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Art & Design Courses

07:080:101 The Creative Process Online

The Creative Process Online

Course Number: 07:080:101
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course will investigate how visual artists employ a creative process which develops their ideas visually. Students will learn from this and while working from a written assignment they will produce research material, and sketch book work undertaken using a range of processes and a variety of materials. This development work will lead to exciting original final outcomes.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:
The goal will be to produce a rich and exciting portfolio of original work to include textual and visual research, developmental art work, informed and inspired by the research process, and finally artwork outcomes of an original personal nature which show rigor and skill in both concepts and execution.

By participating in Rutgers “Discovering the Creative Process,” students will:

Demonstrate understanding of both historical and contemporary art design and popular culture in relation to a set theme. This will be explored through written and visual research.
Undertake wide ranging experimentation with traditional and more unusual materials and processes, identifying and evaluating the limitations and potential of these for creating ideas and developing solutions in support of discovering the creative process.
Produce a personal body of artwork upon which the student will verbally and textually reflect and evaluate what they have achieved.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Materials required for this course will be a range of drawing material and an A3 sketch book (White pages). As the course progresses students will need other art materials dependent on how their work progresses and direction they are taking conceptually. Initial reading material will be provided and as the course progresses students will need reading material of a personal nature dependent on their lines of investigation and this will be discussed at personal tutorials and during class discussions.

Instructor: Anne Edwards, aedwards@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:131 Art Appreciation Online

Art Appreciation Online

Course Number: 07:080:131
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Do you appreciate art but cannot find the words to talk about it? Are there events in paintings or sculpture that you can feel but don’t know how to express? The online course in Art Appreciation is an opportunity to look at many pieces of artwork and to learn “art talk.” Travel around the world on your computer to look at all kinds of fine art. This is not an Art History course. The emphasis is on looking and understanding what you see.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Course Objectives: We will look at the art from many cultures of the world. You will learn how to see rather than assume, “Seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees.”* At the end of this course you will know how to use the basic vocabulary of visual art. You will be able to walk into an art gallery or art museum knowing how to discuss your observations and communicate them to others.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  1. Understand and use course visual art terms - Quizzes, Final Examination
  2. Make comparisons and contrasts among different visual art types. Midterm, Unit Discussion 
  3. Have an understanding of the vastness of the art world and of what is included in that world. Blog entries, Museum Review.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments:

  • Class Participation/Unit Discussion: 23% - time spent reading course material; ongoing, grade includes discussion postings for each unit.
  • Blog: 22% - ongoing, 5 posts a unit for each of the 13 Units, a total of 65. Graded in three Periods, scroll all the way down in Modules, see Student Blogs for full information and dates and find your assigned Blog page.
  • Three Quizzes, all together equal 5%
    • Quiz One - 1%
    • Quiz Two - 2%
    • Quiz Three - 2%
  • Mid-Term Exam: 15%
  • Museum Review: 20%
  • Final Exam: 15%

Instructors: Anne McKeown, annem@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Ulrika Andersson, ua43@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Milcah Bassel, mb1062@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Donna R. Brown, dbrown74@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Brent Dickinson, bd295@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Thomas Paul Raggio, traggio@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Erin Treacy, et255@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:132 Art Appreciation Online Short Course

Art Appreciation Online Short Course

Course Number: 07:080:132
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a compressed, 2-credit course.

Do you appreciate art but cannot find the words to talk about it? Are there events in paintings or sculpture that you can feel but don’t know how to express? The online course in Art Appreciation is an opportunity to look at many pieces of artwork and to learn “art talk”. Travel around the world on your computer to look at all kinds of fine art. This is not an Art History course. The emphasis is on looking and understanding what you see.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Understand and use course visual art terms
  • Make comparisons and contrasts among different visual art types
  • Have an understanding of the vastness of the art world and of what is included in that world

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments

  • Class Participation/Unit Discussion: 23%.
  • Blog: 22%
  • Four Quizzes, all together equal 10%
  • Museum Review - 25%
  • Final Exam - 20%

Instructors: Amanda J. Thackray, afinite@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Rita Leduc, deanger@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:133 Design Appreciation Online

Design Appreciation Online

Course Number: 07:080:133
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Design is about progress. It is the conceptualization and creation of new things: ideas, interactions, information, objects, typefaces, books, posters, products, places, signs, systems, services, furniture, websites, and more. This course introduces significant developments in the history of design in Europe and America from 1880 to present. The curriculum will examine a variety of object types, including furniture, interiors, graphics, fashion and products, and draw examples from the well-known, as well as, the anonymous. Throughout, design will be situated within its social, cultural, political and economic contexts. The changing role of the designer, the effects of the shifting ways of life on patterns of production and consumption, and the future of design will be considered.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goal: This course aims to provide you with a framework of interpretive skills useful to understanding design. The class will consider design in fields such as architecture, product design, graphic design, landscape design and digital design. By the end of this course, you will have established a personal reflective and examined position in relation to design in both a historical and contemporary environment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, students should be able to:

  • Describe the role, purpose and function of design in their environment.
  • Analyze the cultural, social, political and economic representations of European and American design movements and topics from 1880 to the present.
  • Apply design knowledge in a complex and open-ended context, selecting relevant evidence and critical analysis.
  • Interpret the importance of a designer’s work and legacy to the history of design through research.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Most materials are available on the course website.
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Assignments may include presentations, peer reviews, discussion posts, papers, and projects.
Instructor: Ingrid Steiner, is354@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:215 Graphic Design for Everybody Online

Graphic Design for Everybody Online

Course Number: 07:080:215
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Catalog Course Description: Onscreen and in print, we are entertained, challenged, instructed and informed by an expanding variety of visual messages. The ubiquity of visual communication in the twenty-first century has made us, as a society, savvy observers of graphic design. The many accessible professional-level tools have made it increasingly possible for non-designers to meaningfully contribute to this visual landscape. In this course, students from all areas of study will be introduced to the skills, strategies, techniques and tools of graphic design for the purpose of enhancing everyday communications within their own environment. Applications for these skills range from the practical to the expressive and include social media graphics, flyers, poster presentations, slide shows, resumes and even zines. Through readings and online lectures as well as several hands-on exercises and three full-scale projects, the class will explore a core set of subjects in visual communication including color, typography, imagery and composition. Projects will explore the considerations of time-based visual presentations; effective messaging using imagery; and organizing content using visual hierarchies. While our studies will be framed by the needs of everyday applications, students will be building a conceptual foundation of knowledge that can be leveraged in a wide variety of practical, activist and artistic contexts.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goals: Students will increase their visual vocabulary and knowledge of key principles through lectures, readings and direct observation. They will also master a selection of professional techniques and tools through online tutorials, written instruction from the instructor and practical application. Focused short exercises will encourage understanding of discrete visual principles through experimentation. Later in the semester, students will fully leverage the design process by producing three projects requiring them to synthesize all the skills they practiced in the exercises. Because the content of this course is intended to be accessible to all students including those outside the visual arts community, the primary emphasis will be on efficacy and creative use of technique over pure invention. However, work done during the semester can easily serve as a foundation for further personal expression or as a launching point for deeper study in the field of graphic design.

Course Objectives

  1. Students will become proficient in a variety of digital tools including free online software designed for the layperson as well as select aspects of professional software such as the Adobe Creative Suite through the review of online tutorials and the practice demanded by the completion of the exercises and projects.
  2. Students will build a foundational understanding of color, composition, type, image, order and expression through a series of focused practical exercises encouraging experimentation and direct observation. Students will demonstrate their understanding of these core concepts by applying what they have observed in the exercises to three final projects. Each project represents a typical category of visual communication: a digital promotional flyer and social media post; a printed handout organizing multi-leveled information; and a multi-frame, time-based presentation.
  3. Students will learn how to discuss visual media in clear language by responding to prompts from the instructor in the class discussion forum. Students will also use this forum to share constructive feedback about each other’s work at all stages of the design process.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  1. Observe examples of visual communication with a critical eye and convey their observations to others in clear language as well as participate constructively in discussions of their own work and that of their peers.
  2. Use professional software such as Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop (as well as common online alternatives such as Canva) for the purpose of page layout, image editing, image sequencing, and typesetting.
  3. Leverage their knowledge of objective visual principles and specialized graphic design techniques to enhance everyday communications.
  4. Gain the confidence in visual communication required to pursue projects of personal expression and/or further study in the field of graphic design should they so choose

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Students must have consistent access to:

  • reliable high-speed internet
  • a computer capable of running image editing software
  • appropriately outfitted computers are available in Rutgers computer labs throughout campus (more information about Rutgers computer labs can be found here (Links to an external site.).)
  • if a student wishes to work on their own computer, they will need a machine that has at least 8GB of RAM and a Solid-State Drive with a modern processor (8th generation or newer) is recommended. An external graphics card is preferred over integrated graphics.
  • A camera or smart phone
  • Software: Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Photoshop CC, and Adobe Acrobat CC
    • Rutgers computer labs throughout campus are standardly equipped with Adobe CC software (more information about Rutgers computer labs can be found here) Computer labs have the benefit of large, professional-grade monitors and (usually) on-site tech support.
    • Rutgers students can also activate a FREE subscription to the Adobe Creative Suite through the Rutgers software portal. (This is not to be confused with Adobe's ""free trial", which has a 30-day limit. The Rutgers FREE subscription is a full subscription to the Adobe Creative Suite that does not expire during the student's enrollment at Rutgers.)

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
Students will be responsible for the following assignments:

  • Readings – Students will be assigned a number of readings relating to the subjects of graphic design and visual communication throughout the semester. All readings will be provided on CANVAS as downloadable PDFs or as links to online content.
  • Lectures – Weekly “lectures” (available on CANVAS in written form) will introduce concepts and provide background material necessary for the completion of the exercises and projects.
  • Discussion Board Posts – Throughout the semester, students will be expected to contribute thoughtful and constructive posts to the CANVAS discussion board. In this forum, students will be asked to: respond to prompts relating to reading assignments and lectures; post reflections on selected practical exercises; submit their own work for feedback as well as provide feedback on the work of fellow students. The discussion forum is exactly that—a discussion—therefore students will be expected to review (and reference) other students’ posts as context when contributing their own. Posting dates will be listed in the course schedule. Weekly prompts will be listed in the course announcements.
  • Assessments – Periodically students will be given short ""open-book"" quizzes as a means to review lecture and reading material.
  • Software Tutorials – Links to LinkedIn Learning tutorials (accessible via the student’s Rutgers student account) will be provided to accompany assignments via the course announcements whenever new digital skills will be used.
  • Exercises – Students will complete a series of discrete exercises designed to develop skills in the following areas: image collection; image editing; combining type and image; typesetting; dynamic composition; practical color theory; page layout; and image-making. Exercises are designed to encourage first-hand observation of visual principles discussed in the lectures and readings.
  • Projects – Students will apply the skills introduced in the exercises to the following projects.
    • An activism graphic to motivate and educate
    • A festival schedule to increase information accessibility
    • A type/image booklet to present a multilayered subject

Course Structure

  • Modules: Each weekly module includes some combination of lectures, readings, exercises, discussion posts, assessments, peer critiques and project milestones.
  • Lectures: The lectures are where you'll find the practical and background information that will frame the week's exercise or project milestone.
  • Reflect & Review. This is a mixed bag of mini assignments such as assessments, reflection posts or critiques. Details will be provided in the weekly announcement and will vary over the course of the semester.
  • Tutorials: You will be periodically asked to complete tech tutorials via Linked-In Learning or Adobe.com to support skills needed for the weekly assignment. Various step-by-step guides will also be provided as needed.
  • Tips & Tech: This is a catch-all page meant to take the place of information that would be shared via a whiteboard during in-class work time if this were an in-person class. This is where I'd include special notes about technology, or things to look out for relating to the work being done that week. I often update this page during the week with new notes as students get more involved in an exercise and issues arise that might be helpful to share with the whole group (you will receive an announcement alerting you that new info has been added in this case).
  • Readings: Readings may complement the lectures with additional information or viewpoints, or they may present the lecture material in a different way as a means of shoring up knowledge in a particular area. Many readings are listed in the syllabus ahead of time, and I will add others as we move through the semester. You will not need to purchase any texts for this class—excerpts and links will be provided as needed.
  • Exercises: Exercises typically span a single week and focus on individual skills or concepts allowing you to explore the design principles discussed in the lectures widely and freely. Experimentation is encouraged so that you can observe firsthand what works, what doesn't, and what falls somewhere in between.
  • Projects: Projects span multiple weeks and require you to put several skills or concepts to practical use at the same time. Projects are broken into weekly ""milestones"" to facilitate a thorough exploration and sketching process.
  • Process: The design process is by nature iterative—the best work makes itself known when comparing alternate approaches side by side. For each assignment (both projects and exercises) you will be asked to generate and submit a large number of exploration sketches along with your final drafts. You will often be expected to explore the ""what-ifs"" to determine the most successful solution. All stages of an assignment—from concept exploration to final draft—will be considered in the grading rubric.
  • Schedule: Each week's module is made available starting at 9:00 am on Tuesday. The assignments in each module are expected to be completed and submitted no later than 11:00 pm on the following Monday (unless otherwise noted). You may spread out the work over the week any way that you like, but don't be tempted to wait until Sunday to get started—you will not be able to effectively complete all 7–9 hours of work in one marathon day. It is also especially important to make sure that you have throughly reviewed the week's module—including any technology requirements—no later than Friday morning so that you can ask questions and get answers ahead of the weekend. I'm afraid that a Sunday night (or Monday morning) revelation that something won't download or activate or save properly won't be a reason for a deadline extension.
  • Workload & Engagement:
    • Students should plan their weekly schedules to accommodate about 7–9 hours per week of engagement for this class. And while there is no requirement to be online at specific times, it is important to leave time to troubleshoot technical issues and ask questions with enough time left to complete the assignments. Depending on your experience and comfort level, you may want to leave a little extra time for the learning curve involved in navigating new technology.
    • With a few extreme exceptions, there is no equivalent of an ""excused absence"" for an asynchronous class. By nature, an asynchronous class already has flexibility built in to the schedule to accommodate to scheduling pitfalls. Weekly assignments build upon each other and set the student up with skills needed for longer term projects so coursework is expected be completed by the dates listed.
    • Most technology failures are not reasons for missed due dates. As one who has shed more than a few tears over lost/corrupted files, I STRONGLY encourage you to make use of a cloud-based file management app such as Dropbox.com (there is a robust free version available to all). More than just cloud storage, Dropbox.com operates by automatically updating copies of your local files with saved versions stored in the cloud.
    • Lectures and readings are very important parts of the weekly modules, but note that the bulk of your time will be spent executing design exercises (there are 9) and multipart projects (there are 3).
  • Late Work: The following policies will be followed for late work:
    • Exercises: Exercises not turned in on time may be turned in up to two weeks after the due date for reduced credit. Late exercises will be graded according to the rubric and then reduced by 25%. After two weeks, no credit will be given for late work.
    • Projects: Project due dates are outlined on the syllabus, though rarely a due date may be adjusted based on unforeseen circumstances such as global technical challenges or holidays. You will also receive reminders for upcoming due dates via the weekly class announcements. Like exercises, Projects 1 & 2 submitted late will be graded according to the rubric and then reduced by 25%. Project 3 will not be accepted late due to the limitations of the end of the semester.
    • Project milestones: Project milestones are integral in keeping you on track for completing the long-term projects. Milestones are not graded in and of themselves, but "process" is an important part of the grading rubric so late or missing milestones will affect the overall project grade.
    • Discussion Posts, Quizzes and Critiques: Late submissions for will not be accepted for credit.
  • Homework: I will post a class announcement during the day on Tuesday of each week outlining the details of that week's module.

