.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Students must be enrolled, as a co-requisite, in at least one of the following: 07:701:175, 07:701:176, 07:701:275, 07:701:276, 07:701:375, 07:701:376, 07:701:475, 07:701:476, 08:703:575, 08:703:576, 08:703:675, 08:703:676, 08:703:701, 08:703:702

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to make and adjust their own reeds. They will be able to understand and have fluency with every step of the reed making process. They will be able to name the parts of the reed and explain their function, identify the major reed making tools and their function, properly form a bassoon reed blank, compare and contrast dull and sharp reed making knives, discuss how variations in color, grain, shape, and density of cane can affect the finished bassoon reed, demonstrate proper knife sharpening technique, and identify and evaluate unbalanced reeds and articulate the appropriate corrective actions, and apply the proper processing techniques to produce a functional bassoon reed.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:552 Oboe Reed Making

Oboe Reed Making

Course Number: 08:703:552
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Elective weekly class providing instruction and guidance in oboe reed making, including instruction in appropriate tools and techniques.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Students must be enrolled, as a co-requisite, in at least one of the following: 07:701:175, 07:701:176, 07:701:275, 07:701:276, 07:701:375, 07:701:376, 07:701:475, 07:701:476, 08:703:575, 08:703:576, 08:703:675, 08:703:676, 08:703:701, 08:703:702

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to make and adjust their own reeds, understand and have fluency with every step of the reedmaking process, name the parts of the reed and explain their function, identify the major reed making tools and their function, properly tie an oboe reed, compare and contrast dull and sharp reed making knives, discuss how variations in color, grain, shape, thickness of wall, and diameter of cane can affect the finished oboe reed, demonstrate proper knife sharpening technique, identify and evaluate unbalanced reeds and articulate the appropriate corrective actions, apply the proper processing techniques – splitting, guillotining, planning, gouging, shaping, tying, knife sharpening, scraping, and clipping – to produce a functional oboe reed.

Instructor: Maureen Hurd, mlhurd@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:553 Opera Workshop

Opera Workshop

Course Number: 08:703:553
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of operatic literature.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Students will learn the fundamentals of acting for the singer. Through the technique of Viewpoints and Positioning, students will have a heightened sense of awareness of their bodies as an instrument of expression, awareness of and collaboration with the space around them, text, and other actors/performers. Students will become autonomous in the preparation of their own rep, becoming their own ‘directors’ when confronted with new material. Students will have a more open sense of play and collaboration within a group.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students are required to learn and memorize all music/scene assignments. Students are required to attend class prepared for movement in proper attire with a generous and open spirit.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Attendance is mandatory at each class and rehearsal unless specifically not called. Rehearsal etiquette will factor in grading. Grading is also based on: successful completion of class assignments and performances, generosity and collegiality to their peers, openness and effort in the study of the technique.

Instructor: John Giampietro, john.giampietro@rutgers.edu

08:703:558 Stage Movement For Singers

Stage Movement For Singers

Course Number: 08:703:558

2 credit(s)

08:703:563 Conducting

Conducting

Course Number: 08:703:563

3 credit(s)

08:703:599 Independent Study

Independent Study

Course Number: 08:703:599
Course Format: Other

Topic and goals determined in consultation with the instructor.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Determined by student and instructor in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator.

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:600 Advanced Performance Study

Advanced Performance Study

Course Number: 08:703:600

3 credit(s)

08:703:601 Performance Project

Performance Project

Course Number: 08:703:601
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Master’s degree recitals and Opera Studies role preparation.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: MM students register for this course in the semester in which they give their degree recital. Opera Studies students register for this course in semesters during which they prepare roles for upcoming opera productions.

Learning Goals of Course: Students will prepare and present performances commensurate with their degree levels.

