Theater

Courses

Undergraduate Courses

07:965:211 Theater Appreciation

Theater Appreciation

Course Number: 07:965:211
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Designed for nonmajors. Students attend a wide spectrum of theater offerings: Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off-Broadway, repertory, and university theater performances and, through discussion and lectures by professional artists, gain an appreciation of performance. Theater tickets and in-class presentation fee (generally, no text is required).

3 credit(s)

Learning Goals of Course:

  1. Examine critically philosophical and other theoretical issues concerning the nature of reality, human experience, knowledge, value, and/or cultural production through exposure to contemporary theater. Students will be able to analyze and appreciate the contribution Theater makes to the public debate on social issues and values. They will develop an understanding of the theatrical methods and techniques that are used to frame the debate.
  2. Analyze the art and literature of the Theater in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures and technologies. Contemporary theater production includes a wide range of plays and topics. Depending on availability, plays of previous times and values (Shakespeare, etc.) are studied along with plays of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Histories, values and cultures are compared and contrasted in class discussions.

Instructor: Jeffrey Bender, jbender@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:215 Scenic Art

Scenic Art

Course Number: 07:965:215
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is an introductory course in basic theatrical design and production. Lectures (given twice a week) cover a wide range of topics relating to the technical, historical, and aesthetic aspects of designing scenery, costumes, and lighting for the stage.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: After participating in this course, the student will have a working knowledge of the concepts, history, and terminology related to the design and technical aspects of theatrical production.

Instructor: David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:222 Performing Solo: From Stage to YouTube Online

Performing Solo: From Stage to YouTube

Course Number: 07:965:222
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a performance-based elective course designed for students of all disciplines who wish to persuasively communicate in person or on video. If you’re scared of public speaking, then this class is a great way to find your comfort zone, from the comfort of your own home. Students will try vlogging, stand-up, monologues, narration, and even multi-character dialogue, with the help of a supportive instructor and class. Students will study these formats through lectures and by watching videos. Students will have the freedom to write their own scripts on a variety of topics important to them. Performance experience is not required to take this course. These skills are not only used in entertainment, but also in video conferencing and marketing for any profession. No matter your major or future career, this course can help you be the person who is confident, comfortable, and stands out.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goal:

  • Using theatrical performance language, students will learn to analyze the genre of solo performance in relation to the genre’s specific history and formats.
  • Students will engage critically in the process of developing original creative solo performance material by writing in multiple solo performance styles and genres, as well as giving and receiving productive critiques.
  • Students will develop communicative skills and self-awareness inherent in the process of performing their original work for the on-camera assignments.

Course Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

  • The unit lectures combined with the unit quizzes will teach students the terminology, definitions, concepts, and methodology of the Solo Performance styles and genres.
  • The performance video assignments will teach students how to verbally communicate, sort, and construct a personal speech, presentation, or performance.
  • The unit discussion assignments will teach students to compare and solve issues and questions related to topical information.
  • Giving and receiving classmate critiques on the video performances will teach students to sort and build their performance understanding and confidence.
  • The writing assignments will teach students to write, identify, and construct their thoughts through written communication.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: ## Course Assignments

These are the types of assignments you will encounter in the course:

  • Unit Lectures - lectures consist of reading the content and viewing the chosen videos within the lectures.
  • Unit Quizzes - quizzes consist of multiple-choice questions based on the content of the lectures.
  • Unit Video Assignments - the videos will be performed, recorded, edited, and uploaded by the students.
  • Each video will be seen by the instructor and fellow students. Constructive criticism will be given. The Final
  • Presentation assignment is a video assignment.
  • Unit Discussion Assignments - discussion topics will be given to the class and students will be asked to respond to the topic and each other in an online forum.
  • Unit Video Critiques - constructive criticism on fellow students' video assignments.
  • Unit Writing Assignments - creative writing assignments that are designed to help the students choose their final presentation topic and solo performance style.

Course Grading

Final Grade Percentages

  • Writing Assignments (5 total) 15%
  • Performance Video Assignments excluding Final (6 total) 30%
  • Unit Quizzes (4 total) 8%
  • Discussions (5 total) 10%
  • Presentation Pitch Research Paper (1 total) 5%
  • Critique of Classmates (6 total) 12%
  • Final Performance Presentation (1 total) 20%
  • TOTAL 100%

Instructor: Raymond McAnally, raymonmc@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:225 Creating Characters Onstage and Online

Creating Characters Onstage and Online

Course Number: 07:965:225
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a performance-based elective course designed for students of all disciplines who wish to persuasively communicate in person or on video. If you’re scared of public speaking, then this class is a great way to find your comfort zone, from the comfort of your own home. Students will try vlogging, stand-up, monologues, narration, and even multi-character dialogue, with the help of a supportive instructor and class. Students will study these formats through lectures and by watching videos. Students will have the freedom to write their own scripts on a variety of topics important to them. Performance experience is not required to take this course. These skills are not only used in entertainment, but also in video conferencing and marketing for any profession. No matter your major or future career, this course can help you be the person who is confident, comfortable, and stands out.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The goal of this course is to analyze the craft of acting in relation to specific techniques and disciplines, in order to engage critically in the process of developing original characters and creative performance material. Each student will experience the benefits of creating, writing, and performing their character work on camera, as well as giving and receiving productive critiques.

The communicative skills, behavioral study, empathy, and self-awareness learned herein will aid students in their individual fields of study and future careers. The class will focus on critical analysis of performance, artistic research of human behavior, and the ability to express one’s thoughts coherently through both verbal and written communication skills.

Objectives

  • Using theatrical performance language, students will learn to analyze a variety of acting techniques, in relation to the technique’s specific history and purpose for exploring characters.
  • Students will engage critically in the process of developing original creative performance material by writing and performing various acting techniques to create new characters, as well as giving and receiving productive critiques.
  • Students will develop communicative skills and self-awareness inherent in the process of performing their original work for the on-camera assignments.

Learning Outcomes
After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand and utilize the terminology, definitions, concepts, and methodology of the acting techniques covered in the Unit Lectures and reinforced by the Unit Quizzes.
  • Verbally communicate, sort, and construct a personal speech, presentation, or performance as learned through their experience preparing for the video assignments.
  • Compare and solve issues and questions related to topical information as learned through Unit Discussion assignments.
  • Sort and build their performance understanding and confidence by giving and receiving constructive Classmate Critiques for the course video assignments.
  • Write, identify, and construct their thoughts through writing assignments.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
These are the types of assignments you will encounter in the course:

  • Unit Lectures - lectures consist of reading the content and viewing the chosen videos within the lectures.
  • Unit Quizzes - quizzes consist of multiple-choice questions based on the content of the lectures.
  • Unit Video Assignments - the videos will be performed, recorded, edited, and uploaded by the students. Each video will be seen by the instructor and fellow students. Constructive criticism will be given. The Final Presentation assignment is a video assignment.
  • Unit Discussion Assignments - discussion topics will be given to the class and students will be asked to respond to the topic and each other in an online forum.
  • Unit Video Critiques - constructive criticism on fellow students' video assignments.
  • Unit Writing Assignments - creative writing assignments that are designed to help the students choose their final presentation topic and solo performance style.

Course Grading
Final Grade Percentages

  • Writing Assignments (5 total)15%
  • Performance Video Assignments excluding Final (6 total) 30%
  • Unit Quizzes (4 total) 8%
  • Discussions (5 total) 10%
  • Character Research Paper (1 total) 5%
  • Critique of Classmates (6 total) 12%
  • Final Performance Presentation (1 total) 20%
  • TOTAL 100%

Instructor: Raymond McAnally, raymonmc@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:230 Theater Appreciation Online

Students attend a wide spectrum of theater offerings including Broadway, off-Broadway, off-off-Broadway, regional, educational, and community events, and, through viewing those theatrical productions and online lectures, gain an appreciation of performance and everything that goes into producing theater.

3 Credits

Note: Students will not receive credit for both 07:965:230 and 07:965:211. This course does not fulfill any SAS core requirements.

07:965:231 Theater History I Online

Theater History I Online

Course Number: 07:965:231
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

The objective is to examine the traditions of primarily Western theater from its origins to the English Restoration, within the context of wider cultural and political developments.

The class focuses on the relationship of these dramatic traditions to current issues such as gender, race, power, and identity, as well as theater as a vital expression of universal human empathy.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the relationship of theater to ritual, ceremony, and performance in everyday life;
  • Compare, contrast, and interrogate theater/performance traditions through such lenses as race, gender, class, and colonialism, with a particular emphasis on centering traditionally marginalized/ignored/oppressed voices; 
  • Identify shifting historical approaches to theater production and performance;
  • Distinguish between different dramatic genres and styles, and identify their historical evolution.

Learning Outcomes

  • Construct coherent, analytical, critical written arguments that synthesize course concepts;
  • Demonstrate close engagement with course readings and comprehension of course concepts and facts;
  • Critically and creatively engage with other students via select assignments.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
Over the semester, the student will submit:

  • One video introduction
  • Eleven weekly open-book quizzes on the readings (lecture plus any additional readings)
  • One Visual Connections assignment
  • One closed-book Overview Exam
  • One Life Connections Assignment

Note: There are NO extra-credit assignments for this class.