Instructor: Jennifer Domer, js2061@rutgers.edu

07:080:233 Multimedia Art: Sound Online

Multimedia Art: Sound Online

Course Number: 07:080:233
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

We’ll explore the exciting and emerging field of sound art. Did you ever wonder where sound sampling came from? This course will include a look at the impact of experimental sound on contemporary culture. Students will be exposed to a variety of  historic works from such movements as Dada, Futurism, Fluxus, and video art.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goal: To enrich student knowledge of multimedia
art and cross disciplinary expression.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should
be able to:

  1. To develop the ability to comprehend, analyze, describe and
    discuss sound as an art form from a multidisciplinary perspective.
  2. To demonstrate knowledge of influential multidisciplinary
    artists and eras of dialogue.
  3. To articulate, in written form, sound art terminology, and
    aesthetic concepts.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Course assignments include discussion threads, exams, and projects.
Instructor: Damian Catera, dcatera@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:300 Media Art and You: Creativity in the Digital Age Online

Media Art and You: Creativity in the Digital Age Online

Course Number: 07:080:300
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

In this course, you will create original  media works in a variety of forms including documentary, narrative, experimental and performance, which are inspired by your own experiences. We will primarily focus on increasing the creative depth of your projects, the ideas that inform them and the technical capabilities that are crucial to their realization.

Students will emerge from this course with a better understanding of the building blocks of media production including, but not limited to: production planning, storyboarding,  shot composition, and sound design.

Additionally, students will develop a critical engagement with historic and contemporary media works through screenings and discussions. The course is open to students of all skill levels.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goal: To create original media pieces and to enrich student knowledge of media production and its cultural context.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  1. Create well executed, original works with digital video in a variety of forms. Engage critically in the process of creative expression.
  2. Analyze, comprehend and discuss creative media works in video and film
  3. Demonstrate an enriched knowledge of theoretical frameworks relating to creativity.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Course Assignments will include discussion threads, creative projects, and journaling.
Instructor Damian Catera, dcatera@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:301 net.art: Visual and Contemporary Arts Practices in Online Media Online

net.art: Visual and Contemporary Arts Practices in Online Media Online

Course Number: 07:080:301
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Net art became a notable branch in media art with the popularization of internet cultures and availability of the information systems to masses. Net art today mainly deals with network cultures. According to Broeckmann: “Time, space, speed, collective creativity and communication are the primary themes of the projects that were realized in these fields."

This online course, true to its medium, will help students to discover a medium for artistic practice and presentation: the concepts, aesthetics, and techniques critical to the exploration of network culture, authoring of hypertext, interactive art works which use the protocols and infrastructure of the internet and emerging networks as vehicles for content delivery, creation and preservation.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Talk and think critically regard art which uses the internet as its medium, as well as other new media art forms.
  • Have a good knowledge of the history of the internet and its infrastructure, as well as the history of expression utilizing the internet.

Instructor: Jett Strauss, jgs162@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:331 Digital Photo Image Online

Digital Photo Image Online

Course Number: 07:080:331
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Explore the technical and the creative principles of beginning digital photography. Students will develop their own analytical eye for framing and composing photographs as well as working with their digital camera and basic Photoshop to develop a personal workflow. In addition to readings, audio and visual lessons and feedback will be provided for both the technical and creative components of this class.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Learning Objectives/Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student will:

  • Have developed knowledge of photography aesthetics and visual communication.
  • Demonstrate thorough knowledge and application of DSLR camera techniques.
  • Acquire knowledge of historical influences and movements and contemporary trends in photography.

Required and Recommended Course Materials

  • A DSLR camera or a camera capable of changing the F-Stop, ISO, and Shutter speed.
  • Access to Photoshop CS4 or above.
  • No books are required for this class.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Requirements/Rules:

  • Must have a working Camera.
  • No use of Cell Phones for photo assignments
  • Student are responsible to turn in their assignments. (The instructor will NOT NOTIFY you if you miss an assignment.)
  • I will not accept assignments once the class ends.
  • Any un-submitted assignments will be marked with a 0.

Type of Assessments:

  • Discussion Forum/Class Participation: 20 points in total
  • Photo Assignments: 60 points in total
  • Exams: 20 points in total

Instructor: Tyson Washburn, twashburn@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:080:345 Global Perspectives in Design History Online

Global Perspectives in Design History Online

Course Number: 07:080:345
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is an introduction to 20th- and 21st-century design history viewed through a comparative lens using case studies from around the globe. Through text, image, discussion, and writing, this course explores historical conditions and topical issues that have shaped design practices, systems, and production in order to lead students to better understand disciplinary, conceptual, material, and aesthetic issues affecting design today. Students are expected to analyze how meaning and value are constructed and mediated over time with an introduction to a variety of theoretical frameworks. The anticipated result will be conceptual and practical connections between past and present, among multiple design disciplines, and across a geographically diverse landscape.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course
Course Goal: Each meeting will focus on a key design concept, which will be ex­plored and discussed through a diverse selection of images and texts by relevant historians, theoreticians, and designers. Balanc­ing historical specificity with evolving conceptual questions, the course will help to explain why things happened when they did and how they shaped the practices, mediation, production, and consumption of design, particularly through transnational exchange.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Apply the analytical skills needed to conduct and present re­search and conclusions in verbal and written form
  • Demonstrate a historical understanding of both disciplinary and conceptual issues which have shaped design practices
  • Demonstrate critical analysis of design objects

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Charlotte Fiell and Peter Fiell. 100 Ideas That Changed Design. Laurence King Publishing, 2019

  • ISBN: 9781786273437
  • ISBN-10: 1786273438

There are no additional materials required for this course. All materials, including readings and multimedia are contained in the course website.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Assignments:

  • Weekly Response Blog (9 informal discussion blog posts on Canvas)
  • Quizzes (3 Quizzes based on course texts)
  • Term Paper (5- to 6-page term paper)

Course Grading
Grading is based on the assignments:

  • Blog-45%
  • Quizzes-30%
  • Term Paper-25%

Instructor: Dara Kiese, dk887@rutgers.edu

07:080:431 Social Media for the Arts Online

Social Media for the Arts Online

Course Number: 07:080:431
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

A “must-take” for ambitious artists in any discipline. “Social Media for the Arts” provides visual and performing artists with the skills to promote their work and advance their careers in today’s competitive market. By focusing on the most cutting-edge digital marketing tools, it teaches artists how to reach and effectively communicate with their target audiences. Topics covered include, among others, website strategies, blogging and micro-blogging, Facebook and Twitter strategies, video campaigns, and mobile tactics.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Goals:

  • Develop professional, scientific, and artistic opportunities by harnessing social media analytics.
  • Develop an online presence on various well-known social media platforms including Blogs, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, Yelp, Google+, Search Engines, etc.
  • Create or ideate content for various social media channels employing page tagging and metadata to promote business and personal goals.
  • Become familiar with Search Engine Optimization and Web Analytics (as well as other types of analytics and Big Data)
  • Learn to find, develop and connect with influencers and get to pitch them on your project and promote your career.
  • Use Instagram and Pinterest for trendspotting or to promote your brand, artwork, fashion, or other imagery.
  • Develop an understanding of new technologies such as augmented and virtual reality, algorithms, Big Data and audience targeting techniques and technologies in use by most Social Media platforms for their advertising offerings.
  • A new module on Text Analytics and Text Mining adds to student understandings of Social Media and how the data mined and used by organizations based on what we write and post images of.
  • Learn to curate and audit the student’s own online channels to remove unneeded content, create new content that better reflects the student favorably.
  • Experiment with creating viral content through video, photos, memes, textual posts, and geo-location check-ins.
  • Explore Geolocation and the pros and cons of sharing our data in Social Media.
  • To summarize your social media presence while learning what works and what doesn't.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Develop a working knowledge and personal viewpoint regarding the tools and technology of the 21st century and the Internet.
  • Integrate topical knowledge of the Social Media platforms with critical thinking, provide good, current information to help students navigate Social Media and Big Data technologies and arts in 2022.
  • Create new business and creative opportunities with social media and its analytics.
  • Develop a personal approach to various aspects of digital branding, marketing, and advertising.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Final Grade Calculation (Percentage/Points)

  • 35%/352 - Online Assessments with survey forms, auto graded and monitored at the end of the semester
  • 22.5%/210 - Midterm, Final Exam + Respondus Onboarding Quiz
  • 8%/80 - Journal
  • 18%/180 - Discussion Boards

Instructor: Marshall Sponder, ms2583@business.rutgers.edu

Dance Courses

07:203:101 Dance Appreciation

Dance Appreciation

Course Number: 07:203:101
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Dance Appreciation is an introduction to dance as an art form, wherein students study the historical, cultural, social and performative contexts of diverse dance forms. Students engage with aesthetic, theoretical, and scholarly discourses aimed at illuminating how dance functions as a form of communication and personal, aesthetic expression.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: By exploring the ways in which dance both reflects and comments upon contemporary society, students will demonstrate comprehension in their utilization of dance vocabulary and terminology and articulate critical conclusions about the reciprocal relationship between dance, the arts and societal concerns.

Instructor: Stephen O'Connell, soconnell@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:110 Intro. to Urban Fusion Dance

Intro. to Urban Fusion Dance

Course Number: 07:203:110
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The study of fusion dance evolving from traditional and contemporary African and African diasporic dance forms, including contemporary social dances (for example: "The Dougie," "Gangnam Style," "Harlem Shake," and "Krumping"). This is a high-impact aerobic technique. Students will be introduced to these dance forms through studio practice, video, master classes, and performance.

2 credit(s)

07:203:123 Modern Dance I

Modern Dance I

Course Number: 07:203:123
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to the fundamentals of movement skills and body awareness in modern dance technique, improvisation, and composition.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Required course for BA Dance Majors and minors. Open to nonmajors.

Learning Goals of Course: Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles and movement concepts used in modern dance technique. Dancers will explore proper body alignment, creative movement, composition, and improvisation in class. Through varying assignments, students will understand modern dance technique as an artistic form, while developing their voices as both dancers and composers.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students must wear appropriate clothing which is moveable and unrestrictive. Clothing must allow the joints to be seen, or for warmth at the beginning of class. Students will be dancing in bare feet.

07:203:123 Modern Dance I

Modern Dance II

Course Number: 07:203:124

07:203:131 Dance Appreciation Online

Dance Appreciation Online

Course Number: 07:203:131
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Dance Appreciation Online is an introduction to dance as an art form, wherein students study the historical, cultural, social and performative contexts of diverse dance forms. Students engage with aesthetic, theoretical, and scholarly discourses aimed at illuminating how dance functions as a form of communication and personal, aesthetic expression. In addition, students explore the ways in which dance both reflects and comments upon contemporary society. Students develop fundamental dance literacy through critical analysis of dance in live and recorded formats; identify aesthetic concepts and ideas through written and visual media; demonstrate comprehension in their utilization of dance vocabulary and terminology; discuss influential choreographers and genres of dance; and articulate critical conclusions about the reciprocal relationship between dance, the arts and societal concerns.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course
Course Learning Objectives:

  • To develop the ability to perceive, analyze, describe, discuss, and understand dance as an art form across cultures and forms.
  • To identify and discuss the social, cultural, and historical contexts of diverse dance forms.
  • To define and describe the elements of dance composition.
  • To demonstrate knowledge of influential choreographers and eras of dance.
  • To articulate dance terminology and aesthetic concepts through both written and kinesthetic formats.
  • To refine critical analytical skills through viewing dance in live and recorded formats and presenting ideas in written and visual media.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Lecture Content: You must prepare the online lecture content for every course. This is your means of "attending" the course and your best opportunity for achieving the course learning goals.

Reading: Moderate - In order to complete the assessment components of the course, including threaded discussions, writing assignments, exams and the final project, you need to complete all assigned readings each week.

Videos: Heavy - Material from the videos will be included in the exams. It is essential that you watch all videos from start to finish, for exam content and for ideas for building your final project. You will not be able to successfully complete this course if you do not complete all video viewing.

Assignments and activities for the course (1000 points). For each assignment, check the Rubric in your ASSIGNMENT DUE DATES & RUBRICS Module for detailed grading criteria.