Instructor: Robert Grohman, rgrohman@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:619 Jazz Chamber Ensemble

Jazz Chamber Ensemble

Course Number: 08:703:619
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The emphasis of the Chamber Jazz Ensemble course is to prepare the student for a career as a successful performer by rehearsing, performing, and gaining exposure to standard jazz repertoire in small group format.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

The main learning outcomes seek to develop core strengths in:

  • Sight-reading
  • Section playing
  • Ensemble precision
  • Improvisational skills
  • Knowledge of diverse styles.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • 50% – Performance Preparedness and Practicing Level
  • 25% – Ensemble Participation and Attendance
  • 25% – Class Assignments, Tune Contributions
08:703:663 Conducting

Conducting

Course Number: 08:703:663

3 credit(s)

08:703:701 Performance Study DMA & AD

Performance Study DMA & AD

Course Number: 08:703:701
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of repertoire, technique, and interpretation.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, the student will have attained improved mastery of solo and ensemble repertoire.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Repertoire as assigned

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading will be based on weekly progress, attendance and the performance of a jury or recital.

Instructor: Jonathan Spitz, jspitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:703:703 Conducting Study DMA & AD

Conducting Study DMA & AD

Course Number: 08:703:703

BA credit(s)

08:703:844 Research Internship

Research Internship

Course Number: 08:703:844

BA credit(s)

16:700:501 Introduction to Musical Research

Introduction to Musical Research

Course Number: 16:700:501

Introduction to bibliographical tools and research techniques for scholars and performers. The primary aims of the course are to develop a critical attitude toward the manuscripts and editions used for performance and study, as well as an understanding of the methodological issues relevant to writing about music.

3 credit(s)

16:700:504 Current Issues in Music Theory

Current Issues in Music Theory

Course Number: 16:700:504

Issues and debates within the current discipline of music theory via examination and discussion of recently published books and articles.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and graduate director.

16:700:509 Music History Review

Music History Review

Course Number: 16:700:509

3 credit(s)

16:700:511 Music History Review

Music History Review

Course Number: 16:700:511

Review of harmony (part-writing and progressions); counterpoint (two- and three-part species counterpoint, including imitation); and harmonic analysis. This course does not fulfill regular theory requirements. It serves strictly as a preparation for the graduate theory courses.

3 credit(s)

16:700:519 Pro-Seminar in Musicology

Pro-Seminar in Musicology

Course Number: 16:700:519

Intensive study of selected areas in the history of music, with guided research leading to oral and written reports.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 16:700:501

16:700:525 Study in Music Analysis

Study in Music Analysis

Course Number: 16:700:525

Study of styles and structures in compositions from the Middle Ages to the present and their relationship to ideas on composition held by composers and theorists.

3 credit(s)

16:700:525 Study in Music Analysis

Study in Music Analysis

Course Number: 16:700:525

Study of styles and structures in compositions from the Middle Ages to the present and their relationship to ideas on composition held by composers and theorists.

3 credit(s)

16:700:527 Studies in Opera

Studies in Opera

Course Number: 16:700:527

Study of selected operas. Historical background, sources, editions, textual criticism, analysis, and performance practice.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

16:700:531 Pro-Seminar in Composition

Pro-Seminar in Composition

Course Number: 16:700:531

Practice in the techniques of creative composition.

3 credit(s)

16:700:541 Special Topics: Music Theory & Analysis

Special Topics: Music Theory & Analysis

Course Number: 16:700:541

Recent developments in music theory and 20th-century analytical techniques. Topics vary from year to year.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 16:700:525,526

16:700:567 Pro-Seminar in Performance Practice

Pro-Seminar in Performance Practice

Course Number: 16:700:567

Problems of performance practice in vocal and instrumental music from two different periods: 17th and 18th centuries, and 19th century.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

16:700:603 Masters Project

Masters Project

Course Number: 16:700:603

BA credit(s)

16:700:619 Seminar in Musicology

Seminar in Musicology

Course Number: 16:700:619

3 credit(s)

16:700:631 Seminar in Composition

Seminar in Composition

Course Number: 16:700:631

3 credit(s)

16:700:701 Research in Music

Research in Music

Course Number: 16:700:701

BA credit(s)