Course Grading
Note: Please see the Assessment Rubrics page in the Course Essentials modules for further details.

Final Grade Calculation (Assignment Percentage)

  • Life Connections 40%
  • Overview Exam 25%
  • Weekly Quizzes (11 total) 30% (2.72% each)
  • Visual Connections 4%
  • Introduction Video 1%

Instructor: David Letwin, dpletwin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:232 Theater History II Online

Theater History II Online

Course Number: 07:965:232
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Theater II picks up where the first class leaves off and takes us to the present time.

A survey of key theater developments, concepts, and trends, primarily Western, from the 18th Century to the present, within the broader context of emergent modernity, the crises this radical change produced, and the range of artistic responses to this new — and destabilizing — reality.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the relationship of theater to ritual, ceremony, and performance in everyday life;
  • Compare, contrast, and interrogate theater/performance traditions through such lenses as race, gender, class, modernity, and colonialism, with a particular emphasis on centering traditionally marginalized/ignored/oppressed voices;
  • Identify shifting historical approaches to theater production and performance;
  • Distinguish between different dramatic genres and styles, and identify their historical evolution.

Learning Outcomes

  • Construct coherent, analytical, critical written arguments that synthesize course concepts;
  • Demonstrate close engagement with course readings and comprehension of course concepts and facts;
  • Critically and creatively engage with other students via select assignments.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: In addition to what is already posted on the Canvas course site (weekly lectures and links to some of the plays), you will need to pick up one book and several plays that are not in the public domain. Please see the "Weekly Supplemental Readings List" page in the "Course Essentials" module for details. 
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
Over the semester, the student will:

  • One video introduction
  • Eleven weekly open-book quizzes on the readings (lecture plus any additional readings)
  • One Visual Connection assignment
  • Two discussions assignments 
  • One closed-book Overview Exam
  • One Blog/Paper Assignment

Note: There are NO extra-credit assignments for this class.

Grading
Note: Please see the Assessment Rubrics page in the Course Essentials modules for further details.

Final Course Grade Calculation (Assignment Percentage)

  • Blog/Paper 30%
  • Discussion Threads (2 total) 30% (15% each)
  • Overview Exam 21%
  • Weekly Quizzes (11 total) 15% (1.36% each)
  • Visual Connection 3%
  • Introduction Video 1%

Instructor: David Letwin, dpletwin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:240 Staging Resistance: Theater, Protest, and Social Change Online

Staging Resistance: Theater, Protest, and Social Change Online

Course Number: 07:965:240
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Through plays and other performance texts, videos, graphics, media accounts, and critical theory readings, this class will explore the vibrant tradition of the atricalized or staged resistance to the injustice and inequality endemic to contemporary culture. Sources include: plays and films that explicitly challenge embedded power hierarchies; radical performative disruptions such as Pussy Riot, Occupy Wall Street, and Take a Knee protests; and participatory community-engaged theater for social change.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: This course is based on the principle of “Dual-Purpose Content,” in which the curriculum a) facilitates the acquisition of discipline-specific knowledge, and b) serves to develop critical, analytical, and creative thinking.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the historical development of “staged resistance,” beginning with the first-wave European avant-garde movements of the late nineteenth/early twentieth century, through to the present
  • Identify how class, race, gender, nationality, sexuality — among other identity markers — intersect with “staged resistance.”
  • Analyze the ways in which “staged resistance” overlaps with and breaks from the aesthetics/techniques of traditional theater.

Learning Outcomes

  • Construct coherent, analytical, critical written arguments that synthesize course concepts.
  • Demonstrate close engagement with course readings and comprehension of course concepts and facts.
  • Critically, analytically, and creatively engage with other students via discussions assignments based on course material.
  • Incorporate course concepts into creative final project.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Structure and Assignments
Note: Assignments subject to change

The course is organized around weekly modules/case studies. Over the semester, the student will:

  • One video introduction
  • Eleven weekly open-book quizzes on the readings (lecture plus any additional readings)
  • Two Visual Connection assignments
  • Two discussions assignments
  • One closed-book Final Exam
  • One Blog Assignment

Final Grade Calculation

  • Blog Project 30%
  • Discussion Threads (2 total) 32% (16% each)
  • Final Exam 21%
  • Weekly Quizzes (11 total) 16% (1.45% each)
  • Introduction Video 1%

Instructor: David Letwin, dpletwin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:271 Basic Acting

Basic Acting

Course Number: 07:965:271

This course is designed to provide students a basic understanding of the technique of acting. Students discover the basic approaches to the technique of acting through active participation in exercises, improvisations, and scene work.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

07:965:281 Theater History

Theater History

Course Number: 07:965:281
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Western theatrical traditions from Greek through contemporary avant-garde theater. See 07:965:231-232 for online offering. Students may not receive credit for both 07:965:231-232 and 07:965:281-282.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will explore the historical context in which plays were written and major historical events and players that have significantly contributed to theater.
  • Students will leave the class with a better understanding that theater history must not be looked at as one movement leading to the next, but as a series of movements often occurring simultaneously and in conversation with one another.
  • Students will examine critically aesthetic and theoretical issues concerning theater and performance (SAS Core Curriculum AH.C.o.), as well as analyze theatrical literature in relation to specific histories, values, cultures, and technologies.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:302 Theater For Social Development

Theater For Social Development

Course Number: 07:965:302
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Theater for Social Development is designed to develop students’ understanding of how the arts can be integrated into community development and engaged social interventions.

3 credit(s)

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will read and analyze research from leading thinkers and practitioners in the fields of racial and social justice art, socially engaged art, social practice art, applied theater, and community development.
  • Students will analyze sustainable practices in socially engaged arts and extrapolate sustainable frameworks in the field for the development of fully creative communities.
  • Students will forge connections through on-site, or virtual visits to New Brunswick non-profit agencies that engage with the arts to further their social advocacy work.
  • Students will be able to estimate and evaluate the potential effects of arts-based interventions.
  • Students will synthesize the course theory to conceptualize a socially engaged art project that integrates concepts of community identity, social advocacy, and professional artistic technique.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Reading List

  • Seeing Power: Art and Activism in the Twenty-first Century by Nato Thompson. Publisher: Melville House (December 12, 2014). ISBN-10: 1612190448. ISBN-13: 978-1612190440
  • Applying Performance: Live Art, Socially Engaged Theatre and Affective Practice by N. Shaughnessy. Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2012 edition (July 6, 2012). Publication Date: July 6, 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0230241336. ISBN-10: 0230241336.
  • Education for Socially Engaged Art: A Materials and Techniques Handbook by Pablo Helguera. Publisher: Jorge Pinto Books Inc. (October 5, 2011). ISBN-10: 1934978590. ISBN-13: 978-1934978597.
  • Theatre of the Oppressed by Augusto Boal. Publisher: Theatre Communications Group; Tcg ed. edition (January 1, 1993). ISBN-10: 0930452496. ISBN-13: 978-0930452490.
  • Articles, Online Journals, Podcasts

The following content is available online:

Other works worth knowing about but not required for this class:

  • The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City by Elisabeth Currid-Hacklet (Selections). Publisher: Princeton University Press; New edition with a New preface by the author edition (October 19, 2008). ISBN-10: 0691138745. ISBN-13: 978-0691138749.
  • Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship by Claire Bishop. Publisher: Verso; Original edition (July 24, 2012). ISBN-10: 1844676900. ISBN-13: 978-1844676903.
  • Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics by Shannon Jackson. Publisher: Routledge (April 7, 2011). ISBN-10: 0415486009. ISBN-13: 978-0415486002.
  • Method Meets Arts: Arts-Based Research Practices by Patricia Levy. Publisher: The Guilford Press; Second edition (January 8, 2015). ISBN-10: 9781462513321. ISBN-13: 978-1462513321.
  • Location-Based and Audience-Aware Storytelling: Grace Plains and Bodies for a Global Brain. https://howlround.com/location-based-and-audience-aware-storytelling-grace-plains-and-bodies-for-a-global-brain

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Ars Brevis (1): “Art Brief” – A take on the Latin phrase “Ars Longa, Vita Brevis” (Trs: Art is long, Life is Short). Because life is short, we will attempt to get to the quick on large concepts and ideas. As this course is a cooperative conversation there will be a need for additional information from time to time. Students will be required at least twice during the semester to develop a quick turnaround report on a topic, community, company, form, or concept. The topic will be researched outside of class time and the student will present a 1 page “brief” as well as a 5-minute in class presentation.

Case Study Paper (1): Students will choose a particular event, company, or concept that they wish to take a “deep dive” into. The project will take the form of a case study which will be outlined over the course of the semester but will include the need for detailed descriptions of the key aspects of the subject matter as well as analysis of how the subject matter correlates to the students understanding of key terminology.

Concept Proposal (1): Students will participate in a devised Art for Social Development Project presentation. The presentation will be structured as a “pitch” for potential participants and funders.