  • “I Understand” Quiz: Checks understanding of course logistics and expectations. Details in course content. (40 points)
  • "Your Move" (Introduction): You get 30 points for introducing yourself to the class!
  • "Your Move" (Threaded Discussions): There are 3 "Your Move" discussion assignments. (30 points each)
  • Quick Quizzes: There are 4 quick quizzes to check for content knowledge. (50 points each)
  • Dance Video Analysis: There are 2 dance video analysis assignments. (The first is worth 50 points; the second is worth 100 points.)
  • Cultural Response Assignments: There are 2 cultural response assignments. (100 points each)
  • Respondus Set Up for Exam 1 (30 points)
  • Exams: 2 Multiple Choice Exams (130 points each)

Instructors: Darrah Carr, dacarr@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Kathleen Flynn Gavin, katfly@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Stephen O'Connell, soconnell@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:132 History of Broadway Dance Online

History of Broadway Dance Online

Course Number: 07:203:132
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Explores the evolution of dance in musical theater and on Broadway. Course topics will include a historical survey of dance on Broadway; an examination of the reciprocal relationship of Broadway dance to economic and cultural change; and a close look at the power structure and organization of Broadway musicals. The evolution of Broadway dance steps and styles and the contribution of notable dancers will be examined.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Organize Broadway dance and musical theatre on a timeline of relevant historical and economic issues.
  • Compare Broadway dances across decades to understand the evolution of Broadway dance through history.
  • Understand the reciprocal relationship of culture and the arts, specifically culture and dance.
  • Recognize notable Broadway choreographers and be able to evaluate each choreographer’s specific contributions to Broadway dance and musical theatre history.
  • Analyze Broadway dance choreography to differentiate historical, cultural and artistic components.
  • View, evaluate and critique Broadway dance using formalistic/artistic properties and from the perspective of an informed audience.
  • Articulate written evaluations and critiques of Broadway dance using domain specific language.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Assignments (Total of 900 points):

  • “I Understand” Word Doc Submission – 40 points
  • Class Discussion (5) – 150 points (30 points each)
  • Journal Entries (3) – 90 points (30 points each)
  • Dance Video Analysis - Form (2) – 80 points (40 per assignment)
  • Broadway Dance Video Analysis (3) – 150 points (50 per assignment)
  • Written Responses (6) – 240 (40 points each)
  • Includes 2 "Get Up and Dance" options to replace Written Responses.
  • Peer Review of Final Presentation – 30 points
  • Broadway Analysis Presentation - Rough Draft - 20 points
  • Broadway Analysis Final Presentation – 100 points

Instructor: Andrew Greenspan, ag1224@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:133 Dance in Istanbul Online

Dance in Istanbul Online

Course Number: 07:203:133
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

An overview of dance in Istanbul from the 16th century to the present including the implications of modernity, gender, state, and religion on dance forms, with a brief summary of debates regarding the dancing body in Turkish Islamic culture. Belly dance will be explored using different points of view within the contexts of Orientalism, feminism, and exoticism. Dances in religious rituals and sacred ceremonies of the present day will be examined through text and video.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able:

  • To develop an understanding of the relationships between dance and history, dance, and society.
  • To apply concepts of sociology and the social sciences to dance.
  • To give attention to the discursive articulations that embody every dance practice.
  • To improve awareness of the cognitive and intellectual discourse of dance, including the understanding between choreographers, dancers, and audiences.
  • To learn perceptions of dancing in Turkish-Islamic culture.
  • To understand the role of gender in dancer identity and dance forms in the classical age of the Ottoman Empire.
  • To appreciate the role of dance in the rituals of Sunni, Mevlevis, and the ceremonies of Shia Alevis.
  • To analyze belly dance in relation to the concepts of gender, Orientalism, and exoticism.
  • To understand the ramifications of the concept of ‘modernity’ behind the introduction of Western dance forms to Turkey.
  • To evaluate the main influences of democracy and civil society behind the motives for the development of the contemporary dance scene in Istanbul.

CORE Curriculum Learning Goals met by this Course: (AH o and p)

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Grading is based on the assignments:

  • Midterm - 12.5%
  • Compare and contrast essay - 10%
  • Final project - 20%
  • Writing assignments - 31.5%
  • Discussion board - 23%
  • I understand quiz 2%

Instructor: Ayrin Ersoz, ae206@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:134 Dance in Israel Online

Dance in Israel Online

Course Number: 07:203:134
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Survey of Israel's concert dance history, from roots in imported styles in the pre- and immediate post-state decades to the blossoming of a homegrown Israeli contemporary dance within the last few decades. Topics include aesthetic influences, significant artists, and recent innovations, with discussions about technical, stylistic, and thematic concerns. Throughout the course, dance is situated within a larger historical, sociopolitical context, and connections to politics, nationalism, religion, ethnicity, and culture are considered.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Learning Objectives/Outcomes
By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read and critically analyze dance as an art form
  • Understand how dance in Israel developed in relation to historical and cultural developments
  • Recognize aesthetic and ideological influences and representations in Israeli choreography
  • Be familiar with key choreographers and their work and contribution
  • Analyze and identify various dance genres and styles in their cultural and aesthetic contexts
  • Comprehend cultural and social theoretical terms in relation to dance analysis

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Assignments are expected to be turned into Canvas by the assigned due date. Technology failures may not be accepted as reason for missed assignment due dates. Therefore, do not leave anything to the last minute. Back up files frequently and in various locations so work is not lost. It is the student’s responsibility to alert the instructor of a technology issue immediately so that the instructor can identify alternative ways to complete or submit an assignment.

Survey of assignments types:

  • (1%) Confirming e-mail: 10 points
  • (51.5%) Dance Analysis: Short written essays (x18): 515 points
  • (4%) Dance Analysis: Online group discussion (x2): 40 points
  • (6%) Image Analysis: Short written essays (x3): 60 points
  • (8 %) Content Analysis: Short written essays (x3):80 points
  • (5%) Personal Reflection: Short written/visual essays (x2): 50 points
  • (6.5%) Other: Reconstructing a short dance; Curating an exhibition; Creating a photo of Tableau Vivant (x3): 65 points
  • (18%) Final Assignment: Dance Analysis: Long Essay: 180 points (1200-1500 words, with a minimum of 10 in-text citations from this unit's bibliographic references. MLA or Chicago style guide for formatting).

Instructor: Yael Nativ, ynativ@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Iris Lana, ilana@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:135 Dance Forms of Africa Online

Dance Forms of Africa Online

Course Number: 07:203:135
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Explores dance forms from different cultures in different blocks on the African continent. Through readings, viewings, and engagement with movement, students use skills of observation, movement learning, and contextual and comparative analysis, focusing on the social, cultural, religious, and political significance of African dance forms. Types and functions of traditional African dances, contexts of performance, and their unique characteristics will also be explored.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: The purpose of this course is to develop awareness, understanding and appreciation of African dance forms to include their histories, socio-cultural functions, and cultural meanings. The primary focus is to offer students an opportunity to gain knowledge about African dance cultures by providing a lens for understanding social/cultural values, norms, and beliefs, as we consider how these elements are reflected in the dances of various African tribal groups. Through readings, viewings, and engagement with dance, students will develop the awareness that one has a view of the world that is not universally shared.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Understand the close relationship between African music and dance, and how that shapes African dance performances.
  • Develop awareness that one has a view of the world that is not universally shared. Demonstrate an understanding of how dance contributes to ‘community building’ and the maintenance of African traditions and culture.
  • Discuss how African dances are shaped by the history, cultural and social values, and beliefs of the people. Discuss how a person’s socio-cultural location is related to aesthetic preferences and movement choices.
  • Critically evaluate African dance forms on the basis of their peculiar characteristics and from the perspective of an informed audience.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Assignments:

  • Analysis Paper: Students will be required to write a two-page analysis paper based on specific reading assignments. Instructions /guidelines for this paper will be provided.
  • Midterm Research Project: Students will conduct research on a festival from the African country they choose to be identified with at the beginning of the semester, and present their findings in a blog.
  • Synthesis Paper: Students will write a three-page synthesis paper based on readings, viewings, and class discussions. Instructions /guidelines for this paper will be provided.
  • Research Project: This project is a ‘salad bowl.’ Students will be drawing from assignments two and three, as well as conduct a little research to ‘garnish’ the project. Prompts will be provided, and project will be presented in a blog.
  • Weekly Discussions: Weekly readings will be assigned in each unit, and students will respond to specific prompts from the instructor. These responses will serve as the basis for our weekly class discussions.

Course Grading:

  • Analysis Paper -10%
  • Midterm Research Project - 20%
  • Synthesis Paper -12%
  • Final Research Project - 25%
  • Student Journal Entries - 11%
  • Weekly Discussion board - 22%.

Instructor: Beatrice T. Ayi, ba253@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:136 Dance in India Online

Dance in India Online

Course Number: 07:203:136
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Covers a wide range of forms practiced in India in the 20th and 21st century, including folk dances, classical dance styles, contemporary choreography, and film dances, among others. Also looks beyond India, into the diaspora and global contexts in which Indian dance forms are practiced. Methods include analysis of readings, video documentaries, dance films, and interviews, as well as concept mapping. Practical engagement with movement material and aesthetic principles included.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:The goal of this course is to critically introduce students to a wide variety of dance forms coexisting in India today, through analysis of readings, videos (dance, documentaries and interviews) and some practical engagement. The students should gain the ability to distinguish and critically discuss select dance forms from India in terms of the categorizations of dance genres/forms and an understanding of the interconnections of historical, dance historical and aesthetic developments as well as questions of cultural identity. Further, students shall become attentive to migrations and trans- and intercultural entanglements in the context of dance in India, i.e. the ways in which the dances, dance forms, aesthetic influences and contents can move to different geographical areas, different contexts, different populations and thereby change and attain new meanings.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Identify and distinguish select dance forms from the subcontinent in relation to categorizations such as traditional, classical, folk, tribal, contemporary, modern, and film dance, as well as name important exponents or choreographers of specific forms, where applicable.
  • Articulate a critical working knowledge of the categories traditional, classical, folk, modern, contemporary, and film dance.
    Recognize and communicate basic aesthetic elements and principles of classical Indian dance (relating to rhythm, storytelling, and ‘expression’).
  • Discuss and analyze selected creative and choreographic approaches to modern and contemporary Indian dance, using thick description and basic methods of choreographic analysis
  • Critically analyze and articulate selected Indian dance forms in relation to questions of history (e.g. colonialism) and cultural identity.
  • Formulate and express distinctions in select dance forms from the subcontinent in the context of migrations (e.g.: classical dance in the diaspora, Bhangra in UK, Bollywood live dance across the world, the dance of the Sidi-Goma in India)
  • Communicate competent analysis of written materials and documentaries/interviews in relation to dance, as well as video-recordings of dances.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading is based on assignments, a midterm, and a long final essay.

Final Grade Calculation

  • 67.5% Assignments (keywords, blog/journal, practical, dance analyses)
  • 12.5% Midterm
  • 20% Final

Instructor: Sandra Chatterjee, schatterjee@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:149 Ballet I

Ballet I

Course Number: 07:203:149
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to ballet as an art form with an emphasis on traditional steps.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Students will apply correct body alignment and posture to ballet techniques and performing fundamental ballet conditioning exercises including correct breathing and turnout. They will recognize and apply ballet terminology as well as properly execute basic exercises of the ballet barre and center. Students will develop a sense of artistic expression as well as improved skill and strength.

07:203:149 Ballet I

Ballet II

Course Number: 07:203:150

07:203:155 Intro. Jazz Dance

Intro. Jazz Dance

Course Number: 07:203:155

Familiarizes non-dance majors to technical and performance aspects of jazz dance. The course introduces students to a variety of jazz styles to provide a broad foundation from which to select future training opportunities.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to non-dance majors only

07:203:160 Pilates Mat

Pilates Mat

Course Number: 07:203:160

Covers the 34 Pilates mat exercises as developed by Joseph and Clara Pilates. Variations and modifications for each of these exercises will also be taught in an effort to not only further explore the possibilities that the method offers, but to prevent injury and suit the needs of each student. Use of foam roller and magic circle props will be integrated into this practice.

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to dance majors, minors, and non-majors.

07:203:170 Yoga For Wellness

Yoga For Wellness

Course Number: 07:203:170

This course, specifically designed for the B.F.A., B.A., or dance minor student, will use the practice of anatomically centered hatha yoga as a means to deepen the training and facility of the student. Students will learn the historical beginnings of yoga, gaining a broad understanding of the cultural significance of this practice. Basic Sanskrit, Hindu mythology, and the culture of India will also be discussed.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to dance majors, minors, and non-majors.

07:203:250 Performing Climate Change

Performing Climate Change

Course Number: 07:203:250
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Use movement and dance to reflect on climate change and inspire action! All you need is an interest in climate change and a willingness to activate the creative imagination.

3 credits

07:206:370 History and Theory of Integrated Dance Online

History and Theory of Integrated Dance Online

Course Number: 07:206:370
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

The History and Theory of Integrated Dance offers a thorough investigation of the development of the integrated dance culture within the U.S. and internationally. The course traces the origins of disability dance back to the disability rights movement and the subsequent emergence of educational, recreational, and artistic opportunities for disabled populations. A theoretical understanding of integrated dance is developed through examining various models of disability and how they have developed historically and, specifically, how these models apply to education, physical recreation, and dance, in particular. The course investigates how perceptions of disability either challenge or reinforce ideas of ‘normalized’ bodies and how a dancing body might look. We explore the possibility that integrated dance creates its own theory. A broad understanding of diversity informs a "universal design" approach to developing both teaching and choreography that is inclusive, responsive, and ethical for dancers of all abilities.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Through this course, students will:

  • Examine how integrated dance has emerged out of a particular socio-political environment and a bio-politics.
  • Examine their own understandings and experience of disability by developing an awareness of disability culture and its progressive models.
  • Discuss the history of integrated dance, both in the U.S. and internationally, as an expression of difference and identity politics in dance terms.
  • Explore strategies and principles that support diversity, inclusion, equity, and access, and how they can be integrated into teaching and planning choreographic projects.
  • Explore teaching and choreographic processes that are inclusive and informed by the principle of universal design and, by doing so, develop an understanding of how to relate to and work with a range of abilities/disabilities by accommodating dancers with diverse needs.
  • Develop a model teaching seminar that exhibits a synthesized understanding of integrated dance within a range of selected topics

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand and articulate a variety of perspectives on the politics of difference and identity politics.
    Articulate their own understandings and experiences of disability through increased clarity on disability culture and its progressive models,
  • Use national and international integrated dance to exemplify an expressive culture that articulates the politics of difference and identity in dance terms
  • Demonstrate how disability dance culture expands reductive theories and practices to develop dance artists and teachers who value diversity, inclusion, equity and access.
  • Articulate how dance classes and dance choreography value artists with disabilities by incorporating strategies and principles that accommodate diversity.
  • Demonstrate synthesized knowledge on integrated dance in a range of selected topics using pedagogical skills appropriate for a selected disabled population

Instructor: Suzanne Cowan, sc2296@rutgers.edu

Filmmaking Courses

07:211:130 Video Editing Online

Video Editing Online

Course Number: 07:211:130
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is an introduction to both the technical and creative elements essential for video editing. In this class through reading and assignments, students will examine the role of video editors in the storytelling process. Students in the class will learn the tools necessary to manipulate existing footage into thoughtful and creative video edits using Adobe Premiere Pro software. Through a series of readings and provided video examples, the students will expand their understanding of editing concepts and storytelling tools. Then they will use that creative knowledge and apply it practically through a series of video editing assignments.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Learning Objectives/Outcomes
By the end of the semester:

  • Students will develop proficiency in Adobe Premiere Pro software.
  • Students will learn how to create meaning and story through the juxtaposition of sounds and images.
  • Students will gain a basic understanding of different editing styles and how these styles can be used to influence story.
  • Using film language, students will learn to analyze the video editing styles of existing films and to identify what these creative choices can reveal about a character or world.
  • Students will gain an understanding of the ways in which editing styles have changed in conjunction with editorial software advancements and other new filmmaking technologies.
  • Students will gain a basic understanding of the post production process and the importance of organization and project management.

Required and Recommended Course Materials

Required Reading: Adobe Premiere Pro CC: Classroom In a Book by Maxim Jago / Adobe Creative Team (2021 Version)

(Official training workbook from Adobe Systems)

This book contains footage that will be used to edit throughout the class. It is required that students buy this book and use the footage that is provided with it as a source for the assignments. The printed version of the book comes with a Data DvD inside the back cover that contains the editing work files. If you have a DvD drive on your computer, this is the easiest way to install the footage. The book is also available in a Kindle/ e-Book edition. If you buy the digital version you will need to download the footage online. At the very beginning of the Kindle/ e-Book version there is a page that begins “How to Get Your Lesson Files.” On that page you will find a link and instructions to set up an account and download the files from the Peachpit website. (These downloadable files are also available if you buy the printed book but don't have access to a DvD drive.) Because Adobe is continually making changes and adding features to Premiere Pro CC and to their other programs, I recommend getting the current version of the textbook as well as staying up to date with Premiere Pro CC software program updates.

Note: Because Adobe normally releases major updates to its Creative Cloud Suite of applications twice a year the textbook is often playing catch-up. But this means that if you wish to use an older version of the textbook it may not fully cover newly introduced features. New versions of the textbook are normally released in late February or early March - which means that they are pretty much up-to-date when used in the Fall Semester, but normally released too late for the most recent versions to be used for the Spring Semester. I realize that students may sometimes purchase (or be handed down) older versions of the textbook. If you are using an older version, please be aware that the chapter numbering system changes in different releases -- so pay attention to the topic descriptions to make sure you are reading the appropriate chapters.

Students will also be required to read selected chapters and articles that will be posted online as part of the week's assignments.

Required Computer Software and Hardware:

  • Quizzes will be proctored electronically using Respondus Lock-Down Browser software, which is included with the course. Quizzes must be taken on PC or Mac computers - no phones, tablets or Chromebooks allowed. You will also need to have a functioning webcam camera and microphone on your computer.
  • For this course students will be required to edit on a computer (PC or Mac) with the Adobe Premiere software installed. We will be using the CC version of the software. For computer requirements to run the software, you may view this page: https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/system-requirements.html (Links to an external site.)

Please take these minimum hardware requirements seriously. A slow computer that does not meet the requirements and crashes repeatedly is not an excuse for late or missing assignments!

  • A 3-button mouse with scroll wheel, although not required, is highly recommended and will provide an easier and more efficient interface for working with the software.
  • A fast (Thunderbolt or USB3) external hard drive (or SSD drive) is also highly recommended.

Rutgers currently has a licensing arrangement with Adobe that allows students to use the Premiere Pro software as well as the rest of the Creative Cloud software programs for free. To obtain the software you will need to visit https://it.rutgers.edu/adobe/ (Links to an external site.) and follow the instructions for accessing the Creative Cloud and downloading the software you'll need.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Type of Assessments:

  • Quizzes (2) 75 points each / 30% total
  • Essay (1) 50 points / 10% total
  • Editing Projects (4) 240 points total / 48% total
  • Discussion forums participation (12) 5 points each / 12% total

Instructor: Dave Sperling, dhs78@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:211:201 Principles of Cinematography Online

Principles of Cinematography Online

Course Number: 07:211:201
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course provides an introduction to the art of cinematography. By analyzing selected film clips and reading interviews with the cinematographers who created them, students learn about the process of creating these compelling visuals. Students are also introduced to the language and technical basics that are the cinematographer’s everyday tools and will discover how motion picture photography has transitioned over time, embracing the latest technological developments and adjusting to the changing media sophistication of the viewing audience. The course emphasizes how the aesthetic choices of cinematography bring life to visual storytelling.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The course will focus primarily on the artistic and practical aspects of cinematography, emphasizing the creative decisions made as part of the cinematographic process. Special attention will be given to the way the cinematography of a project affects the viewer’s perception of the story.

Students will learn:

  • The differences between our visual perception and the way the camera captures it -- and how the cinematographer provides the bridge between the two.
  • How choices made in frame selection, composition, movement and lighting effect the viewer’s perception of the story being told.
  • How different cinematographers bring their own vision to similar subject matter, producing varied looks and producing different emotional responses.
  • How cinematography has transformed over time by adapting to both technical advancements and changing audiences.
  • The relationships and collaboration between cinematographer and other major creative forces (director, production designer, special effects & editor) on a film.
  • Students will be introduced to and work with a number of online resources and software tools as they learn about the creative process that goes into cinematography. In doing so, they will employ current technologies to access information, conduct research and report findings.
  • Students will also be introduced in a non-technical way to the basic features of cameras and lighting that are utilized as part of the cinematographer’s art, as well as the language of film and video production.
  • As part of the learning process, students will perform exercises to improve their ability to understand cameras and lighting; and will learn to create their own storyboards to help them design compelling ways to tell visual stories. Many of the assignments are designed to hone their problem solving abilities and technical skill set while allowing them to make personal choices and express their creativity.

Required and Recommended Course Materials

Required Reading:

  • Masters of Light: Conversations With Contemporary Cinematographers by Dennis Schaefer and Larry Salvato (University of California Press) (also available for Kindle)
  • Students will also be required to read selected articles from American Cinematographer Magazine and from ICG (International Cinematographer’s Guild) Magazine.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Type of Assessments:

  • Quizzes (2) 54 points each/ 18% total
  • Final Exam (1) 84 points / 14% total
  • Film Scene Analysis Essay (1) 84 points / 14% total
  • Final Paper (1) 108 points / 18% total
  • Homework Projects 108 points total / 18% total
  • Blog Entries (3) 12 points each / 6% total
  • Discussion forums participation (12) 6 points per unit / 12% total

Instructor: Dave Sperling, dhs78@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:211:240 The Art of Documentary Filmmaking Online

The Art of Documentary Filmmaking Online

Course Number: 07:211:240
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

What are the key tools and techniques you need to know to create engaging and ethical documentary films? In this intensive introduction to the practice of documentary filmmaking, we will explore the cinematic language, aesthetic conventions, and ethical considerations of documentary while learning to use contemporary filmmaking tools to create our own work. To develop our skills as documentary film artists, we will examine and compare key approaches from a number of documentary film frameworks, including: propaganda; social advocacy and investigative film; Direct Cinema; cinéma vérité; found footage filmmaking; essay and diary film; the personal documentary; ethnographic film; and the experiments of avant-garde non-fiction. We will explore the documentary film production process, from proposal to fine cut, and will learn to use the frameworks surveyed to craft documentary sounds and images, culminating in our own short films.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Dziga Vertov claimed that film creates a fresh perspective of the world, one known only to the filmmaker but revealed to the audience through the film. Students in this course will learn to craft perspectives of the world using documentary sounds and images. Students will complete technical exercises and will learn to apply tools and techniques gleaned from other documentary film artists to the development of their own projects. This course will provide a foundation in documentary filmmaking and ethics, an understanding of the evolution of documentary film form, and exposure to the documentary production process, including: proposal and treatment writing; recording sounds and images; and editing a rough and fine cut. Students will also learn to assess classmate work and offer constructive feedback.

Course Objectives: Students will demonstrate their understanding of documentary techniques through short film exercises and a final documentary film project. Students will evidence their understanding of the documentary production and proposal process by developing a proposal, artist statement, treatment, filmography, and one-sheet for their final project. Students will also learn to engage in constructive feedback of peer work through written evaluations of peer proposals, artist statements, treatments, and rough cuts. Through exposure to key documentary films and debates, students will learn to identify and evaluate various formal and ethical approaches to making documentary works. Students will participate in regular discussions, offering written responses to illustrate their understanding of key technical, stylistic, social, and ethical ideas.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Execute and master technical and stylistic strategies key to producing a documentary film.
  • Learn tools and strategies for producing and proposing a documentary film.
  • Critically evaluate peer works and offer constructive feedback.
  • Grasp distinctions between various technical and stylistic approaches to documentary film art.
  • Identify and discuss the social and ethical implications of making documentary work.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Course Materials: Students will be required to purchase two course texts and must have access to a computer and high-speed internet. Students will also need access to a camera, sound recorder, and editing software.
  • Required Texts
    • Introduction to Documentary, 3rd ed., by Bill Nichols (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2017).
    • Directing the Documentary, 6th ed., by Michael Rabiger (Burlington, MA: Tayler & Francis, 2015).
    • Students will be required to read a number of additional articles exploring the practice of documentary film art. All reading assignments, including required text chapters, are listed in the course schedule. Readings not included in the required course texts listed above will be made available as pdf’s on CANVAS.
  • Required Films
    • Each week, students will be required to view and respond to a number of short and feature-length films. All film viewing assignments are listed in the course schedule. Assigned films will be made available on CANVAS whenever possible. However, there may be instances when an assigned film must be rented from a streaming service such as Amazon or Kanopy. Additional film clips will be integrated into weekly lectures.
  • Required Tech
    • Students must have access to a video camera, sound recording device, and video and audio editing software to complete the required film exercises and short documentary film for this course. A subscription to LinkedIn Learning is also required to complete a number of the technical tutorials. To access your LinkedIn Learning subscription as a Rutgers student, please visit: https://it.rutgers.edu/linkedin-learning/knowledgebase/logging-into-linkedin-learning/

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

This is an intensive introduction to the art and practice of documentary filmmaking. Students will be required to complete a 3-5 minute documentary film in addition to the regular weekly assignments listed in the course schedule (due each week on Tuesday and Friday). Course assignments will include: lectures; readings; film viewings; discussion board posts; technical tutorials; and four short filmmaking exercises.

Students will be responsible for the following assignments:

  • Discussion board posts (12) - Students will post regular 250-word responses to the CANVAS discussion board. Responses in part I of the course will apply ideas from lecture materials and readings to the assigned films. Responses in parts 2 and 3 of the course will offer constructive feedback on classmates’ work, including the proposal, artist statement, treatment, and rough cut. Responses will be threaded, and students will be expected to read and respond to the overall discussion. A total of 12 responses will be due throughout the semester. Deadlines are listed in the course schedule.
  • Film exercises (4) - Students will complete four short film exercises (1-2 minutes each) exploring technical and stylistic approaches to documentary sound and image. These will include: shooting an image-only scene; recording an audio-only interview; editing found footage; and writing and recording voice-over.
  • Final project proposal - Students will draft a 500-word (approximately one-page) proposal for a final 3-5 minute documentary film.
  • Final project artist statement - Students will write a 500-word (approximately one-page) artist statement discussing their stylistic, technical, and ethical approach to the final project.
  • Final project treatment - Students will write a 750-1000 word (approximately two-page) treatment for the final project.
  • Final project filmography - Students will create an annotated filmography of 4-5 films, describing how each film influences their stylistic, technical, or ethical approach to the final project.
  • Final project one-sheet - Students will create a one-sheet for the final project to include: a tagline; a short film description; 1 or 2 stills from the film; and an artist bio that includes an ethical statement or code.
  • Final film - Students will complete a final 3-5 minute documentary film. Students will be expected to finish a rough cut of the final project and to integrate feedback into the fine cut.

Course Grading
Grading is based on the assignments:

  • Discussion board posts-24%
  • Film exercises-20%
  • Proposal-5%
  • Artist statement-5%
  • Treatment 10%
  • Filmography-5%
  • One-sheet-5%
  • Final film-25%.

Instructor: Jennifer Heuson, jen.heuson@rutgers.edu

07:211:250 Creating Movie VFX: History and Techniques Online

Creating Movie VFX: History and Techniques Online

Course Number: 07:211:250
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Special visual effects are increasingly found in films of all types, and understanding their full potential unlocks a world of creative options for filmmakers. Visual effects can not only add excitement and produce amazing new realities, but are often seamlessly integrated with traditional visuals to enhance completely real-looking scenes. This course examines the 100-plus-year history of the role of movie special effects in creating visual stories, paying particular attention to their role in visual problem-solving, while also providing a hands-on introduction to two of the primary visual effect software programs for contemporary films — BlackMagicDesign Resolve/Fusion and Adobe After Effects.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Objectives: In this course, students will develop an understanding of visual effects in filmmaking and learn how to proficiently use industry standard software to create visual effects composites. Students will trace the historical development of visual effects techniques from early 1900’s to the present day through select readings and viewing of film clips. They will develop an understanding of filmmaking and visual effects terminology and use it to analyze, describe and differentiate the technical concepts required for a wide range of special effects and workflow scenarios. Students will learn to evaluate various special effects crafts to determine why specific methodologies or combinations may be appropriate for a particular task, and how these choices can impact the overall production budget and completion schedule. Students will also develop proficiency in industry-standard BlackMagicDesign Resolve/Fusion and Adobe After Effects software programs, and learn how these can be used to both create designed effects compositions and to remedy problems that may appear in production footage.