Class Participation and Assignments: This class is being taught in a synchronous/asynchronous hybrid model. Course materials will be released on a weekly basis. Students will be expected to complete readings and assignments during the scheduled times.

Class Discussion Boards: Students will be expected to participate in all required CANVAS class conversations. The course is designed to allow time for comments and feedback from all participants.

Readings: Students are expected to complete all assigned readings.

Assessment
Assessment Area – Percentage of Final Grade

  • Class Discussions – 20%
  • Ars Brevis – 20%
  • Mid-Term Case Study – 20%
  • Final Project and Presentation – 30%
  • Reading Responses – 10%

Course Rubric
Below is a sample course rubric. Assessments will be made for each student at the time of the mid-term evaluation and end of semester. However, a rubric may be delivered to a student at any time during the semester at the professor’s discretion.

Assessment Scale

  • Mastery – approaching professional standard
  • Competency – good working knowledge
  • Developing – working towards knowledge
  • Unacceptable – little to no understanding or growth

Area of Assessment

  1. Student is able to comprehend, synthesize, and articulate new knowledge in the field of arts-based community development. Student completes selected readings on time and is able to participate in class discussions.
  2. Student approaches their work creatively and generates design sample ideas for arts-based community development interventions.
  3. Student is able to engage with a professional demeanor with class guests in arts-based community development efforts – including proper attendance and detailed question asking and knowledge sharing.
  4. Student is able to think critically and estimate and evaluate the potential effects of arts-based work and interventions.
  5. Student is able to work cooperatively within a team project design model.

Instructor: John Keller, jpkeller@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:310 Intro to Costume Design

Intro to Costume Design

Course Number: 07:965:310
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to Costume Design is a lecture course that covers the fundamentals of costume design; character analysis, basic research techniques, and rendering are covered as they pertain to costume design.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize what costume design is, and the basic principles needed to tell a story.
  • Create a visual approach to costume design through research, analysis, and costume renderings.
  • Create rough sketches and color costume renderings.
  • Present themselves and their work with confidence and clarity.

Instructor: David Murin, dmurin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:326 Performance Workshop

Performance Workshop

Course Number: 07:965:326

The study of rehearsal techniques and performance practice. Attendance is required.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:965:325 and an audition is required.

07:965:350 Improv & Theater Games

Improv & Theater Games

Course Number: 07:965:350

This course is designed to provide the student with the skills to utilize the basic improvisational theater games and exercises for the student who has some experience in acting.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:965:271

07:965:359 Independent Study

Independent Study

Course Number: 07:965:359

This course allows students to work and study on a project independently which provides the opportunity to develop and refine their theater skills with one-on-one support and direction from professional faculty.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to upper-class theater arts majors with permission of instructor and student’s theater arts adviser.

07:965:364 Theater Management

Theater Management

Course Number: 07:965:364

This course is designed to develop the student’s understanding of the fundamental concepts and practices of today’s Theater Manager, which includes several management aspects of professional regional theater, such as: organizational design, administration, marketing, budgeting, and fundraising.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to 965/966 majors or by permission of instructor.

07:965:370 Global Theater

Global Theater

Course Number: 07:965:370
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Global Theater explores the theories and practices — the ideas behind the art — of theater and theatrical performance in the 21st century, with an emphasis on historical perspectives and contemporary applications. Through questioning the nature and function of the art form and interdisciplinary comparisons, the students are encouraged to examine their own values and beliefs and how those values and beliefs might shape the future.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Theater History 1 & 2

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will read and discuss works by playwrights, philosophers and aesthetic theorists from diverse cultures and epochs.
  • Students will analyze how different societies and perspectives shape the theatrical form and the experience of it.
  • Students will examine critically aesthetic and theoretical issues concerning theater and performance (SAS Core Curriculum AH.C.o.), as well as analyze theatrical literature in relation to specific histories, values, cultures and technologies.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:390 Theater Horizons

Theater Horizons

Course Number: 07:965:390

This course is designed to provide students valuable information regarding careers in professional theater as well as career preparation–guest speakers and site visits included. Required of all junior theater arts 965 majors.

3 credit(s)

07:965:396 Internships/Theater

Internships/Theater

Course Number: 07:965:396

Supervised work experience in a department of a professional theater organization. Includes design and production, performance, stage management, business management, or literary management.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

07:965:421 Directing

Directing

Course Number: 07:965:421

Principles of play directing, including visual storytelling techniques, communication with actors, and staging fundamentals.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:965:271 and 07:966:215. Open to juniors and seniors only.

07:965:471 Creative Drama For Children

Creative Drama For Children

Course Number: 07:965:471

This course is designed to provide the student with the skills to utilize the creative process to positively impact the child’s imagination within a school environment.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:965:271

07:965:473 Clothing & Culture I

Clothing & Culture I

Course Number: 07:965:473
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course introduces the human phenomenon of dress and adornment, with themes from the fields of psychology, anthropology, art, textile, fashion, and cultural history. Diverse examples of global dress from prehistory to the late 20th century provide rich comparison. Enhancing the curriculum of students preparing for careers in the arts, the class examines the role of fashion in the cultural construction of identity.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course:

  1. Students will be able to analyze dress practices using a framework of basic principles.
  2. Students will be able to identify key garments from the periods and countries covered and explain how they reflect their eras.
  3. Students will be able to recognize themes as they recur throughout the history of fashion.
  4. Students will be able to analyze both modern and historical dress using multidisciplinary tools.
  5. Students will hone their scholarly research and presentation skills.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Recommended:

  • Cole, Daniel J. and Nancy Diehl, The History of Modern Fashion from 1850. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2015.
  • Steele, Valerie. Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. New York: Scribner/Thomson, 2005.
  • Laver, James. Costume and Fashion: A Concise History. New York: Thames & Hudson, 1969.
  • Welters, Linda, and Abby Lillethun. Fashion History: A Global View. London: Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2018.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Assessment:

  • Weekly Assignments: (20%)
    • A short assignment will be due on the Canvas course shell before class almost every week. (See Course Schedule for details.) For Discussion posts, after submitting their work, students are required to read and comment on at least three other classmates’ submissions. These assignments will assess learning outcome goals 1-4.
  • Midterm Exam: (15%)
    • A midterm exam will be given on the material covered up to that point. The Midterm assesses how well the student is meeting learning outcome goals 1-4 and which areas may need more work.
  • Research Project: (30%)
    • Each student will present a research project in class on an individual’s life in fashion. This project gives students a chance to deepen their knowledge of the course material and develop their research and presentation skills. The Research Project assesses learning outcome goals 1-5.
  • Final Exam: (25%)
    • The final exam will cover concepts from the entire semester with an emphasis on the material after the midterm and include selected terms from students’ final research projects. Several essay questions will be assigned ahead. The final exam will be scheduled by the department and held online, assessing learning outcome goals 1-4.
  • Class Participation/Attendance: (10%)
    • Wholehearted participation in class is expected, with openness to the diverse experiences of the group. Participation also includes willingness to read period texts out loud, share personal experiences of fashion, and occasionally volunteer to model period clothing.

Instructor: Elizabeth Clancy, elizabeth.clancy@rutgers.edu

07:965:490 Advanced Light Lab

Advanced Light Lab

Course Number: 07:965:490

A weekly discussion and exploration of the properties of light, and how to manipulate the medium to support storytelling, affect perception and inform overall point of view.

2 credit(s)

07:965:491 Project Work

Project Work

Course Number: 07:965:491

Application of performance, production, or critical theory under professional supervision in an outside theatrical organization. Activities include, but are not limited to, literary management, directing, stage management, design, and theater management. In certain limited instances an acting project can be proposed.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:215 and permission of student’s B.A. adviser. Open to juniors and seniors.

07:965:493 Honors Project Theater Arts

Honors Project Theater Arts

Course Number: 07:965:493

Students with 3.0 within the major are eligible to select performance, production, or critical theory under faculty supervision. Honors Committee comprised of 3 university professors evaluate the student’s project. Students need to possess the ability to work independently.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of B.A. adviser. Student must have at least 3.0 within the major.

07:965:497 Workshop Topics Theater: Scene Study

Workshop Topics Theater: Scene Study

Course Number: 07:965:497
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Actors will discover how to imaginatively apply all the techniques they have acquired for working from their own truth to the actual process of rehearsing and then performing a play. The goal is to develop and reinforce a creative, collaborative and free way of working that enables the actor to build and sustain a multi-dimensional, spontaneous performance that springs from the unique demands and circumstances of the play.