Learning Outcomes
After participating in this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the historical development of visual effect techniques in filmmaking from its origins to present day and how these techniques are linked to technologies available during the historical period when they were created.
  • Use appropriate terminology when analyzing, describing and differentiating the various technical components of visual effects.
  • Analyze technical concepts of special effects, how each is performed, and why specific one(s) may be appropriate for a particular scene, along with their impact on the production budget and completion schedule.
  • Proficiently use BlackMagicDesign Resolve/Fusion and Adobe After Effects software to manipulate video footage and create special effects composites.
  • Analyze and propose appropriate postproduction fixes for technical issues in production footage using BlackMagicDesign Resolve/Fusion or Adobe After Effects visual effects workflows.

Required and Recommended Course Materials

  • The Filmmaker’s Guide to Visual Effects by Eran Dinur (Focal Press)
  • Resolve/Fusion from BlackMagicDesign – Free. Resolve/Fusion offers a free version with most of the capabilities of their full studio version. The course will provide practical source footage and assignments that will interface properly with the free version, so there is no requirement to purchase the full studio version.
  • Adobe AfterEffects – (License) -- Rutgers currently has a licensing arrangement in place with Adobe that allows students to use the Adobe Creative Cloud software programs at no cost. To obtain the software you will need to visit https://it.rutgers.edu/adobe/ (Links to an external site.) and follow the instructions for accessing the Creative Cloud and downloading the software you'll need.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Homework Assignment Projects

  • Project # 1 -- Creating basic photographic image combination effects in the style of the early 20th century using glass or a mirror
  • Project # 2 – Scale and Perspective: Creating multiple versions of a physical cut-out forced perspective photo-realistic collage
  • Project # 3 – Changing mood and emotion by creating a color correction sequence in DaVinci Resolve
  • Project # 4 -- Compositing and outputting with both After Effects and Resolve/ Fusion
  • Project # 5 -- Create and adjust green screen composites in both After Effects and Resolve/ Fusion
  • Project # 6 -- Compositing with variable keyframes (garbage) masks
  • Project # 7 -- Isolating and modifying a specific color in a scene
  • Project # 8 -- Adding text and matching movement & perspective to a moving background
  • Project # 9 – Identifying and replacing problem areas of a shot
  • Project # 10 – Cloning/ replacing areas in motion footage

Essay 1: Historical Perspectives

  • Select a basic visual effect sequence from a modern film (no more than 10 years old). In choosing your visual effects sequence, make sure that It is something that could have been orchestrated using technologies available in the past as well as ones currently available. Research and analyze all the elements that would have gone into creating the effects sequence as seen. Include a reference link to the effect sequence.
  • Re-think the same effect to analyze how it would have been created during two periods in the past – during the 1970’s (40-50 years ago) and during the 1920’s (90-100 years ago.) Be sure that the techniques you are suggesting for each period were available at that time!
  • Finally, describe how the finished effects would be different from each other, and how the resulting differences would affect the storytelling.

Essay 2: Analyzing the Creation of a Complex Effects Sequence

  • Select a complex visual effect sequence from a recent film (no more than 6 years old). Explain why effects were needed for the sequence and how the effects helped tell the story visually. Include specifics about what aspects of the VFX worked best, and any that fell short or got in the way of the story telling.
  • Analyze in detail all the different elements that may have gone into creating the effect, what techniques may have been used, and what personnel, facilities, interactive lighting and software may have been needed.

Final Project: Creating and Compositing a Complex Visual Effect

  • This final project is used to demonstrate your problem-solving skills and capabilities in BlackMagicDesign Resolve/Fusion and/or Adobe After Effects!
  • Students may use their own or course-provided 4k, UHD or HD raw footage and compositing elements to create and composite a complex visual effect. (Complex means an effect that includes numerous elements and requires a combination of multiple technologies to accomplish.)
  • Project proposals should be submitted to the instructor in advance of undertaking the project.
    In addition to creating and posting the final composition, students must write a complete analysis of their process, including details to provide insight into not just the problems being solved and techniques used, but also what did or did not work for them -- essentially creating a diary of the creative journey.

Quizzes

  • Quiz # 1: This quiz will cover content from units 1-4
  • Quiz # 2: This quiz will cover content from units 5-8
  • Quiz # 3: This quiz will cover content from units 9-12

Course Grading: Final Grade Calculation, Assignment Type, Points/Percentage

  • Class Forums (Discussion Boards)
    • One (1) question per each unit for Units #1 - #12 12 % (1% per unit)
  • Quizzes
    • Three (3) Quizzes 21 % (7% per quiz)
  • Essay 1: Historical Perspectives 11 %
  • Essay 2: Analyzing the Creation of a Complex Effects Sequence 12 %
  • Homework Assignments
    • Ten (10) practical homework exercises, primarily emphasizing specific features of Resolve/ Fusion and After Effects 30 % (3% per assignment)
  • Final Project:
      • Creating and Compositing a Complex Visual Effect 14 %
  • TOTAL 100 %

Instructor: Dave Sperling, dhs78@mgsa.rutgers.edu

Interdisciplinary Courses

07:557:201 Practical Finance for Entrepreneurial Creatives Online

Practical Finance for Entrepreneurial Creatives Online

Course Number: 07:557:201
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

The course teaches personal and entrepreneurial financial management concepts. It is designed for nonbusiness majors who have already commenced or are contemplating single- and multi-person ventures. Personal financial management topics include goal setting and prioritization; cash management; budgeting; acquiring, managing, and protecting credit in its varying forms; saving and investing; planning for major purchases; evaluating alternative insurance products; and strategies for overcoming financial adversity.

Entrepreneurial financial management topics include understanding the risks and responsibilities that are associated with that undertaking; devising business, strategic and operating plans and budgets; selecting legal, financial, managerial, and promotional advisory firms; choosing an appropriate legal structure for the enterprise; managing financial performance and assessing progress; managing various forms of risk; protecting intellectual property; managing freelance activity; strategies for borrowing money and soliciting investments; overcoming financial adversity; and organizing sales and transfers of business interests.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Learning Objectives/Outcomes
Upon completion of the personal financial management section of the course, students should be able to:

  • Construct and manage a personal budget that takes into account their short- and long-term financial goals and objectives
  • Understand proper cash management techniques, manage payroll tax withholdings and file tax returns
  • Understand the importance of saving and investing in the achievement of their personal goals and objectives
  • Plan for major purchases and higher education costs
  • Choose between, manage, and protect consumer-credit alternatives including credit cards, auto loans and leases, student loans and mortgages
  • Understand how insurance works and the types of coverage that are appropriate for their circumstances
  • Weigh the financial, economic and other impacts of the different career choices they may be contemplating
  • Problem-solve their way through day-to-day and moderately complicated situations involving personal financial management and crises

Upon completion of the entrepreneurial financial management section of the course, students should be able to:

  • Assess a venture’s feasibility and their ability to undertake its development and management
  • Construct business, strategic and operating plans to properly guide the enterprise
  • Prudently source legal, financial and managerial representation, and select the appropriate legal structure for the ventures they have in mind
  • Fundamentally understand best financial management practices as they pertain to a commercial venture, and how to arrange for debt and equity financing, when/if needed
  • Fundamentally understand the business-borrowing alternatives, pricing and transaction-structuring considerations
  • Address financial adversity in terms of self-directed remediation, negotiated requests for assistance and, when all else fails, filing for bankruptcy
  • Fundamentally understand the different types of mergers and acquisitions, and other so-called exit strategies including transfers and sales

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Textbook Practical Finance: A Straightforward Guide to Personal and Entrepreneurial Finance by Mitchell D. Weiss. Digital copy provided with course.

Instructors: Mitchell D. Weiss, mw779@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Peggy Reed, pr432@mgsa.rutgers.edu

Music Courses

07:700:101 Intro to Music I

Intro to Music I

Course Number: 07:700:101

For students with little or no background in music. Basic concepts for intelligent listening to all kinds of music. Emphasis on aspects of sonority, rhythm, melody, harmony, and structure.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

07:700:102 Intro to Music History

Intro to Music History

Course Number: 07:700:102

Introductory historical survey of styles, genres, forms, and composers in music from antiquity to the present.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:101 or 103 or equivalent

07:700:103 Introduction to Music Theory

Introduction to Music Theory

Course Number: 07:700:103

Rudiments of music: intervals, scales, key signatures, modes, chords, rhythm, and meter. Development of aural skills.

No previous musical experience required. Intended for nonmajors.

3 credit(s)

07:700:104 Intro to Music Analysis

Intro to Music Analysis

Course Number: 07:700:104

Exploration of basic analytical techniques that reveal principles of musical structure; examples drawn from the medieval period through the 20th century; introduction to various types of music notation and score reading; further development of aural skills.

Intended for non-majors.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:103 or equivalent

07:700:105 Making Music With Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio

Making Music With Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio

Course Number: 07:700:105
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Making Music with Computers is an introduction to computer music technology with a focus on creative composition projects. This course is designed to deepen your creative and critical approach to music composition while building a solid foundation for working with digital audio. We will integrate studies in electronic music theory and history, digital signal processing (DSP), performance practice, and aesthetics.

Topics include acoustics, principles of classic synthesis, sound design for video, basic mixing, and an introduction to MIDI. You will gain hands-on experience in soundfile editing, DSP techniques, and working with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). Primary software tools include Audacity and Cubase Elements.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Develop a compositional practice with a focus on creativity and experimentation. We will regularly workshop projects for peer and instructor feedback through the discussion forum.
  • Engage concepts from electronic music history, repertoire, and current trends through listening and analysis. We will also examine the compositional processes of seasoned composers.
  • Develop useful techniques for recording, modifying, and mixing sound through diverse software tools. We will practice these skills through technical and creative exercises.
  • Sharpen listening skills and broaden aural perspective through analysis and discussion of a variety of electronic music examples.
  • Think independently about music, articulate your thoughts, and a have a heightened awareness of how technical and musical elements function together in electronic music.
  • Build a portfolio of original compositions and gain practice presenting and discussing your work in a public forum.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Cubase Elements Software

Instructor: Gregg Rossetti, gjr63@rutgers.edu

07:700:131 Introduction to Music Online

Introduction to Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:131
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is divided into three sections. The first covers the fundamentals of music, including sound production, common instruments, the basics of music notation, basic musical materials such as scales and chords, and examines the variety of musical textures. The second section focuses on the way that these materials can be organized including form. The last section focuses on music of other cultures and on ways in which music is used around us, for example, in film and TV, advertisement, cartoons, and in shaping our beliefs. Despite the emphasis on organization and style, there is also a historical component to help the student understand the context of the music he hears and the reasons for change. The course is not limited to classical music, but includes popular styles among the examples. The course is media rich and contains some interactive features.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

  • Develop general scholastic skills such as critical thinking, reading, writing, and listening
  • Develop the ability to articulately express opinions in writing, with an emphasis on clarity, persuasion, coherence, and the incorporation of relevant outside sources
  • Develop strong organizational and study skills
  • Consider the cultural and social significance of music in selected historical and geographic cultures
  • Consider specific aspects of both notated and non-notated musical traditions by engaging with outside fields of history, anthropology, and philosophy
  • Develop a basic knowledge of music notation, fundamentals of music theory, and musical instruments
  • Develop familiarity with some representative composers, musicians, and musical works from selected traditions
  • Distinguish significant style features of various historical periods of Western classical music and selected modern musics

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Analyze musical language and discuss features of the music;
  • Relate music to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies;
  • Develop opinions on musical issues and express these with clarity and accuracy.

CORE Curriculum Learning Goals met by this course: Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies (AHp).

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading is based on small homework assignments (25%), two papers (25%), participation in discussion boards (10%), and two exams (40%).

Instructors: Solomon Guhl-Miller, sguhl1@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Myjunglin Oh, mo441@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Rachel Lansang, rlb239@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Jaclyn Moldawsky, jmm992@rutgers.edu

07:700:133 Introduction to Music Theory Online

Intended for students with little or no musical background. As a result, no previous musical experience is required. This course covers the rudiments of music, including pitch, duration, scales, keys, intervals, meter, rhythm and other related areas.

This course may be used to satisfy the theory requirement for the music minor.

3 credits

Note: Students will not receive credit for both Introduction to 07:700:133 and 07:700:103. Students who have successfully completed 121, 122, 221, or 222 may not take this course. SAS Core Code: Critical Creative Expression (AHr)

07:700:134 Introduction to Music Theory Online Short Course

This is a compressed, 2-credit course.

This course is intended for students with little or no musical background. As a result, no previous musical experience is required. This course covers the rudiments of music, including pitch, duration, scales, keys, intervals, meter, rhythm and other related areas.

This course may be used to satisfy the theory requirement for the music minor.

2 Credits

Note: Students may receive credit for only one of the following: 07:700:134, 07:700:133 and 07:700:103.

07:700:135 Making Music with Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio Online

Making Music with Computers: Introduction to Digital Audio Online

Course Number: 07:700:135
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is an introduction to computer music technology with a focus on creative composition projects. This course is designed to deepen your creative and critical approach to music composition while building a solid foundation for working with digital audio. Topics include acoustics, sound design for video, basic mixing, and an introduction to MIDI. You will gain hands-on experience in sound file editing, DSP techniques, and working with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW).

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Compose original music using computer music technology by integrating digital audio techniques with the ability to intelligently analyze, interpret, and describe electronic music.
  • Demonstrate development of a personal compositional style with a focus on creativity and experimentation. We will complete digital audio assignments and well-crafted compositions while regularly workshop projects for peer and instructor feedback in the Listening Room modules.
  • Apply digital audio techniques for modifying and mixing sound using diverse software tools. We will develop these skills through completion of technique-focused software exercises.
  • Integrate concepts from electronic music history, repertoire, and current trends through assignments that sharpen listening skills and broaden aural perspective. We will analyze, interpret, and describe musical materials in a wide variety of classic and contemporary electronic music examples.
  • Articulate independent thinking about music and explain how technical and musical elements work together in electronic music.
  • Apply music industry experience by using online distribution channels (YouTube) to present your original work.
  • Build a portfolio of original compositions and effectively present and discuss your work in a public forum.
  • Identify yourself as a developing artist and recognize responsibilities of artists in our society by participating in the creative process and engaging in dialogue with the artistic community created by students in the course.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: There is no textbook for the course, but you will need the following materials:

  • Purchase Cubase Elements 11 (Links to an external site.) for the educational price of $66.99 (download version).Please note that it may take several days to verify your ID and complete the order, so plan ahead.
  • A purchased, licensed version of Cubase Elements is required for the course. You will be asked to demonstrate that you own a license to Cubase Elements 10. The instructor is not able to provide assistance on unlicensed copies of the software.
  • Install the following free software: Audacity: http://audacityteam.org/ (Links to an external site.)
  • A pair of headphones to plug into your computer or audio interface
  • An external hard drive or jump drive to which to back up your work. Storage space of 32GB is recommended.