By using scene study to work through a model of the process actors will come to see rehearsal as an adventurous exploration they need to actively manage with discipline and preparation. They will address how they must work to carefully construct an imaginary world, from the specific circumstances of the play, that will sustain them and move them to action, giving them the freedom to be fully alive in performance. The ultimate quality of that performance depends on the breadth and depth of that collaborative process. From the moment of first encountering the script through the last performance of the play the fulfilled actor is always living in discovery.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Required for 1st & 2nd Year BFA Acting Students
Learning Goals of Course:

  • For actors to understand and discover how to imaginatively apply all the techniques they have acquired from the Meisner exercise work to the actual process of rehearsing and then performing a play, thereby bringing their own unique truth to the world of the play.
  • Learn how to approach and work with the script from the first reading of the play, through the rehearsal process and into performance.
  • Learn how to analyze the script for the given circumstances and learn that the given circumstances are the bedrock on which your imagination builds your creative choices. They are the source of your inspiration.
  • Learn the building blocks that will lead them to action: Superobjective or Life Drives, Objectives, Obstacles and Actions or Intentions.
  • Acquire the necessary curiosity to explore relationships and discover the character through a deeper examination and understanding of the script and the world of the play.

Instructor: William Carden, wcarden@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:103 Theater Homeroom

Theater Homeroom

Course Number: 07:966:103

Theater Homeroom is a multidisciplinary, weekly event that includes: sharing of ideas, information, and inspirations; professional and academic panels and workshops; guest artists; discussions and performances. Attendance is mandatory and the course is taken for pass/fail credit.

0 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA students only.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:105 Drawing Practice

Drawing Practice

Course Number: 07:966:105
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course is an exploration into illustration/drawing techniques for both costume and scenic design. Costume students will receive in-depth, solid instruction in figure drawing and rendering, that allow students to develop their individual style for creating costume sketches. Scenic, Lighting and Production students will learn to “see” better, by the use of simple exercises that employ the conditions of visual reality transferred to the flat surface by flat planes and straight lines. Model fee associated with course.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA design majors or by permission of instructor
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, Costume students should be able to:

  • Create rough pencil sketches and colour costume renderings.
  • Show increased skills in various media including: collage, pencil, marker, watercolor, gouache paints, etc.
  • Learn industry standard illustration and rendering techniques for costume designers.
  • Present themselves and their work with confidence, clarity and professionalism.

Scenic, Lighting and Production students should be able to:

  • Make a drawing on paper translated from the immediate environment, art of the historical past, or from photographs.
  • Use a variety of art materials for form, character, scale and dimensions.
    Have familiarity with the sources of cultural arcifacts in our surroundings and in our craft.

Instructor: Jerilyn Jurinek, jurinek@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Shane Ballard, sb1596@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:123 Theater Practice

Theater Practice

Course Number: 07:966:123
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Sections include assignments in one of the production shops: set, lighting, and costume or a run crew assignment on one show. Attending one MGSA strike is mandatory in the semester. A minimum of 90 hours is required to pass the course, but some production running assignments may require up to 150 hours.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Learn the basic skills associated with a specific production shop
  • Learn how to take part in a show strike

Instructor: Jennifer Stauffer, jstauffer@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:124 Theater Practice: Design/Acting

Theater Practice: Design/Acting

Course Number: 07:966:124
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course allows the students to experience different areas of the Production experience including the production shops, backstage crew, or understudying on one show. This is a lab course that must be taking twice consecutively covering one full academic year. For BFA Design & Production Majors, over the course of the year they will be assigned 1 run crew assignment and spend 7 weeks in each of the 3 production shops: Scene Shop, Costume Shop, & Light Shop. For the BFA Actors, over the course of the year, they will be assigned to work crew on one show and understudy on one show. Two semesters are required for all BFA majors.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Depending on your major and/or assignment you will:

  • Learn the differences between each production shop.
  • Learn how to be a member of a show crew.
  • Learn how to take part in a show strike in a safe environment.
  • Learn the goals of how to be a successful understudy on a production.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: None
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Your grade for the Theater Practice class will be based on your attendance and the quality of your work. During technical rehearsal weekends you should plan to make yourself available to help get the production up. If a work call is scheduled on tech weekend, it is required. These additional work calls are in addition to your normally scheduled shop time.

Instructor: Jennifer Stauffer, jstauffer@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:202 Stage Management Forum

Stage Management Forum

Course Number: 07:966:202
Course Format: Seminar

This class is set up as a series of full Stage Management Area seminars designed to give students an opportunity to unpack their thoughts about stage management as well as discuss topical stage management-related readings and theater industry news. Most discussion topics are not determined in advance of the semester’s onset, in an effort to hold space for topics to arise.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA stage managers
Learning Goals of Course: Students actively participating in this course will build on their abilities to reflect regularly on their individual relationships with the craft of stage management, as well as the application of the stage management skillset in professional practice and other arenas.

By meeting deadlines and engaging with the topics presented for discussion, students will build on their skillsets in the following areas:

  • Time management
  • Organization
  • Communication (written & verbal)
  • Analysis

All learning opportunities are stage management learning opportunities.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Varies by semester

Instructor: Anne McPherson, amcpherson@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:215 Intro to Design

Intro to Design

Course Number: 07:966:215
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introductory course in basic theatrical design and production, as well as an exploration of both the elements and principles of design and promotion of conceptual and divergent thinking. Lectures cover a wide range of topics relating to the technical and aesthetic aspects of designing scenery, costumes, and lighting for the stage; lab periods will be utilized to learn technical skills and to put the information covered in the lectures into practice, using both fine art, and theatrical techniques.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA Design & Production majors or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course students should be able to:

  • Show a thorough knowledge of basic theatrical technical and design concepts and terminology.
  • Show familiarity with job titles and responsibilities within the theatrical profession.
  • Show knowledge of historical performance spaces and physical presentation styles and techniques.
  • Show knowledge of basic stagecraft concepts in scenery, lighting, and costumes.
  • Employ and understand basic design theory and process as well as materials, generated by designers in all areas, necessary to transfer ideas from concept to reality.
  • Develop creative work from a variety of viewpoints using various mediums.
  • Implement creative solutions and problem-solving techniques in order to make informed design choices.
  • Present themselves and their ideas in both visually compelling and verbally articulate manner.

Instructor: David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:219 Introduction to Scenic Construction

Introduction to Scenic Construction

Course Number: 07:966:219
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students will be taught techniques and terminology that will prepare them for working in a scene shop; construction of scenic elements will be covered. Working with power tools and learning the basics of theatrical scenery construction while working safely and in a timely fashion.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Only open to BFA students or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

At the completion of this course, the student will have:

  • Learned the use and application for tools used in scenic construction
  • Learned about basic scenic construction
  • Learned basic shop math
  • Learned about collaboration in a shop setting
  • Learned about shop safety

Required and Recommended Course Materials: All course material is supplied.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Projects: There will be three construction projects throughout the semester.
  • Quizzes: There will be two quizzes throughout the semester. These will be based on lectures to make sure you are on top off all the technical terms used in class.
  • Final Project: You will work in small groups to solve a Problem Set that will be assigned to you. It will be reviewed on the last day of classes.

Instructor: Jennifer Stauffer, jstauffer@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:225 Voice & Speech I

Voice & Speech I

Course Number: 07:966:225
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introducing the practices of developing one’s vocal mechanism and speech skills to apply to acting and performance.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA acting students.

Learning Goals of Course: This fundamental technique course is intended to develop the actor’s breath, tone, range of voice and articulation of the body by finding release and awareness. Through an integrated approach of voice and movement, the student begins to develop balance of body, voice, intention and thought. The class includes those of Clifford Turner, Lessac, Linklater and Fitzmaurice Destructur-ing Technique. The body work during the first semester draws from various techniques including Bartenieff Fundamentals, Laban Movement, Skinner Releasing , Feldenkrais Method, and Yoga.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:230 Movement I

Movement I

Course Number: 07:966:230
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Basic development of the body for the stage.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA acting students.

Learning Goals of Course: Students will begin to experience and practice exercises designed to release the constrictions of the actor’s instrument and to free the actor’s emotional life. The beginning of the core of The Williamson Technique.

Instructor: Danielle Liccardo-Massood, liccardo@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:231 Movement I

Movement I

Course Number: 07:966:231
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Basic development of the body for the stage.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:966:230
Course Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The goals of the first year of the movement work:

Upon completion of this course the actor will have a full understanding of how to identify pedestrian and socialized behavior in the body.
Upon completion of this course the actor will be able to:

  • embody a more authentic and unbridled physical and emotional expression
  • bring about a more receptive physical intelligence in the body

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: See student handbook

Instructor: Liccardo-Massood, Danielle; liccardo@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:232 History of Costume & Décor I

History of Costume & Décor I

Course Number: 07:966:232
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is part one of a two-part introductory research course on the major cultural ideas, events, and styles from antiquity through the 21st century–how ideas travel through history being adopted, adapted, then accessed and acknowledged by theatrical artists is the foundation of our work in this course. We engage in multidimensional exploration of both material and nonmaterial culture, as well as an appreciation of aesthetics from both around the globe and throughout history will be introduced. Lectures and lab work will utilize a range of research methods. Student researchers will begin to develop a not only a foundational knowledge of global architecture, dress, and objects, they will learn to thoughtfully, question and synthesize the ideas and concepts used to create identity, narrative, and culture, while applying these findings within their own theatrical disciplines.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA design and production students or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Conduct culturally responsible research using a variety of research
    methods including online, library, and ethnographic research.
  • Identify and research the material specificity of time period, geographic location, cultural identity, and occasion.
  • Synthesize ideas that cross cultures, time and resonate with contemporary society and their own lived experiences.
  • Present research findings both verbally and visually with confidence and clarity, justify choices of sources, medium, and historical or cultural accuracy of ideas while connecting into a complex whole in their own design work.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Required Texts/Course Materials

  • Hal Tine, Essentials of Period Style: A source book for stage and production designers, Routledge; 1st edition 2015
  • Online articles and videos as assigned by the professor

Non-digital Materials Required:

  • Lined notebook and writing tools
  • Laptop or Tablet- Ability to create Slide Decks on software like PowerPoint or Google Slides.
  • Working Camera (Phone is fine)

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grades will be based on the student’s accumulated grades received on discussion, in class activities, assignments, and responses, and final project—as well as the student’s class participation and attendance.