The MUS 135 course contains online units and lessons with supplementary audio and video, software lessons, technical drills, composition assignment, and a listening response activity. Homework assignments and quizzes take place online. We share will share our creative projects online and discuss using the discussion modules. Interaction with professor Hsu occurs through email.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

We will complete a variety of assignments and projects outlined below. Please refer to each assignment for submission guidelines.

Type Points/Percentage

  • Quality of Participation and Peer Feedback in Listening Rooms 10%
  • Assignments 20%
  • "Studio Time" Projects 25%
  • Quizzes 20%
  • Final Project (YouTube Comments 2% Project 23%) 25%
  • TOTAL100%

Instructor: Aurie Hsu, ahsu@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:230 Theater Appreciation Online

Students attend a wide spectrum of theater offerings including Broadway, off-Broadway, off-off-Broadway, regional, educational, and community events, and, through viewing those theatrical productions and online lectures, gain an appreciation of performance and everything that goes into producing theater.

3 Credits

Note: Students will not receive credit for both 07:965:230 and 07:965:211. This course does not fulfill any SAS core requirements.

07:700:233 American Popular Song Online

American Popular Song Online

Course Number: 07:700:233
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

An overview of American popular song from the arrival of the earliest Europeans through the 1970s. It examines the melding of European and African musical cultures in the 19th century to create a true American style, then traces the various styles and genres that evolved from the 19th century and those who created them.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Identify musical styles and genres in American music between the American Revolution and the 1970s according to their musical features using the basic technical terminology and pattern-types of musical organization, including elements of harmony, scale, meter, orchestration, and form
  • Recognize and identify the ways in which American popular music of the past 50 years employs the musical elements and genres of American music written between the Revolution and 1970
  • Demonstrate an ability to listen critically to a wide range of culturally diverse musical styles and practices of the present day and the historical past.
  • Distinguish different kinds of musical form and practice as reflections of class, culture, and social interaction among performers and listeners.
  • Recognize how social, political, religious, and cultural needs shaped American music in a process of historical evolution.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

There are a total of 500 points in this course. Extra points may be earned by participating in the forum (maximum 30) and an optional Concert Report (Blog) (maximum 15)

  • Exams (4): 100 points each/20% each
  • Semester Presentation (1):100 points/20%
  • Discussion Forums: up to 30 extra points (.4 maximum points per post)
  • Optional Concert Blog: up to 15 extra points

Instructor: Solomon Guhl-Miller, sguhl1@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:234 From Jazz to Hip Hop: African American Music in the 20th Century Online

From Jazz to Hip Hop: African American Music in the 20th Century Online

Course Number: 07:700:234
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

From Jazz to Hip Hop is designed as an exploration of the relationships between jazz and other African American musical traditions from early 1900s to the present, including blues, R&B, rock, soul and hip hop. The course focuses on the development, evolution, influence and issues of jazz music in America, an exploration that starts with the ephemeral roots of popular African American music in the folk and religious music of the 1800s.

Special attention will be paid to the roles jazz and jazz musicians have played in black popular music and the means by which jazz has helped inform the development of popular American musical styles.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Goals:

  • To understand the historical development of a wide array of African American popular music making traditions and evaluate the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of these 20th century musical genres.
  • To develop active/critical listening skills in order to classify sound recordings relevant to the course materials by (sub)genre and likely provenance while making inferences as to the work’s social function and cultural significance.

Course Objectives:

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which African American popular music (broadly defined) developed and evaluate how such extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of the genre.
  • Analyze jazz, blues, R&B, soul, hip-hop and related recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and likely historical period.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

List and describe each assignment below.

  • Song Presentation Assignment - Two-three paragraph personal reflection about a course-related song of your choosing. This project doubles as an introduction to uploading media in the Canvas Learning Management System
  • Artist Profile Project - An online artist profile of the course-related artist of your choice. The project includes a researched historical overview/critique of a musician/group and a song/album analysis.
  • Two Exams - held at the conclusion of units 5 & 9
  • Discussion Forum Posts - Contribute to required discussion forums in units 2-7 and 9.

Final Grade Calculation

  • 50 points / 9.1% Song Presentation
  • 150 points / 27.3% Artist Profile
  • 100 points / 18.2% Exam 1
  • 100 points / 18.2% Exam 2
  • 150 points / 27.3% Discussion Forums
  • 550 points / 100%TOTAL

Instructor: Sean Lorre, sjlorre@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:235 Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online

Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online

Course Number: 07:700:235
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

How does a musical genre such as rock become a cultural force bringing about social, sartorial, and political change? How does our sense of identity—race, gender, class, etc.—influence the music we listen to? What roles do technology and commerce play in shaping local and global ideas of popular music? In short, how and why did rock ‘n’ roll transform the world?

This class broadly explores the history of rock music from a wide array of perspectives, covering the period from its early beginnings to rockabilly, soul, metal, punk, and many other subgenres throughout the second half of the 20th century.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goals:

  • To understand the historical development of rock 'n' roll and evaluate the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of one of the most popular and influential musical genres of the twentieth century.
  • To develop active/critical listening skills in order to classify rock and pre-rock recordings by (sub)genre and likely provenance while making inferences as to the work’s social function and cultural significance.

Course Objectives:
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which rock 'n' roll (broadly defined) developed and evaluate how such extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of the genre.
  • Analyze pre-rock, rock 'n' roll and related recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and likely historical period.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments

  • Song Presentation Assignment - Two-three paragraph personal reflection about a rock-related song of your choosing. This project doubles as an introduction to uploading media in the Canvas Learning Management System
  • Artist Profile Project - An online artist profile of the rock or rock-related artist of your choice. The project includes a researched historical overview/critique of a musician/group and a song/album analysis.
  • Two Exams - held at the conclusion of units 4 and 8
  • Discussion Forum Posts - Contribute to required discussion forums in units 2–8.

Course Grading
Grading is based on the assignments

  • Song Presentation - 30 pts
  • Artist Profile - 150 pts
  • Exam 1 - 100 pts
  • Exam 2 - 100 pts
  • Discussion Forums - 170 pts

Instructor: Sean Lorre, sjlorre@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:238 Studies in Major Composers

Studies in Major Composers

Course Number: 07:700:238

07:700:239 Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online Short Course

Rock ‘N’ Roll: Origins to Present Online Short Course

Course Number: 07:700:239
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a compressed, 2-credit course.

How does a musical genre such as rock become a cultural force bringing about social, sartorial, and political change? How does our sense of identity—race, gender, class, etc.—influence the music we listen to? What roles do technology and commerce play in shaping local and global ideas of popular music? In short, how and why did rock ‘n’ roll transform the world?

This class broadly explores the history of rock music from a wide array of perspectives, covering the period from its early beginnings to rockabilly, soul, metal, punk, and many other subgenres throughout the second half of the 20th century.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goals:

  • To understand the historical development of rock 'n' roll and evaluate the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of one of the most popular and influential musical genres of the twentieth century.
  • To develop active/critical listening skills in order to classify rock and pre-rock recordings by (sub)genre and likely provenance while making inferences as to the work’s social function and cultural significance.

Course Objectives:
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which rock 'n' roll (broadly defined) developed and evaluate how such extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of the genre.
analyze pre-rock, rock 'n' roll and related recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and likely historical period.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
List and describe each assignment below.

  • Song Presentation Assignment - Two-three paragraph personal reflection about a rock-related song of your choosing. This project doubles as an introduction to uploading media in the Canvas Learning Management System
  • Artist Profile Project - An online artist profile of the rock or rock-related artist of your choice. The project includes a researched historical overview/critique of a musician/group and a song/album analysis.
  • Two Exams - held at the conclusion of units 3 and 6
    Discussion Forum Posts - Contribute to required discussion forums in units 2–5.

Course Grading
Grading is based on the assignments

  • Song Presentation - 50 pts
  • Artist Profile - 150 pts
  • Exam 1 - 100 pts
  • Exam 2 - 100 pts
  • Discussion Forums - 160 pts

Instructor: Sameer Anjur Ramchandran, sar328@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Farley Miller, fm351@rutgers.edu

07:700:241 Studies in World Music Online

Studies in World Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:241
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Studies in World Music focuses on introducing and surveying the music of diverse societies and cultures of the world using social and cultural theories and ethnomusicological methodologies as a framework. Throughout this course, students will explore the idea of “world music” in various social, cultural, and aesthetic contexts. To understand music as culture in the modern world, we must examine music in its various social functions and roles, as well as its theoretical components. The goal of this course is to cultivate an informed, critical, and sensitive understanding of music in the modern world. The purpose of this course is to serve as an introduction to and survey of the music of various societies throughout the world.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The goal of this course is to cultivate an informed, critical, and sensitive understanding of music in the modern world.

Course Objectives: In this course, the primary aspects of music will be discussed including: the contexts and occasions for music making; the social organization and functions of music, and; the oral, written, and mass mediated transmissions of music in the modern world. Fundamental aspects of sound—including pitch, phonic structure, rhythm and meter, texture, form, and expression—are identified and explained. Specific case studies are chosen in order to illustrate a wide range of musical expressions and related social issues. Knowledge will be acquired through the utilization of recordings, videos, readings and live performances.

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course students will have demonstrated that they:

  • Can use the appropriate musical/ethnomusicological terminology when analyzing and describing a variety of musics within social and cultural contexts.
  • Explain how music is characteristic of the people who make it, and how they use it in the modern world.
    understand the ways in which music is linked to sociocultural issues such as spirituality, politics, class, identity formation, and other theoretical constructs.

You do not have to be able to read music to understand the material in this course.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Assignments:

  • Discussion: Please Introduce Yourselves (5 points)
  • Acknowledgement of Course Policies (5 points)
  • Exam #1 (60 points)
  • Exam #2 (60 points)
  • Exam #3 (60 points)
  • Exam #4 (60 points)
  • Research Paper (90 points)
  • Discussion Post #1 (40 points)
  • Discussion Post #2 (40 points)
  • Discussion Post #3 (40 points)
  • Discussion Post #4 (40 points)
  • 500 points TOTAL

Instructor: Ruth M. "Sunni" Witmer, rw482@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:242 Country Music: A Cultural and Musical Survey Online

Country Music: A Cultural and Musical Survey Online

Course Number: 07:700:242
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Country music has been part of American popular culture for close to 100 years. From the fiddle tunes and blue yodels of the 1920s to the Americana revival and “hick-hop” of today, music associated with rural American life has fascinated and entertained. Moreover—despite its roots in obscure, rural Southern and Western folk song—country music has become one of the most commercially successful music styles of the past decade.

In this introductory-level elective course, students will cultivate critical thinking and analysis skills through the study of country music’s historical development. Following a detailed examination of the genre’s formation and popular trajectory over the course of the twentieth century, the course concludes with a thorough investigation of the cultural, social and musical implications of country music’s 21st-century resurgence.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Course Goals:

  • Students will gain an understanding of the historical development of country music.
  • Students will develop engaged listening skills in order to classify country music recordings by (sub)genre and provenance.
  • Students will develop an ability to think critically about the impact of social, political and cultural contexts on the production and reception of country music.

Course Objectives:
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Discuss the historical trajectory of country music from its origins to present-day trends.
  • Recognize the social, cultural and political conditions under which country music (broadly defined) developed.
  • Evaluate how extra-musical factors contributed to the production and reception of country music.
  • Analyze country music recordings, identifying general musical characteristics, genre-specific performance styles, and historical period.
  • Make inferences as to a country music recording’s likely social function and cultural significance based on elements of musical style.
  • Conduct basic online research from a select group of resources (Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum Digital Archive, Library of Congress Digital Archive, ProQuest Historical Newspapers Archive, America: History and Life, American Radio History Archive, etc.).
  • Create an online, multimedia presentation in the Canvas Learning Management System.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading is based on the assignments:

  • Song Presentation-10%
  • Artist Profile Online Presentation-24%
  • 3 Quizzes-36% (total)
  • Discussion Forums-30%

Final Grade Calculation (Points/Percentage Type)

  • 100 points / 10% Song Presentation Project
  • 200 points / 24% Artist Profile Online Presentation
  • 100 points / 10% Quiz 1 (units 1 & 2)
  • 100 points / 10% Quiz 2 (units 3 & 4)
  • 160 points / 16% Quiz 3 (units 5-7)
  • 240 points / 30% Discussion Forums (6 forums, 50 pts each)
  • 1000 points / 100% TOTAL

Instructor: Sean Lorre, sjlorre@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:243 Divas, Devils, and Drama: A History of Opera and Musical Theater Online

Divas, Devils, and Drama: A History of Opera and Musical Theater Online

Course Number: 07:700:243
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course is an introduction to the operatic genre from the 17th century to the present day. Tracing opera’s history from the musical intermezzi of Florence, Italy, to the innovative and experimental productions heard around the world today, this course explores how opera serves as a lens through which a variety of cultural, performative, and historical issues may be examined.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The aim of this course is to trace the development of the music drama in terms of its stylistic and compositional characteristics and goals, and to examine its ability to communicate meaning through music, text, and performance. The course will consider the historical context of various creators, performers, and listeners of opera and musical theater.

Course Objectives
The specific objectives to be achieved through this course are:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the historical circumstances surrounding the emergence and development of opera and musical theater.
  • Demonstrate understanding of major elements of operatic style, conventions, and compositional techniques as they have evolved over the course of 450 years.
  • Be prepared to view, understand, and contextualize performances.
  • Employ critical thinking skills in order to synthesize issues concerning operatic composition, performance, and reception within larger artistic, social, and political contexts.