Attendance at all classes is expected of all students, and all class sessions are conducted with this understanding. In our conservatory unexcused absences are not allowed. Although an occasional absence may be unavoidable, it in no way excuses a student from meeting the requirements of the course. But each unexcused absence will reduce your attendance grade by an entire letter. Only legitimate absences will be excused: illness, family or personal emergencies, or religious observances. The student is responsible for the material covered and the assignments given on the day of their absence.

Assignments are due at the beginning of the class in which it has been stated as the due date. Work submitted after the assigned due date/class period is considered late. Late projects will be deducted as follows:

  • 10% off for up to 3 days late.
  • 20% off 4-7 days late.
  • 30% off for 8-14 days.

Any projects more than 14 days late will not be accepted.

Instructor: Valerie Ramshur, vramshur@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:242 Intro to Stage Lighting

Intro to Stage Lighting

Course Number: 07:966:242
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

A seminar/lab course discussing and applying stage lighting practices. The course is focused on the technologies used in entertainment lighting design. Topics include: theatrical lighting fixtures, optics, photometrics, color theory, programming computer light boards, practical lighting skills, script analysis, research, and theoretical design.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA theater majors or by permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course: Students will learn to observe and analyze light as rendered in the visual arts and in the real world and will develop a heightened awareness of light as it relates to their individual disciplines.

Students will understand the properties and objectives of light and will learn the basic building blocks of creating a lighting design: fixtures, optics, color, and photometrics.

Students will learn how to interpret the documentation involved in lighting design and how to execute the design onstage, including programming a computer light board.

Students will acquire sufficient knowledge of lighting process and technique to create a simple lighting design for a play.

Instructor: Cat Tate Starmer, cat.tate.starmer@rutgers.edu

07:966:245 History of Architecture & Decorative Arts

History of Architecture & Decorative Arts

Course Number: 07:966:245
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is an introductory course on basic period styles. Weekly lectures introduce vocabulary and main points of identification, along with field trips to the Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Frick Collection, and other museums where students do sketch assignments covering appropriate historical periods. Students are responsible for all public transportation and entrance fees.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:215 & 07:966:216. Open only to BFA design majors or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand the history and evolution of architectural periods and styles, from ancient Egypt through late 18th-century Europe.
  • Have knowledge of important and influential trends, and architects/designers from ancient to early modern history.
  • Identify period styles in architecture, furniture, and decorative objects on sight.
  • Use correct terminology to refer to architectural and decorative objects.
  • Translate period architectural and decorative objects into hand drawings.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Required Text: The Annotated Arch: A Crash Course on the History of Architecture by Carol Strickland
  • 9″x12″ sketchbook
  • Drawing pencils

Instructor: David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:246 History of Architecture & Decorative Arts

History of Architecture & Decorative Arts

Course Number: 07:966:246
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is the second semester of an introductory course on basic period styles. Weekly lectures introduce vocabulary and main points of identification, along with field trips to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim, MOMA, and other museums where students do sketch assignments covering appropriate historical periods. Students are responsible for all public transportation and entrance fees.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:245. Open only to BFA design majors or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand the history and evolution of architectural periods and styles in Europe, America, and elsewhere from the 18th century to the present day.
  • Have knowledge of important and influential trends and architects/designers from the colonial to current eras.
  • Identify period styles in architecture, furniture, and decorative objects on sight.
  • Use correct terminology to refer to architectural and decorative objects.
  • Translate period architectural and decorative objects into hand drawings.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Required Texts:
    • The Annotated Arch: A Crash Course on the History of Architecture by Carol Strickland
    • The Visual Dictionary of American Domestic Architecture by Rachel Carley
  • 9″x12″ sketchbook
  • Drawing pencils

Instructor: David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:249 Introduction to Stage Management

Introduction to Stage Management

Course Number: 07:966:249
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course is designed to introduce students to core stage management concepts.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to all BFA and BA Theater majors as availability allows. Priority given to Stage Management majors.
Learning Goals of Course:

By taking this course, students will be able to answer fundamental questions about stage management:

  • What is stage management?
    What are the basic tasks as commonly divided and shared within a stage management team?
    What skills does stage management require?
    How do stage managers balance tangible and literal (“hard”) skills with the intuitive and interpersonal leadership (“soft”) skills?
    Why is context important when applying these skills?
    Why are specificity and detail important when applying these skills?

Instructor: Anne McPherson, amcpherson@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:251 Fundamentals of Drafting

Fundamentals of Drafting

Course Number: 07:966:251

Fundamental skills in technical drawing and stagecraft techniques.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:215-216. Open only to B.F.A. design and production majors or by permission of instructor.

07:966:271 Acting I

Acting I

Course Number: 07:966:271
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Theory and practice in the art of acting.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA acting students.

Learning Goals of Course: Throughout the year, our work will take you through a series of exercises designed to root you in the fundamental principles of acting and aid in your development as a truthful acting instrument. These exercises allow you to expand your self-knowledge, investigate your areas of sensitivity, and strengthen your imagination. You will achieve this through utilizing a set of tools designed to help you build a solid foundation of skills that you can later apply to a piece of text.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:272 Acting I

Acting I

Course Number: 07:966:272
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The first year is the student’s introduction to an immersive conservatory environment. Students will have the opportunity to explore their inner emotional life and develop a personal point of view, as well as a solid technique through which to express that point of view. This structure allows the student to become intimately acquainted with their own instrument and how they process and experience things in the imaginary world. All of the first year work is about the actor as a unique individual, working as themselves under imaginary circumstances.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:966:271
Course Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The work takes students through a series of exercises designed to root them in the fundamental principles of acting and aid in their development as a truthful acting instrument. These exercises allow them to expand their self-knowledge, investigate their areas of sensitivity, and strengthen their imaginations. This will be achieved through utilizing a set of tools designed to help build a solid foundation of skills that can later be applied to a piece of text.

Instructor: Jackel, Deb; dje2@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:274 Costume Construction

Costume Construction

Course Number: 07:966:274
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is an introductory course where you will learn fundamental sewing skills that are used in constructing costumes for theater. The course begins with learning both hand sewing and machine sewing techniques. Once you have completed a sample binder displaying these skills you will construct a ballet bodice utilizing the techniques covered earlier and further expand on your costume construction skills to include cutting, uses of flatlining, boning and more advanced sewing techniques.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA design and production majors or by permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will learn hand sewing techniques used in the construction of costumes.
  • Students will learn how to thread a domestic sewing machine, and learn machine sewing techniques and finishes utilized in constructing costumes
  • Students will learn how to use the various tools used in a typical costume shop
  • Students will use these skills to construct a ballet bodice from a theatrical pattern and expand on their knowledge to include cutting, flatlining and boning techniques and more advanced sewing techniques.
  • Students will assemble and organize a binder container all of the sewing samples covered in class

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Fabric and notions for various projects. A sewing kit is including but limited to scissors and a grid, ruler, and pencils.

Instructor: Denise Wagner, dwagner@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:277 Production Properties

Production Properties

Course Number: 07:966:277
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course is an introduction to the world of stage properties. The class will cover responsibilities, paper work, research, programs, and additional duties typically preformed by a prop master, as well as focusing on creating props by using different materials commonly found in prop shops.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA design and production majors or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively with designers, directors, stage managers and other members of the production team regarding props and how they will be used and need to look.
  • Build simple props given a limited amount of materials available to them. Materials will be those that are commonly found in prop shops.
  • Create paper work required of prop mangers (budgets, prop list, research and basic drafting of props.
  • Show the integration of technologies and properties, how and when to use them and be able to use them.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Exacto knife and blades
  • Cutting Mat
  • Paint Brushes
  • Craft supplies based on chosen prop project
  • Preferred way of taking notes
  • Binder

Instructor: Shannon White, smw248@rutgers.edu

07:966:305 Advanced Stage Lighting Tech

Advanced Stage Lighting Tech

Course Number: 07:966:305

Technical and mechanical aspects of stage lighting including electrical theory, practical wiring, equipment maintenance, and safety practice. Applications to stage, film, and touring situations.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:242 and permission of instructor