Learning Outcomes
After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Utilize a common vocabulary for speaking and writing about opera, musical theater, and music-making more broadly.
  • Describe the trajectories of operatic style, major schools, and performance contexts.
  • Identify major composers and relevant musical works.
  • Evaluate operatic performances based on the goals, stylistic conventions, and content of various musical styles through the development of critical listening skills.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Grading

  • Written Assignments 30 points (3 at 10 points each)
  • Discussion Forum Participation 15 points
  • Midterm Exam 25 points
  • Final Exam 30 points
  • TOTAL 100 points

Instructor: Rachael Leigh Lansang, rlb239@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:244 Global Popular Music Online

Global Popular Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:244
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course will explore the popular music of various societies from around the world, and how it is created and transformed by cultural and musical influences from other societies and world views when they encounter and interact with one another. Students will examine the artistic, cultural, and socioeconomic effects of global popular music. Topics of inquiry include hybridity and diversity in music; the effects of globalization on musical/cultural development; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from expressive cultural forms expanding around the world, both historically and currently.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: To understand music as culture in the modern world, we must examine it in its various social functions and roles, as well as its theoretical components. The goal of this course is to cultivate an informed, critical, and sensitive understanding of global popular music and its roles and functions in the modern world.

Course Objectives
In this course, the primary aspects of popular music from all over the world are presented. Course objectives include:

  • Understanding musical/ethnomusicological terminology and using it to analyze and describe popular music within musical, social, and cultural contexts;
  • Analyzing the roles and functions of popular music within the social organization of societies, and the contexts and occasions for popular music making around the world;
  • Examining the oral, written, and mass mediated transmissions of popular music in a global environment.

Fundamental aspects of sound—including pitch, phonic structure, rhythm and meter, texture, form, and expression—are identified and explained. Specific case studies are chosen in order to illustrate a wide range of musical expressions and related social issues. Knowledge will be acquired through the utilization of recordings, videos, readings, and live performances.

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course students will have demonstrated that they can:

  • Use appropriate musical/ethnomusicological terminology when analyzing and describing popular music within musical, social, and cultural contexts;
  • Recognize and realize the roles and functions of popular music within the social organization of societies, and the contexts and occasions for popular music making around the world;
  • Understand the ways in which popular music is created and consumed through its oral, written, and mass mediated transmissions in a global environment.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments

  • Exam #1
  • Exam #2
  • Exam #3
  • Exam #4
  • Research Paper
  • Experiential Learning Event Project (Note: The Experiential Learning Event Project assignment will be suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.)
  • Online Discussion Post #1
  • Online Discussion Post #2
  • Online Discussion Post #3
  • Online Discussion Post #4

Instructor: Ruth M. "Sunni" Witmer, rw482@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:284 Digital Audio Composition

Digital Audio Composition

Course Number: 07:700:284
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Digital Audio Composition introduces students to the digital audio workstation, as well as basic concepts of computer music, sound, and electroacoustic composition. Students will develop compositional skills through their own creative projects as well as the study of a wide range of electronic/computer music.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:105 or 127 or 135
Learning Goals of Course

Upon completion of Digital Audio Composition, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic properties of sound
  • Demonstrate the ability to record, edit, process, mix and master digital audio and MIDI using a digital audio workstation
  • Demonstrate the ability to create and develop musical ideas using digital audio and MIDI sequencing techniques
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret electronic/computer-based music through writing

Instructor: Michael Zavorskas, mz407@rutgers.edu

07:700:290 Rock & Roll as a Cultural Phenomenon: Hist and Dev of Rock and Related Genres

Rock & Roll as a Cultural Phenomenon: Hist and Dev of Rock and Related Genres

Course Number: 07:700:290

Survey of the influence of rock and roll with a focus on the artists and music that reflected and influenced American society.

3 credit(s)

07:700:291 Jazz Appreciation

Jazz Appreciation

Course Number: 07:700:291

Survey of the relationships between jazz and other African-American musical traditions from the early 1900s to the present.

3 credit(s)

07:700:292 Musics of the World

Musics of the World

Course Number: 07:700:292

An introduction to the study of the intersection of music and culture as exhibited in diverse regions across the globe.

3 credit(s)

07:700:310 The Business of Music Online

The Business of Music Online

Course Number: 07:700:310
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course covers the fundamentals of the music industry from a variety of perspectives including major record labels and publishers, independent musicians and labels, managers, attorneys, and agents. Furthermore, students will gain entrepreneurial experience recording their own work and releasing/promoting it to the on-line community. There will also be some brief discussion about musician finances, job/internship acquisition/promotion, resume writing, and career building. This is the new online version of the former face-to-face class.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • To gain a broad understanding of music publishing including the departments of a major music publisher and how they interact with one another, copyright definitions/enforcement/filing criteria (including the rights granted when one creates a copyrightable work), and the various income types with a focus on mechanical licensing procedures including statutory rate and royalty calculations.
  • To learn how to register as both a writer and publisher with one of the major performing rights organizations (ASCAP or BMI) in order to be eligible to receive performance royalties for their musical works.
  • To gain a broad understanding of record company operations including the departments of a major record label and how they interact with one another, learn about the different types of recording contracts, and be able to generate royalty statements for artists, producers, and/or publishers.
  • To understand the way an artist’s personal team of advisors coordinates in order to enhance and further the artist’s career. We will discuss the responsibilities of the personal manager, business manager, attorneys, and agents.
  • To be able to write an effective artist’s biography as part of an overall marketing strategy as well as developing a web presence through traditional and social media.
  • To develop professional speaking and negotiation skills.
  • To learn how to release their own independent recording through available digital outlets and begin to develop a following from the ground up.
  • To be able to write an effective resume.

Course Objectives: Students will demonstrate through participation in class discussions, presentations, projects, and tests their growing business acumen and ability to complete tasks in a timely basis.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Final Grade Calculation:

  • 30% Homework Assignments & Participation
  • 10% Copyrights & Music Publishing Test
  • 15% Mid-Term Examination15%Final Examination (cumulative)
  • 30% Final Project, split into four pieces:
    • Completing your recording (25%)
    • Obtaining artwork for your project (25%)
    • Releasing your project to Spotify and other digital services through a 3rd party digital aggregator. This will cost you approximately $15. Please do not sign up for any so-called "premium" services. (25%)
    • Either:
      • Original work: registering with either ASCAP or BMI as both a publisher and a songwriter. This will cost you approximately $100. (25%)
      • Cover song: obtaining a mechanical license from the publisher. This will cost less than $100. (25%)

Instructor: Christopher Opperman, cdo25@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:700:311 Art of Production I: Recording

Art of Production I: Recording

Course Number: 07:700:311
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The primary purpose of this class is to introduce students to the fundamentals of sound and the tools and techniques needed to record, edit, and process a wide variety of audio sources for music, videos, podcasts, audiobooks, and other media outlets. Students will engage in ear training using current and historical recordings to help develop critical listening and the ability to set their own sonic goals. Lessons include topics and discussion of acoustics, microphones, mixers, speakers, recorders, digital audio workstations (DAWs), signal processing, project studios, and the real-world practices of the professional studio and will provide the tools for students to confidently pursue their own recording projects.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:700:105 or 127 or 135
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of Art of Production I: Recording, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following:

  • Basic properties of sound and hearing
  • Best practices and equipment for capturing musical instruments and other audio sources as desired
  • Best practices to use technology to create original recordings, as desired, and edit them
  • The distinctive factors of analog and digital gear, and the basics of audio digitization and data manipulation
  • Audio processing equipment, and the ability to utilize the audio studio to produce desired results

Instructor: Adam Klein, ak2035@rutgers.edu

07:700:312 Art of Production II: Mixing

Art of Production II: Mixing

Course Number: 07:700:312

07:700:468 Scoring for Film and Visual Media

Scoring for Film and Visual Media

Course Number: 07:700:468

07:700:469 Interactive Computer Music

Interactive Computer Music

Course Number: 07:700:469

Theater Courses

07:965:211 Theater Appreciation

Theater Appreciation

Course Number: 07:965:211
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Designed for nonmajors. Students attend a wide spectrum of theater offerings: Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off-Broadway, repertory, and university theater performances and, through discussion and lectures by professional artists, gain an appreciation of performance. Theater tickets and in-class presentation fee (generally, no text is required).

3 credit(s)

Learning Goals of Course:

  1. Examine critically philosophical and other theoretical issues concerning the nature of reality, human experience, knowledge, value, and/or cultural production through exposure to contemporary theater. Students will be able to analyze and appreciate the contribution Theater makes to the public debate on social issues and values. They will develop an understanding of the theatrical methods and techniques that are used to frame the debate.
  2. Analyze the art and literature of the Theater in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures and technologies. Contemporary theater production includes a wide range of plays and topics. Depending on availability, plays of previous times and values (Shakespeare, etc.) are studied along with plays of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Histories, values and cultures are compared and contrasted in class discussions.

Instructor: Jeffrey Bender, jbender@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:222 Performing Solo: From Stage to YouTube Online

Performing Solo: From Stage to YouTube

Course Number: 07:965:222
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a performance-based elective course designed for students of all disciplines who wish to persuasively communicate in person or on video. If you’re scared of public speaking, then this class is a great way to find your comfort zone, from the comfort of your own home. Students will try vlogging, stand-up, monologues, narration, and even multi-character dialogue, with the help of a supportive instructor and class. Students will study these formats through lectures and by watching videos. Students will have the freedom to write their own scripts on a variety of topics important to them. Performance experience is not required to take this course. These skills are not only used in entertainment, but also in video conferencing and marketing for any profession. No matter your major or future career, this course can help you be the person who is confident, comfortable, and stands out.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goal:

  • Using theatrical performance language, students will learn to analyze the genre of solo performance in relation to the genre’s specific history and formats.
  • Students will engage critically in the process of developing original creative solo performance material by writing in multiple solo performance styles and genres, as well as giving and receiving productive critiques.
  • Students will develop communicative skills and self-awareness inherent in the process of performing their original work for the on-camera assignments.

Course Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

  • The unit lectures combined with the unit quizzes will teach students the terminology, definitions, concepts, and methodology of the Solo Performance styles and genres.
  • The performance video assignments will teach students how to verbally communicate, sort, and construct a personal speech, presentation, or performance.
  • The unit discussion assignments will teach students to compare and solve issues and questions related to topical information.
  • Giving and receiving classmate critiques on the video performances will teach students to sort and build their performance understanding and confidence.
  • The writing assignments will teach students to write, identify, and construct their thoughts through written communication.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: ## Course Assignments

These are the types of assignments you will encounter in the course:

  • Unit Lectures - lectures consist of reading the content and viewing the chosen videos within the lectures.
  • Unit Quizzes - quizzes consist of multiple-choice questions based on the content of the lectures.
  • Unit Video Assignments - the videos will be performed, recorded, edited, and uploaded by the students.
  • Each video will be seen by the instructor and fellow students. Constructive criticism will be given. The Final
  • Presentation assignment is a video assignment.
  • Unit Discussion Assignments - discussion topics will be given to the class and students will be asked to respond to the topic and each other in an online forum.
  • Unit Video Critiques - constructive criticism on fellow students' video assignments.
  • Unit Writing Assignments - creative writing assignments that are designed to help the students choose their final presentation topic and solo performance style.

Course Grading

Final Grade Percentages

  • Writing Assignments (5 total) 15%
  • Performance Video Assignments excluding Final (6 total) 30%
  • Unit Quizzes (4 total) 8%
  • Discussions (5 total) 10%
  • Presentation Pitch Research Paper (1 total) 5%
  • Critique of Classmates (6 total) 12%
  • Final Performance Presentation (1 total) 20%
  • TOTAL 100%

Instructor: Raymond McAnally, raymonmc@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:225 Creating Characters Onstage and Online

Creating Characters Onstage and Online

Course Number: 07:965:225
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This is a performance-based elective course designed for students of all disciplines who wish to persuasively communicate in person or on video. If you’re scared of public speaking, then this class is a great way to find your comfort zone, from the comfort of your own home. Students will try vlogging, stand-up, monologues, narration, and even multi-character dialogue, with the help of a supportive instructor and class. Students will study these formats through lectures and by watching videos. Students will have the freedom to write their own scripts on a variety of topics important to them. Performance experience is not required to take this course. These skills are not only used in entertainment, but also in video conferencing and marketing for any profession. No matter your major or future career, this course can help you be the person who is confident, comfortable, and stands out.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: The goal of this course is to analyze the craft of acting in relation to specific techniques and disciplines, in order to engage critically in the process of developing original characters and creative performance material. Each student will experience the benefits of creating, writing, and performing their character work on camera, as well as giving and receiving productive critiques.

The communicative skills, behavioral study, empathy, and self-awareness learned herein will aid students in their individual fields of study and future careers. The class will focus on critical analysis of performance, artistic research of human behavior, and the ability to express one’s thoughts coherently through both verbal and written communication skills.

Objectives

  • Using theatrical performance language, students will learn to analyze a variety of acting techniques, in relation to the technique’s specific history and purpose for exploring characters.
  • Students will engage critically in the process of developing original creative performance material by writing and performing various acting techniques to create new characters, as well as giving and receiving productive critiques.
  • Students will develop communicative skills and self-awareness inherent in the process of performing their original work for the on-camera assignments.

Learning Outcomes
After participating in this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand and utilize the terminology, definitions, concepts, and methodology of the acting techniques covered in the Unit Lectures and reinforced by the Unit Quizzes.
  • Verbally communicate, sort, and construct a personal speech, presentation, or performance as learned through their experience preparing for the video assignments.
  • Compare and solve issues and questions related to topical information as learned through Unit Discussion assignments.
  • Sort and build their performance understanding and confidence by giving and receiving constructive Classmate Critiques for the course video assignments.
  • Write, identify, and construct their thoughts through writing assignments.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
These are the types of assignments you will encounter in the course:

  • Unit Lectures - lectures consist of reading the content and viewing the chosen videos within the lectures.
  • Unit Quizzes - quizzes consist of multiple-choice questions based on the content of the lectures.
  • Unit Video Assignments - the videos will be performed, recorded, edited, and uploaded by the students. Each video will be seen by the instructor and fellow students. Constructive criticism will be given. The Final Presentation assignment is a video assignment.
  • Unit Discussion Assignments - discussion topics will be given to the class and students will be asked to respond to the topic and each other in an online forum.
  • Unit Video Critiques - constructive criticism on fellow students' video assignments.
  • Unit Writing Assignments - creative writing assignments that are designed to help the students choose their final presentation topic and solo performance style.