07:966:309 Costume Design I

Costume Design I

Course Number: 07:966:309
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Costume Design I is the first step in developing an understanding and appreciation for art of costume design. Through a series of weekly projects, exercises and discussions students begin to understand and employ the concepts and vocabulary of the basic design elements and principles and how it applies to character driven theatrical design. Studying groundbreaking theatrical costume designers, both historical and contemporary, students will begin to understand their place in the costume continuum while embarking on a journey toward developing their own unique and individual style of creating costume sketches and renderings. Student work will be presented each week for constructive feedback from the professor and fellow classmates.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA design and production majors or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Employ basic design vocabulary and understanding of design elements and principles in relation to costume design.
  • Observe and create nuanced character driven renderings with Increased confidence and skills using several mediums.
  • Acquire and interpret primary research by using a variety of research tools and methodologies in order to develop ideas.
  • Present research findings both verbally and visually with confidence and clarity, justify choices of sources, medium, and historical or cultural accuracy of ideas while connecting into a complex whole in their own design work.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Technology Requirements:

  • Laptop or Tablet
  • Ability to create Slide Decks on a program similar to PowerPoint or Google Slides.
  • Working Camera (Phone is fine)

Non Digital Materials:

  • Blank Sketchbook at least 8×10 OR a digital file alternative
  • Three Ring Binder for collecting images OR a digital file alternative.
  • Items for writing and coloring and Basic art supplies and materials for renderings as needed.
  • Lined notebook and writing tools.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grades will be based on the student’s accumulated grades received on the following: discussions, in class activities, assignments, and responses, and final project—as well as the student’s class participation and attendance.

Attendance at all classes is expected of all students, and all class sessions are conducted with this understanding. In our conservatory unexcused absences are not allowed. Although an occasional absence may be unavoidable, it in no way excuses a student from meeting the requirements of the course. But each unexcused absence will reduce your attendance grade by an entire letter. Only legitimate absences will be excused: illness, family or personal emergencies, or religious observances.

The student is responsible for the material covered and the assignments given on the day of their absence.

Assignments are due at the beginning of the class in which it has been stated as the due date. Work submitted after the assigned due date/class period is considered late. Late projects will be deducted as follows:

  • 10% off for up to 3 days late.
  • 20% off 4-7 days late.
  • 30% off for 8-14 days.
  • Any projects more than 14 days late will not be accepted.

Instructor: Valerie Ramshur, vramshur@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:313 Set Design I

Set Design I

Course Number: 07:966:313

Advanced work in scene design with an emphasis on individual style development.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:243-244. Open only to B.F.A. design majors or by permission of instructor.

07:966:315 Principles of Stage Management

Principles of Stage Management

Course Number: 07:966:315
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The course is designed to build on the foundation of stage management essentials through a process of elaboration and expansion, continuing to explore the evergreen question: how do stage management building blocks function in practice in the field, at each stage of production?

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:249-250. Open only to BFA stage management students or by permission of instructor.
Learning Goals of Course: By taking this course, students will grow more versed in nuance, situation-specific engagement, and deployment of skills. Students will grow their understanding of team dynamics as well as relationship building with other members of the production team. Students will continue to develop their leadership skills. Students will continue to develop their knowledge of the “how you.”

Instructor: Anne McPherson, amcpherson@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:319 Speech II

Speech II

Course Number: 07:966:319
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Advanced speech and diction for the theater and performance.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:225-226. Open to BFA II actors only.

Learning Goals of Course:

Students will begin the process of:

  • Addressing past practices of using speech training as language discrimination
  • Bounding the current class as a space for exploration
  • Investigating the precepts of speech training in light of past wrongs
  • Agreement to acknowledge, share, investigate, and interrogate language preferences and biases.
  • Basic definitions of speech, accent, and dialect — and discussion of competing definitions

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:323 Theater Practice

Theater Practice

Course Number: 07:966:323
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is a BFA 2 lab course that expands the students experience in their concentration as a vital part of the construction crew in either the Scene, Costume or Electrics Shops.

Scenic Designer and Technical Directors: This is a lab class that takes place in the Scene Shop and involves building scenery, painting, etc. Appropriate attire is required for working conditions.

Lighting Designers: This is a lab class that takes place in the Electrics Shop, where you will be cabling, circuiting, maintaining, hanging and focusing lighting instruments.

Costume Designers and Costume Technicians: This is a lab class that takes place in the Costume Shop where you will learn basic sewing and costume-related skills that are useful in theater. Skills covered will include hand stitches and their most common applications, machine sewing, maintaining a show, and working in a shop environment. You will also assist with various support tasks around the shop (e.g. alterations and restocking), make a purse or tote bag utilizing your new skills, and possibly construct basic costume pieces for stock.

BA credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:966:124. Not open to first-year students.
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Learning how to run your shop, assigning and overseeing individual projects.
  • Creation of work to develop your professional portfolio.
  • Learning how to network.
  • Learning the dynamic of the interaction between the various shops, seeing complex problem solving.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: This class requires weekly hours in the shop of your focus, as well as work calls during tech weekend and all strikes. You will be given assignments that coincide with the current departmental productions. Your grade for the Theater Practice class will be based on your attendance and the quality of your work.

Instructor: Jennifer Stauffer, jstauffer@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:325 Acting II: Technique

Acting II: Technique

Course Number: 07:966:325
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Scene study and the basis of characterization.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA II actors.

Learning Goals of Course:

To Discover and Explore: The various styles and approaches to acting as it applies to performance. Reinforcing the training from the first year in the program. Consistent habits for breaking down and studying a script. To become conversant about the profession.

To Apply: Technique and discoveries to scripted texts.

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize how word choice and rhetorical forms give the actor a road map for approaching many different types of material
  • Use imagery in a way that is active
  • Continue the development of a rehearsal process that is prescriptive, active, and able to be articulated.
  • Develop of process of working that is consistent with the industry/professional expectations
  • Explore and create character from the outside/in
  • Creating work that is knowledgeable and consistent with the world of the production

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:327 Voice II

Voice II

Course Number: 07:966:327
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Use of the voice in acting.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA II actors.

Learning Goals of Course: The goal of this semester is for the actor to explore their own instrument. All levels of voice production are covered through daily warmups and rehearsals for a new play. The student will learn to lead the warmup for the company. We will work with monologues and scenes where the actor will explore their body, sound and effect in the space. We will also explore physical risk in order to expand vocal and physical range and its relationship to emotional vulnerability. The vocal and physical vigor of the course will stretch limitations and deepen our connection with our body, voice and presence in the space. The semester draws from other techniques such as Fitzmaurice, Lecoq, Lessac, Clown, Linklater, Bartenieff, and Skinner.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:333 Movement II

Movement II

Course Number: 07:966:333
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Emphasis on stage challenges such as period movement; use of objects; awareness of space, energy, and time. Use of the body to develop characterization.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA II actors.

Learning Goals of Course: The arc of the movement curriculum has been designed to release the constrictions of the actor’s instrument and to free the actor’s emotional life. The core technique that was explored in the first year of the training was the The Williamson Technique, coupled with ensemble focused exploration, collaboration and composition. The advanced exploration of this work will be articulated in the fall and spring semesters of the second year.

Instructor: Danielle Liccardo-Massood, liccardo@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:334 Movement II

Movement II

Course Number: 07:966:334
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The physical process of acting, the expansive, transformative instrument, and its role in performance. Emphasis on stage challenges such as period movement, awareness of space, energy, and time. Use of the body to develop characterization.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:966:230-231
Learning Goals of Course: The goals of the second year of the movement training:
Upon completion of this course the actor will be able to:

  • shape their physical expression; and their vocal and deep emotional life into something concrete and specific,
  • build a clear physical intelligence in the acting instrument,
  • apply all acquired skills and concepts to all of the acting work in order to create sustainable, consistent character choices,
  • inhabit their physical instrument in the arena of alignment, openness, and full physical expression.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: See student handbook

Instructor: Liccardo-Massood, Danielle; liccardo@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:339 Technical Direction I

Technical Direction I

Course Number: 07:966:339
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Principles and practice of Technical Direction and the role of the Technical Director within the context of a collaborative process.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:220
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will have:

  • Learned about intermediate stage carpentry
  • Learned about basic stage electronics
  • Learned about basic stage rigging
  • Learned about basic technical drafting

Instructor: Jennifer Stauffer, jstauffer@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:343 Fundamentals of Lighting Design

Fundamentals of Lighting Design

Course Number: 07:966:343

Basic theory and practice of lighting design including script analysis, physics of light and color, and light plots.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:242. Open only to B.F.A. design and production majors or permission of instructor.

07:966:358 Portfolio Prep I

Portfolio Prep I

Course Number: 07:966:358
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course prepares the BFA design student to present themselves and their design work in the professional portfolio formats required by the industry. Team-taught by members of the design faculty, the student is guided in resume preparation, cover letter writing, business cards and digital portfolio creation. In this course students will either start a new portfolio or update a current portfolio. This will include completing an online website portfolio and a digital portfolio.

1 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA design majors.
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Create a digital portfolio that can be shared via cloud or email.
  • Present their portfolio in professional settings. (Part 2)
  • Create a current resume or CV that is geared toward specific job prospects.
  • Write a professional cover letter.
  • Create and order professional business cards.
  • Create a website to showcase projects. (Part 2)

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Working laptop and Wifi access. Additional examples and handouts will be provided in class.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Attendance Policy

Attendance is a very important part of the class. Absence from any class is problematic. In the event that an absence is unavoidable, it is the student’s responsibility to discuss the absence with the instructor to determine whether the absence is excused. One unexcused absence from class can lower the student’s final grade; two unexcused absences may result in failure. Three late arrivals are equal to one unexcused absence. Students are responsible for making up any missed work and being properly prepared for the next class.

Grading

Your grade will be based on the following criteria:

  • 10% Attendance & Participation
  • 25% Business Card
  • 30% Digital Portfolio
  • 25% Cover Letter and Resume
  • 10% Portfolio Presentation

Specific requirements for each project will be discussed when assigned.

Work submitted after the assigned due date/class period are considered late. Late projects will be deducted 10% for each week past due.

Instructor: Valerie Ramshur, vramshur@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Lee Savage, lee.savage@rutgers.edu

07:966:359 Directed Study

Directed Study

Course Number: 07:966:359

Special advanced projects undertaken with a faculty member who agrees to supervise the student’s work.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to B.F.A. majors with permission of instructor and theater arts adviser.

07:966:361 Sound Tech for Theater

Sound Tech for Theater

Course Number: 07:966:361
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Basic theory and practice for use of sound in the theater.

Fees: cost of media.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:215-216 or permission of instructor
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students should be able to understand the role of a sound designer in theatre and create a sound design for a production.

Instructor: Karin Graybash, graybash@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:371 Script Analysis

Script Analysis

Course Number: 07:966:371
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The ability to read and analyze a script is essential to the theatre-maker. In this class we explore and apply the fundamental dramaturgical tools needed to move from the page to the stage. The goal of the course includes — distinguishing the architecture of diverse dramatic works; identifying the types and uses of stage directions; recognizing and activating punctuation, silences and pauses; learning to tell the difference between atmosphere and mood; understanding how to discern and express character through textual clues; and determining the most effective research methods required by a variety of texts.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA students or by permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course: In this class we will look at text analysis from the point of view of the theatre-maker’s preparation, auditions, and first rehearsals (from audition to table reads), giving strategies for how to read a play effectively, finding foundations for actions, understanding character in the context of the whole play, as well as methods for addressing the needs of different genres, playwrights, and theatrical texts.

Students read from a variety of works, analyze, and research. Our primary source is the text in whatever form. We look at language, character, place, imagery, music and musicality, sources, allusions, historical connections, and theatricality, as well as issues of editing and translation, etc.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:411 Production Techniques

Production Techniques

Course Number: 07:966:411
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is a required lab course that expands the students experience in their concentration as a vital part of the construction crew in either the Scenic, Costume, or Electrics Shops.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:966:323. Open only to BFA design and production majors.
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Learning how to run your shop, assigning and overseeing individual projects.
  • Creation of work to develop your professional portfolio.
  • Learning how to network.
  • Learning the dynamic of the interaction between the various shops and gaining skills in complex problem solving.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: This class requires weekly hours in the shop of your focus, as well as work calls during tech weekend and all strikes. The grade will be based on your attendance and the quality of your work.

Instructor: Jennifer Stauffer, jstauffer@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:417 British Arts & Culture

British Arts & Culture

Course Number: 07:966:417
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

British history, art, and architecture studied on site as part of Rutgers’ Conservatory at Shakespeare’s Globe in London to provide historical, social, and religious contexts for Shakespeare’s plays.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA students studying in London.

Learning Goals of Course: The main goal of this course is to provide students with a foundation and understanding of British art and culture which will support their awareness of the historic and current trends in Britain. Further, students will connect this knowledge with art and culture that influenced or is influenced by Shakespeare. This will include:

  • Identifying cultural and artistic influences in Britain.
  • Writing critical analysis of British art, architecture and culture in historical, social and religious context.
  • Understanding the historic significance of British social and artistic trends.
  • Recognizing the influence on and of Shakespeare.
  • Synthesizing the impact on American Theatre and Art.
  • Expanding one’s artistic range and context.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu; Michael Pavelka, michael.pavelka@rutgers.edu

07:966:422 Production & Design Projects

Production & Design Projects

Course Number: 07:966:422
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Realizing production design in the areas of costumes, sets, sound, and lights, as assigned by the faculty.

BA credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA design and production majors.
Learning Goals of Course: Students will learn to collaborate with fellow theater-makers in all areas of production. They will acquire necessary skills in handling the responsibilities inherent in filling leadership roles required for mounting a realized theatrical production that is successful both aesthetically and practically. Additional goals are specific to assignment and area of specialization.

Instructor: David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:424 Stage Management Project

Stage Management Project

Course Number: 07:966:424

Production work assigned by semester in a stage management role. Production work may be on a Theater Department production or outside the Theater Department (e.g. with Dance or Music, as common but not exclusive examples). Production work assigned by the Head of Stage Management is the only production work that will count toward course credit.

BA credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA Stage Management majors.
Learning Goals of Course:As a practical application of the stage management skill set, a production assignment provides an opportunity to grow stronger in the craft. Stage management students should enter into each production assignment with an intention to grow as leaders and collaborative facilitators by:

  • Building on proactivity
  • Building on communication skills
  • Building on leadership skills
  • Accomplishing the physical production work (paperwork, running studio rehearsals and technical rehearsals, as examples) while demonstrating an ability to be prepared, focus on tasks, manage projects, organize and streamline systems, and communicate
  • Working collaboratively, positively, and fully within any team

A successful stage manager will do their part to bring their production safely through the artistic and technical process, which may include studio rehearsals, technical rehearsals, previews, a performance run, and closing.

Instructor: Anne McPherson, amcpherson@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:425 Acting IV

Acting IV

Course Number: 07:966:425
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Advanced acting technique and preparation for the profession.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA acting students.

Learning Goals of Course: You will leave this class with the knowledge and insight needed to apply your artistic training to industry/professional settings. You will sharpen your understanding of what you have to offer as an actor, including your particular strengths, skills, and taste. In addition, you will have experience using this lens to select and prepare material that highlights where you are most likely to “fit.” You will develop the ability to search for material with a specific eye towards demonstrating your personality and “castability,” and that will inspire industry professionals to “lean in” (become excited about getting to know more of you).

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:427 Shakespeare Plays

Shakespeare Plays

Course Number: 07:966:427
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Intensive study at Rutgers’ Conservatory of Shakespeare’s Globe in London of 20 classical Shakespearean plays.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA students studying in London.

Learning Goals of Course: The main goal of this course is to obtain a basic understanding of Shakespeare’s plays both in context of historical time period and practical text analysis. This will include:

  • Understanding texts written and/or published in the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1558-1603).
  • Identifying and understanding verse, rhyming verse and prose in Shakespeare’s plays.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu; David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:430 Performance

Performance

Course Number: 07:966:430
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Student-generated senior performance projects consisting of a variety of public and workshop performances.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA acting majors only.

Learning Goals of Course: Rehearsal and Performance is an extension of the classroom work, giving each student the opportunity to apply that training in a variety of performance projects.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:443 Advanced Stage Management

Advanced Stage Management

Course Number: 07:966:443
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This class explores the stage manager’s process with a focus on the science, art, and skills of stage management. Activities in and outside of the classroom will be utilized in fine-tuning a stage manager’s ability to intuit the varying needs of a project, organize themselves accordingly, create effective and efficient schedules, run a tech, and support the artistic process.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:966:423. Open only to BFA stage managers.

Learning Goals of Course:
After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Seamlessly understand the scope of a getting a production up and running from prep through performance
  • Have a strong understanding of the nuance of teamwork, and the foundations of a leadership style that works for them
  • Understand and practice clear communication in writing and presentation of thoughts and ideas

Instructor: Anne McPherson, amcpherson@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:455 Costume History Seminar

Costume History Seminar

Course Number: 07:966:455
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In-depth study of western period clothing with emphasis on primary research sources. This course explores how costume designers interpret historical research. We will synthesize world events, cultural history, and relationships between dress, identity, economics, social history, and technology. We will use the visual, applied, and performing arts in order to gain insight into the design process and how historical garments been represented in different periods in history.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:247 & 07:966:248. Open only to BFA design students or by permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Interpret relationships between dress and various fields of studies, such as politics, economics, social history, and technology as well as the visual, applied, and performing arts.
  • Locate, identify, and investigate various class structures in history, understanding them particularly as they relate to the design process, storytelling, and the performer.
  • Accurately research and cite historical data by using a variety of research tools such as libraries, special collections, archives, online resources, and museums.
  • Evaluate costumes and clothing styles in various performance mediums and recognize the level of historical accuracy.
  • Identify and define the period with which individual garments, accessories, and historical styles and silhouettes are associated.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Required books, articles, film, live performance, and museum exhibitions. Working laptop with software for creating presentations (Powerpoint, Google Slides, etc.) Additional examples and handouts will be provided in class.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grades will be based on the student’s accumulated grades received on the following: the discussion, in-class activities, research assignments, and responses, projects, as well as the student’s class participation and attendance.