Course Grading
Final Grade Percentages

  • Writing Assignments (5 total)15%
  • Performance Video Assignments excluding Final (6 total) 30%
  • Unit Quizzes (4 total) 8%
  • Discussions (5 total) 10%
  • Character Research Paper (1 total) 5%
  • Critique of Classmates (6 total) 12%
  • Final Performance Presentation (1 total) 20%
  • TOTAL 100%

Instructor: Raymond McAnally, raymonmc@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:230 Theater Appreciation Online

Students attend a wide spectrum of theater offerings including Broadway, off-Broadway, off-off-Broadway, regional, educational, and community events, and, through viewing those theatrical productions and online lectures, gain an appreciation of performance and everything that goes into producing theater.

3 Credits

Note: Students will not receive credit for both 07:965:230 and 07:965:211. This course does not fulfill any SAS core requirements.

07:965:231 Theater History I Online

Theater History I Online

Course Number: 07:965:231
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

The objective is to examine the traditions of primarily Western theater from its origins to the English Restoration, within the context of wider cultural and political developments.

The class focuses on the relationship of these dramatic traditions to current issues such as gender, race, power, and identity, as well as theater as a vital expression of universal human empathy.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the relationship of theater to ritual, ceremony, and performance in everyday life;
  • Compare, contrast, and interrogate theater/performance traditions through such lenses as race, gender, class, and colonialism, with a particular emphasis on centering traditionally marginalized/ignored/oppressed voices; 
  • Identify shifting historical approaches to theater production and performance;
  • Distinguish between different dramatic genres and styles, and identify their historical evolution.

Learning Outcomes

  • Construct coherent, analytical, critical written arguments that synthesize course concepts;
  • Demonstrate close engagement with course readings and comprehension of course concepts and facts;
  • Critically and creatively engage with other students via select assignments.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
Over the semester, the student will submit:

  • One video introduction
  • Eleven weekly open-book quizzes on the readings (lecture plus any additional readings)
  • One Visual Connections assignment
  • One closed-book Overview Exam
  • One Life Connections Assignment

Note: There are NO extra-credit assignments for this class.

Course Grading
Note: Please see the Assessment Rubrics page in the Course Essentials modules for further details.

Final Grade Calculation (Assignment Percentage)

  • Life Connections 40%
  • Overview Exam 25%
  • Weekly Quizzes (11 total) 30% (2.72% each)
  • Visual Connections 4%
  • Introduction Video 1%

Instructor: David Letwin, dpletwin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:232 Theater History II Online

Theater History II Online

Course Number: 07:965:232
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Theater II picks up where the first class leaves off and takes us to the present time.

A survey of key theater developments, concepts, and trends, primarily Western, from the 18th Century to the present, within the broader context of emergent modernity, the crises this radical change produced, and the range of artistic responses to this new — and destabilizing — reality.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the relationship of theater to ritual, ceremony, and performance in everyday life;
  • Compare, contrast, and interrogate theater/performance traditions through such lenses as race, gender, class, modernity, and colonialism, with a particular emphasis on centering traditionally marginalized/ignored/oppressed voices;
  • Identify shifting historical approaches to theater production and performance;
  • Distinguish between different dramatic genres and styles, and identify their historical evolution.

Learning Outcomes

  • Construct coherent, analytical, critical written arguments that synthesize course concepts;
  • Demonstrate close engagement with course readings and comprehension of course concepts and facts;
  • Critically and creatively engage with other students via select assignments.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: In addition to what is already posted on the Canvas course site (weekly lectures and links to some of the plays), you will need to pick up one book and several plays that are not in the public domain. Please see the "Weekly Supplemental Readings List" page in the "Course Essentials" module for details. 
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Assignments
Over the semester, the student will:

  • One video introduction
  • Eleven weekly open-book quizzes on the readings (lecture plus any additional readings)
  • One Visual Connection assignment
  • Two discussions assignments 
  • One closed-book Overview Exam
  • One Blog/Paper Assignment

Note: There are NO extra-credit assignments for this class.

Grading
Note: Please see the Assessment Rubrics page in the Course Essentials modules for further details.

Final Course Grade Calculation (Assignment Percentage)

  • Blog/Paper 30%
  • Discussion Threads (2 total) 30% (15% each)
  • Overview Exam 21%
  • Weekly Quizzes (11 total) 15% (1.36% each)
  • Visual Connection 3%
  • Introduction Video 1%

Instructor: David Letwin, dpletwin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:240 Staging Resistance: Theater, Protest, and Social Change Online

Staging Resistance: Theater, Protest, and Social Change Online

Course Number: 07:965:240
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Through plays and other performance texts, videos, graphics, media accounts, and critical theory readings, this class will explore the vibrant tradition of the atricalized or staged resistance to the injustice and inequality endemic to contemporary culture. Sources include: plays and films that explicitly challenge embedded power hierarchies; radical performative disruptions such as Pussy Riot, Occupy Wall Street, and Take a Knee protests; and participatory community-engaged theater for social change.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: This course is based on the principle of “Dual-Purpose Content,” in which the curriculum a) facilitates the acquisition of discipline-specific knowledge, and b) serves to develop critical, analytical, and creative thinking.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the historical development of “staged resistance,” beginning with the first-wave European avant-garde movements of the late nineteenth/early twentieth century, through to the present
  • Identify how class, race, gender, nationality, sexuality — among other identity markers — intersect with “staged resistance.”
  • Analyze the ways in which “staged resistance” overlaps with and breaks from the aesthetics/techniques of traditional theater.

Learning Outcomes

  • Construct coherent, analytical, critical written arguments that synthesize course concepts.
  • Demonstrate close engagement with course readings and comprehension of course concepts and facts.
  • Critically, analytically, and creatively engage with other students via discussions assignments based on course material.
  • Incorporate course concepts into creative final project.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Course Structure and Assignments
Note: Assignments subject to change

The course is organized around weekly modules/case studies. Over the semester, the student will:

  • One video introduction
  • Eleven weekly open-book quizzes on the readings (lecture plus any additional readings)
  • Two Visual Connection assignments
  • Two discussions assignments
  • One closed-book Final Exam
  • One Blog Assignment

Final Grade Calculation

  • Blog Project 30%
  • Discussion Threads (2 total) 32% (16% each)
  • Final Exam 21%
  • Weekly Quizzes (11 total) 16% (1.45% each)
  • Introduction Video 1%

Instructor: David Letwin, dpletwin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:271 Basic Acting

Basic Acting

Course Number: 07:965:271

This course is designed to provide students a basic understanding of the technique of acting. Students discover the basic approaches to the technique of acting through active participation in exercises, improvisations, and scene work.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

07:965:281 Theater History I

Theater History

Course Number: 07:965:281
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Western theatrical traditions from Greek through contemporary avant-garde theater. See 07:965:231-232 for online offering. Students may not receive credit for both 07:965:231-232 and 07:965:281-282.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will explore the historical context in which plays were written and major historical events and players that have significantly contributed to theater.
  • Students will leave the class with a better understanding that theater history must not be looked at as one movement leading to the next, but as a series of movements often occurring simultaneously and in conversation with one another.
  • Students will examine critically aesthetic and theoretical issues concerning theater and performance (SAS Core Curriculum AH.C.o.), as well as analyze theatrical literature in relation to specific histories, values, cultures, and technologies.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:281 Theater History II

Theater History II

Course Number: 07:965:282

07:965:302 Theater For Social Development

Theater For Social Development

Course Number: 07:965:302
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Theater for Social Development is designed to develop students' understanding of how the arts can be integrated into community development and engaged social interventions.

3 credit(s)

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will read and analyze research from leading thinkers and practitioners in the fields of racial and social justice art, socially engaged art, social practice art, applied theater, and community development.
  • Students will analyze sustainable practices in socially engaged arts and extrapolate sustainable frameworks in the field for the development of fully creative communities.
  • Students will forge connections through on-site, or virtual visits to New Brunswick non-profit agencies that engage with the arts to further their social advocacy work.
  • Students will be able to estimate and evaluate the potential effects of arts-based interventions.
  • Students will synthesize the course theory to conceptualize a socially engaged art project that integrates concepts of community identity, social advocacy, and professional artistic technique.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

Reading List

  • Seeing Power: Art and Activism in the Twenty-first Century by Nato Thompson. Publisher: Melville House (December 12, 2014). ISBN-10: 1612190448. ISBN-13: 978-1612190440
  • Applying Performance: Live Art, Socially Engaged Theatre and Affective Practice by N. Shaughnessy. Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2012 edition (July 6, 2012). Publication Date: July 6, 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0230241336. ISBN-10: 0230241336.
  • Education for Socially Engaged Art: A Materials and Techniques Handbook by Pablo Helguera. Publisher: Jorge Pinto Books Inc. (October 5, 2011). ISBN-10: 1934978590. ISBN-13: 978-1934978597.
  • Theatre of the Oppressed by Augusto Boal. Publisher: Theatre Communications Group; Tcg ed. edition (January 1, 1993). ISBN-10: 0930452496. ISBN-13: 978-0930452490.
  • Articles, Online Journals, Podcasts

The following content is available online:

Other works worth knowing about but not required for this class:

  • The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City by Elisabeth Currid-Hacklet (Selections). Publisher: Princeton University Press; New edition with a New preface by the author edition (October 19, 2008). ISBN-10: 0691138745. ISBN-13: 978-0691138749.
  • Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship by Claire Bishop. Publisher: Verso; Original edition (July 24, 2012). ISBN-10: 1844676900. ISBN-13: 978-1844676903.
  • Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics by Shannon Jackson. Publisher: Routledge (April 7, 2011). ISBN-10: 0415486009. ISBN-13: 978-0415486002.
  • Method Meets Arts: Arts-Based Research Practices by Patricia Levy. Publisher: The Guilford Press; Second edition (January 8, 2015). ISBN-10: 9781462513321. ISBN-13: 978-1462513321.
  • Location-Based and Audience-Aware Storytelling: Grace Plains and Bodies for a Global Brain. https://howlround.com/location-based-and-audience-aware-storytelling-grace-plains-and-bodies-for-a-global-brain

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Ars Brevis (1): “Art Brief” – A take on the Latin phrase “Ars Longa, Vita Brevis” (Trs: Art is long, Life is Short). Because life is short, we will attempt to get to the quick on large concepts and ideas. As this course is a cooperative conversation there will be a need for additional information from time to time. Students will be required at least twice during the semester to develop a quick turnaround report on a topic, community, company, form, or concept. The topic will be researched outside of class time and the student will present a 1 page “brief” as well as a 5-minute in class presentation.

Case Study Paper (1): Students will choose a particular event, company, or concept that they wish to take a “deep dive” into. The project will take the form of a case study which will be outlined over the course of the semester but will include the need for detailed descriptions of the key aspects of the subject matter as well as analysis of how the subject matter correlates to the students understanding of key terminology.

Concept Proposal (1): Students will participate in a devised Art for Social Development Project presentation. The presentation will be structured as a “pitch” for potential participants and funders.

Class Participation and Assignments: This class is being taught in a synchronous/asynchronous hybrid model. Course materials will be released on a weekly basis. Students will be expected to complete readings and assignments during the scheduled times.

Class Discussion Boards: Students will be expected to participate in all required CANVAS class conversations. The course is designed to allow time for comments and feedback from all participants.

Readings: Students are expected to complete all assigned readings.

Assessment
Assessment Area - Percentage of Final Grade

  • Class Discussions - 20%
  • Ars Brevis - 20%
  • Mid-Term Case Study - 20%
  • Final Project and Presentation - 30%
  • Reading Responses - 10%

Course Rubric
Below is a sample course rubric. Assessments will be made for each student at the time of the mid-term evaluation and end of semester. However, a rubric may be delivered to a student at any time during the semester at the professor’s discretion.

Assessment Scale

  • Mastery – approaching professional standard
  • Competency – good working knowledge
  • Developing – working towards knowledge
  • Unacceptable – little to no understanding or growth

Area of Assessment

  1. Student is able to comprehend, synthesize, and articulate new knowledge in the field of arts-based community development. Student completes selected readings on time and is able to participate in class discussions.
  2. Student approaches their work creatively and generates design sample ideas for arts-based community development interventions.
  3. Student is able to engage with a professional demeanor with class guests in arts-based community development efforts - including proper attendance and detailed question asking and knowledge sharing.
  4. Student is able to think critically and estimate and evaluate the potential effects of arts-based work and interventions.
  5. Student is able to work cooperatively within a team project design model.

Instructor: John Keller, jpkeller@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:965:330 Improving Communication Through Improvisation

Improving Communication Through Improvisation

Course Number: 07:965:330
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-face

From vaccination campaigns to climate science, we need to do better at communicating. This course teaches communication skills using techniques from theater improvisation. It will be especially helpful for students seeking to convey their technical research for non-specialists.

3 credits

07:965:350 Improv & Theater Games

Improv & Theater Games

Course Number: 07:965:350

This course is designed to provide the student with the skills to utilize the basic improvisational theater games and exercises for the student who has some experience in acting.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:965:271

07:965:370 Global Theater

Global Theater

Course Number: 07:965:370
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Global Theater explores the theories and practices — the ideas behind the art — of theater and theatrical performance in the 21st century, with an emphasis on historical perspectives and contemporary applications. Through questioning the nature and function of the art form and interdisciplinary comparisons, the students are encouraged to examine their own values and beliefs and how those values and beliefs might shape the future.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Theater History 1 & 2

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will read and discuss works by playwrights, philosophers and aesthetic theorists from diverse cultures and epochs.
  • Students will analyze how different societies and perspectives shape the theatrical form and the experience of it.
  • Students will examine critically aesthetic and theoretical issues concerning theater and performance (SAS Core Curriculum AH.C.o.), as well as analyze theatrical literature in relation to specific histories, values, cultures and technologies.

Instructor: Christopher Cartmill, cjc289@mgsa.rutgers.edu

Takeaways

  • We are all artists. These courses will help you develop your individual voice.
  • Learn creative approaches that can be applied in a wide range of career paths.
  • Engage with the critical issues of our day through new means of communication and expression.