Attendance at all classes is expected of all students, and all class sessions are conducted with this understanding. In our conservatory unexcused absences are not allowed. Although an occasional absence may be unavoidable, it in no way excuses a student from meeting the requirements of the course. But each unexcused absence will reduce your attendance grade by an entire letter. Only legitimate absences will be excused: illness, family or personal emergencies, or religious observances. The student is responsible for the material covered and the assignments given on the day of their absence.

Assignments are due at the beginning of the class in which it has been stated as the due date. Work submitted after the assigned due date/class period is considered late. Late projects will be deducted as follows:

  • 10% off for up to 3 days late.
  • 20% off 4-7 days late.
  • 30% off for 8-14 days.
  • Any projects more than 14 days late will not be accepted.

Instructor: Valerie Ramshur, vramshur@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:460 Scene Design II

Scene Design II

Course Number: 07:966:460
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This is an advanced course in Set Design, in which students will be asked to complete a semester-long project designing a large scale (multi-scene) opera. The course will culminate in the presentation of a finished 1/4” scale model along with drafted master floor plan, scene by scene floor plans, and CL section drawings.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:313-314. Open only to BFA design majors.

Learning Goals of Course: After participating in this course, the student will be able to approach a large-scale design challenge with assurance and with knowledge of the challenges involved in such a project, both aesthetic/conceptual and practical/technical. Presentation materials will be suitable for inclusion in professional design portfolio.

Instructor: David P. Gordon, dgordon@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:462 Costume Design II

Costume Design II

Course Number: 07:966:462
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This advanced course will engage advanced costume students in the process of creating relevant, evocative, and imaginative designs in theatrical costume. Working solely on one text, students will explore how to further develop ideas and images that tell the story of the theatrical text. Becoming more empathetic to our world and history so that we are able to better communicate storytelling is possible when we understand and appreciate relevancy and cultural competency in the context of design. How can we increase our communication skills, both verbal and visual? We will use history, fine art, current events, cultural studies, and literature to inspire our classwork, and explore non-traditional ways of presenting design for the theatre.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:966:335-336

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of this course students should be able to:

  • Assess and analyze a theatrical text to determine the socio-historical context.
  • Synthesize relevant material to understand the text and the context; utilize research to support subsequent design work.
  • Re-imagine and design a traditional theatrical work in alternate contexts.
  • Communicate and articulate both their final design ideas and the process.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Blank Sketchbook at least 8×10 OR a digital file alternative.
  • Three Ring Binder for collecting images OR a digital file alternative.
  • Basic art supplies and items for writing and coloring.
  • Digital rendering is possible if student already familiar with the techniques.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Presentations and assignments are due at the beginning of the class in which they are due. Work submitted after the assigned due date/class period is considered late. Late projects will be deducted as follows:

  • 10% off for up to 3 days late.
  • 20% off 4-7 days late.
  • 30% off for 8-14 days.
  • Any projects more than 14 days late will not be accepted.

Extensions for assignments are typically only granted for family emergencies or illness, and students who miss the opportunity to discuss their work in class because they were absent or unprepared may not be able to make the work up in class time.

Instructor: Valerie Ramshur, vramshur@mgsa.rutgers.edu; David Murin, dmurin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:467 Advanced Stage Management Project

Advanced Stage Management Project

Course Number: 07:966:467
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Production work assigned by semester in a stage management role. Production work may be on a Theater Department production or outside the Theater Department (with Dance or Music, as common but not exclusive examples). Production work assigned by the Head of Stage Management is the only production work that will count toward course credit.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only by permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course:

As a practical application of the stage management skill set, a production assignment provides an opportunity to grow stronger in the craft. Stage management students should enter into each production assignment with an intention to grow as leaders and collaborative facilitators by:

  • Building on proactivity
  • Building on communication skills
  • Building on leadership skills
  • Accomplishing the physical production work (paperwork, running studio rehearsals and technical rehearsals, as examples) while demonstrating an ability to be prepared, focus on tasks, manage projects, organize and streamline systems, and communicate
  • Working collaboratively, positively, and fully within any team

A successful stage manager will do their part to bring their production safely through the artistic and technical process, which may include studio rehearsals, technical rehearsals, previews, a performance run, and closing.

Instructor: Anne McPherson, amcpherson@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:966:476 Video/Auditioning

Video/Auditioning

Course Number: 07:966:476
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

On-camera acting and auditioning techniques.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA IV acting majors only.

Learning Goals of Course:

After participating in this course, the student will have acquired:

  1. A knowledge and understanding of the acting and technical requirements of camera acting.
  2. The ability to work truthfully and spontaneously from yourself, using all or any aspects of your identity and your unique personality in a focused, relaxed way in front of the camera.
  3. A working knowledge of the business considerations and professional best practices required to successfully work in the film and television industry.
  4. The skills to successfully audition via self-tape.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:480 Career Transition/Audition

Career Transition/Audition

Course Number: 07:966:480
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Preparation for graduating actors on the business of the business.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA acting students.

Learning Goals of Course: The objective of the course is to prepare students for the transition from theater as a course of study to that of a profession and to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to be competitive in the industry.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:490 Acting In London

Acting In London

Course Number: 07:966:490

Classical acting and voice training, British culture, and literature in a residence at Rutgers’ Conservatory at Shakespeare’s Globe in London program.

12 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA acting students.

Learning Goals of Course:

The main goal of this course is to obtain an initial foundation in classical acting. This will include:

  • Understanding performance techniques needed to work with classical and Shakespearean plays in the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods:
  • Developing skills in verse speaking
  • learning classical physical storytelling and expression techniques
  • Connecting the Meisner training to heightened text.

Instructor: Cameron Knight, cameron.knight@rutgers.edu

07:966:492 Theater Design in London

Theater Design in London

Course Number: 07:966:492
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The design program introduces students to UK theater practices by completing a series of increasingly challenging, professionally-oriented studio projects. They are encouraged to form and present their artistic vision for productions in response to both Shakespeare and contemporary play texts through cross-disciplinary collaboration with directors, other designers and technicians. They will also create and pursue a personally-crafted research project that makes the most of London’s rich resources.

12 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA Design & Costume Technology students in their third year of study.

Learning Goals of Course: On completion of the course, students will have learned to further develop or apply new media to communicate their ideas. They will have rigorously honed their awareness of how design impacts on performance space, actors and potential rehearsal processes using Shakespeare’s Globe and other spaces as a model for dynamic live events. Their research topics will enrich both their broader contextual learning and subject-specific interests in preparation for final semesters back at Mason Gross.

Instructor: Michael Pavelka, michael.pavelka@rutgers.edu

07:966:496 Professional Development

Professional Development

Course Number: 07:966:496
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students are provided with a comprehensive integration of career development approaches, entrepreneurial strategies, and explorations of regional, national, and global markets, movements, and players.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to BFA theater students.

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define and articulate their personal and professional goals.
  2. Network with peers and professionals.
  3. Speak knowledgably of theater makers currently working in the field.
  4. Manage the business/financial aspects of being a freelance artist.

Instructor: Christine Whalen, cmw@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:966:502 Theater History

Theater History

Course Number: 08:966:502

This course aims to develop a set of conceptual and analytical tools for the close reading and interpretation of plays as “blueprints” or “scores” for theatrical performance. It provides an analytical vocabulary useful both to students with a general interest in theater as an artistic and cultural form and to aspiring theater-makers, whether in acting, directing, design, dramaturgy, or other areas.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to MFA theater majors or by permission of instructor.

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will explore the historical context in which plays were written and major historical events and players that have significantly contributed to theater.
  • Students will leave the class with a better understanding that theater history must not be looked at as one movement leading to the next, but as a series of movements often occurring simultaneously and in conversation with one another.
  • Students will examine critically aesthetic and theoretical issues concerning theater and performance (SAS Core Curriculum AH.C.o.), as well as analyze theatrical literature in relation to specific histories, values, cultures, and technologies.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

Graduate Courses

08:966:531 Playwrights Seminar

Playwrights Seminar

Course Number: 08:966:531
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Concentrated work in the theory and practice of playwriting. Completion of major dramatic writing projects each semester. Study of dramatic literature. Weekly group meetings supported by weekly individual tutorials.

6 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to MFA playwriting majors or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Kathleen Tolan, ktolan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:966:581 Script in Production

Script in Production

Course Number: 08:966:581
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Supervised work revising and perfecting a student-written dramatic script during an actual production.

BA credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to MFA playwriting majors.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Kathleen Tolan, ktolan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:966:586 Screenwriting

Screenwriting

Course Number: 08:966:586

An introduction to writing for film. Students develop their own screenplays as they examine different styles and genres of the medium. Course repeated.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to M.F.A. playwriting majors.

08:966:796 Professional Development

Professional Development

Course Number: 08:966:796
Course Format: Seminar

Students are provided with a comprehensive integration of career development approaches, entrepreneurial strategies, and explorations of regional, national, and global markets, movements, and players.

1 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to MFA theater majors.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu