Art & Design

Courses

Undergraduate Courses

07:081:105 Visual Arts Practice

Visual Arts Practice

Course Number: 07:081:105
Course Title: Visual Arts Practice
Credits: (BA — by arrangement)

Involves supervised practical experience with the Department of Art & Design’s studios, computers, media or photography labs, and galleries, or in artistic organizations or context across the university and in the larger community. Substantive projects outside of the department may qualify. Three credits are required of all BFA visual arts majors; 2 credits are required of all BA art majors. Design majors do not complete VAP. Students must register for the course to earn academic credit.

07:081:121 Drawing Fundamentals

Drawing Fundamentals

Course Number: 07:081:121
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This introductory course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of drawing. Students are taught to see the three-dimensional world around them and to capture what they are perceiving in two-dimensions. Projects are designed to increase the student’s technical and perceptual ability within a variety of drawing-based approaches. The first half of the semester focuses on the use of line to address composition, creating space, perspective, accuracy in “seeing,” and mastery of materials such as pencil and charcoal. The second half of the semester focuses on the use of value, gesture, and mark-making to address similar formal and structural components and additionally introduces work with pen and ink. Critiques and discussions address both the formal and conceptual aspects of drawing such as ideation, subject, meaning, context, intentionality, and alternate readings of the work among others. Art historical and contemporary art examples will be introduced throughout the course, and it is expected that students make at least one trip to New York City during the semester to explore contemporary galleries and attend three visiting artist lectures.

4 credits

Learning Goals of Course: Students will demonstrate in a final portfolio mastery of the fundamental skills of observational drawing including: accuracy in perceptual ability; a sensitivity to line; an understanding of compositional strategies; a working knowledge of one and two point perspective; a sensitivity to value (wide tonal range), gesture, and mark-making. Students will posess the ability to incorporate these into successful compositional strategies; and demonstrate how volume and space can be achieved through a variety of approaches. They will master the materials of pencil, charcoal and pen and ink, and possess the skills to work with equal facility in line and value. In addition, they will develop a working vocabulary with which to assess their own drawing-based work, the work of their peers, and how the fundamental lessons of drawing can be applied to all visual art.

07:081:122 4-D Fundamentals

4-D Fundamentals: Time and Space

Course Number: 07:081:122

Working with the computer and with everyday technologies including smart phones, the internet, cameras, and audio recording devices, students learn fundamentals of time- and screen-based contemporary art practices. The class introduces students to a range of experimental techniques and approaches, working with photomontage, image sequencing, video recording and editing, and sound. The class includes screenings, demos, workshops, labs, readings, group discussions, and critiques. Students will develop their own creative and independent voices while working on a series of focused assignments. The course will culminate in a public screening of student artwork produced during the course.

4 credits

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:200 Seminar in Contemporary Art A

Seminar in Contemporary Art A

Course Number: 07:081:200

The focus of the seminar is on actual works of art, beginning with Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and culminating with current exhibitions of contemporary art. Students are required to go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in the first semester, and to familiarize themselves with galleries in New York, particularly in Chelsea and the Lower East Side, during the second semester. Work in all media from painting, drawing, and sculpture to film, photography, and performance will be discussed.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 01:082:105-106

Instructor: John Yau, johnyau@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:221 Drawing I-A

Drawing I-A

Course Number: 07:081:221
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course will explore the historical roots and contemporary application of the radical and conceptual process known as collage. Ideas of fracture, montage, image/object, process and environment will all be explored as students develop their own vocabulary and studio practice. Historical models, relevant texts, and contemporary artists will be examined, research, special projects and group and individual critiques are an integral part of the course.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:081:121
Learning Goals of Course:

Learning Goals
Through practice, experimentation, research, and the use of various media, students will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Conceptualize, create, analyze and critique all forms of collage
  • Demonstrate through a final portfolio an understanding of the structural concepts of collage: fracture, synthesis, sequence, chronology, repetition and montage
  • Demonstrate through critique and discussion an ability to articulate how specific practices integrate the conceptual, material and formal aspects of collage.

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:227 Visual Thinking A

Visual Thinking A: Black and White

Course Number: 07:081:227
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of “visual thinking”, or the basic formal and conceptual aspects of visual art and design which address issues related to visual culture, history, image/object, representation, and artistic intentionality. Projects are designed to increase the students’ technical and conceptual ability within a variety of visual arts mediums and approaches. Critiques and discussions play a crucial role in the course in analyzing work and art historical and contemporary art examples are introduced throughout. Students are expected to make at least one trip to NYC during the semester to tour contemporary galleries.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Transform ideas and materials from one form into another
  • Demonstrate and document the process of making from ideation and concept to final execution
  • Convey time and motion
  • Conduct artistic research
  • Utilize a variety of formal design strategies such as figure/ground; sequence and narrative; symmetry/asymmetry; modularity; gestalt theory, etc. with respect to their effects
  • Analyze, critique, and interpret their own work, and the work of others.

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:231 Design I-A

Design A: Type and Typography

Course Number: 07:081:231

Introduction to typography, the practice of making verbal language visual. Builds visual awareness of letterforms and their composition in space through studio projects that engage with type as a means for clear communication and visual expression. In addition to studio work, this course demands absorbing technical and historical knowledge in order to develop a visual sensitivity for typographic form.

Typography is the core of graphic design. We are familiar with the use of written language to exchange ideas with other people. The practice of typography is to give this language a visual form, material, and method of distribution. In this course, we will learn the fundamentals of type such as typefaces, type sizes, leading, kerning, grids, guides, composition, space, color, and motion.

For three studio projects, you will be given parameters with which to learn tools, historical and contemporary references, and formal vocabulary of typography. As Robin Kinross states in Modern Typography, “design is understood not as a noun but as a verb: an activity and a process.” We will continuously build upon the work of previous weeks in order to develop conceptual ideas, a strong understanding of typographic rules, and playful ways to address constraints. We encourage you to take risks, make mistakes, and be open to the critiques of your instructor, classmates, and visiting critics. This is how we learn.

This studio course will also build technical and practical skills towards a fluency in setting and manipulating type within a contemporary digital environment. Students will understand and use fonts and typesetting software to create and analyze typographic prototypes for both print and screen.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Instructor: Mindy Seu, mseu@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:243 Media I-A

Media I-A: Introduction to Media Art: Screen/Image/Sound

Course Number: 07:081:243

This introductory course focuses on the production and concepts of screen-based media artwork. Students learn about the interdisciplinary field of media art, which can include video art, installation, and video sculpture; artists’ cinema; experimental film and video; participatory art; live media performance; and art for the internet. Students learn to navigate a landscape of continuously changing technologies and devices. The course includes lectures, workshops, technical demos, readings, critiques of student work, and screenings of artists works. Students create a series of group and individual media art projects. No technical experience required.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites

Instructor: Steffani Jemison, steffani.jemison@rutgers.edu

07:081:244 Media I-B

Media I-B: Experimental Practices and Techniques

Course Number: 07:081:244

A course on experimental approaches to screen-based media art including experimental documentary and narrative, collage and montage, sampling, remixing, and abstraction. The course includes a series of technical workshops that may include 2-D animation, compositing, and other visual and digital tools and effects. Screening and discussions about media art in relation to art history and contemporary art. Includes lectures, workshops, technical demos, readings, critiques of student work, and screenings of artists’ works. Students create a series of short video and sound artworks.

4 credits

Instructor: Steffani Jemison, steffani.jemison@rutgers.edu

07:081:251 Painting I-A

Painting I-A

Course Number: 07:081:251
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduces a range of technical and experimental approaches to painting with oil and/or acrylic in ways that relate to the histories of Western Modernist painting. The course offers varied and dynamic approaches to the problems of structure, shape, materiality and color, both in representation and abstraction. The development of formal coherence and imagery are guided and practiced through individual and group critiques, slide presentations of a rich cross-section of painters and painting practices, selecrted readings, and museum visits. This class also introduces students to the vocabulary and critical skills to be able to articulate what they are seeing and making.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • To understand and develop a perceptual engagement with painting that draws on the history, techniques, processes and models of an array of western modernist painters and painting practices
  • To gain key foundational skills and knowledge of the materials and techniques of painting
  • To learn to analyze, articulate and critique what one sees with greater confidence
  • To learn to see the world through the lens of art and see art through its relation to other art, as much as to the world

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students in this course will be required to purchase an assortment of basic foundational paints, painting tools, and materials

07:081:261 Photography I-A

Photography I-A: Introduction to Digital Photography

Course Number: 07:081:261

A rigorous introduction to digital photography, featuring the digital camera, digital image file development including camera RAW, and the presentation of photographs on screen and in print. This studio-based course explores photography by considering technical, creative, historical, cultural, and critical issues of the multifaceted medium of photography.

4 credits

Instructor: Adam Putnam, ap1675@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:262 Photography I-B

Photography I-B: Darkroom Photography

Course Number: 07:081:262

Explores the foundations of film photography with an emphasis on technique and aesthetic concerns, coupled with an introduction to the history of photography. Emphasizes mastery of the 35mm and large format film camera techniques, lighting, black-and-white film development, gelatin silver printing, visual literacy, editing, and presentation methods.

4 credits

Instructor: Adam Putnam, ap1675@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:271 Print I-A

Print I-A: Silkscreen

Course Number: 07:081:271

In-depth exploration of silkscreen including hand-drawn, computer-generated positives, and production. The course encourages the combination of other print media and will include a short segment on print as a 3-D structure. Artistic development concerning composition, content, and conceptual ideas will be addressed through individual and group critiques.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:272 Print I-B

Print I-B: Relief

Course Number: 07:081:272
Course Title: Print I-B
Subtitle: Relief
Credits: 4

In-depth exploration of woodcut, linocut, reduction print; work will be in both black-and-white and printing of multicolored blocks including reduction block printing. The course encourages the combination of other print media. Artistic development concerning composition, content, and conceptual ideas will be addressed through individual and group critiques.  

Learning Goals:

  • To understand the terminology and methods of the Relief printmaking medium for making works of art.
  • To be conversant with multiple introductory terms involved in the Relief printing processes.
  • To understand the processes of preparing plates and gain the ability to mix inks for printing and achieve the successful pulling of a print.
  • To explore individual artistic vision by developing personal imagery and content through the use of Relief printing as a visually expressive medium.
  • To understand the fundamental composition of the elements and principles of design as well as work together with creative problem-solving procedures from planning and discovery to implementation and evaluation with each successive print.
  • To investigate color and understand how essential color characteristics and usage in the sequencing of colored layers affects the compositional space.
  • To grasp the historic traditions of Relief Printing and realize the different directions and issues of contemporary printmaking and integrate new artistic approaches to historic Relief Printing processes.
  • To produce at least one work that demonstrates an interdisciplinary approach to art making
  • To complete Relief Printmaking projects that represent evidence of extensive technical ability and process as well as profundity in conceptually challenging works of art.
  • To understand that professional presentation, skills and craftmanship will be demonstrated through: Plate Prep, Color Mixing, printing the colors, color registration, registration methods, curating, signing the prints, care of prints, and quality of finished editions.
07:081:281 Sculpture I-A

Sculpture I-A

Course Number: 07:081:281
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of sculpture utilizing traditional and non-traditional techniques. Successful completion of the course will include familiarity and competency with a wide range of hand tools and machines in the wood and metal shops, an understanding of additive and subtractive sculptural techniques, and knowledge of mold-making techniques. Students will integrate the techniques and concepts of sculpture into their studio practice. This course incorporates presentations on sculptural and artistic work in the filed, readings, discussions, field trips, and visits with guest lecturers.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge and skills to:

  • Utilize shop equipment and tools in a safe and productive manner
  • Understand notions of form through basic ideas like line, plane, weight, surface, color, volume, and space
  • Demonstrate basic skills with the following processes: addition, subtraction, basic wood fabrication, metal fabrication, plaster pouring, and mold makingSynthesize
  • Synthesize forms and the meanings that arise from them
  • Utilize a working knowledge of terminology fundamental in sculpture
  • Demonstrate an awareness of contemporary art/sculptural practices in the broader field via critiques, discussions and in relation to their own work
07:081:310 Seminar in Photography

Seminar in Photography

Course Number: 07:081:310
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course examines historical and contemporary discourses in photography. The course will include detailed discussion of major theoretical approaches to photography. Students encounter aspects of the history of photography and its interaction with other cultural forms through the development of historical, cultural, and political factors and their relationships to the present through key readings, lectures, screenings, and guest speakers.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: Students will be able to develop and apply critical analysis when looking at images that considers historical, cultural, and theoretical issues related to photography, art in general and culture at large.

Students will develop analytical and critical skills in visual, verbal, and written form as they relate to the understanding, discussion, description and evaluation of photography

Students will be able to examine context as a basis for our understanding of material culture

Instructor: Miranda Lichtenstein, mlichtenstein@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:313 Ceramics Sculpture

Ceramics Sculpture

Course Number: 07:081:313
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course provides an introduction to ceramic sculpture with an emphasis on hand-building methods. Students will learn methods of building ceramic sculptures by techniques of pinch building, slab, coil, press hump mold construction, wheel and slip casting. The history and theories of ceramics and related sculptural practices will be introduced alongside various methods of construction, surface treatment, glaze chemistry, and firing methodology. Students will also engage in presentations, critiques, discussions, filed trips and visiting lectures.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of the course, students will:

  • Demonstrate fundamental knowledge in the utilization and application of ceramic materials, techniques and concepts
  • Synthesize technical and creative knowledge and processes in the creation of new work
  • Demonstrate understanding of terminology relative to the field of ceramics
  • Develop ability to experiment with ideas in the processes of making art through independent creative projects within and between art media

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Most of the basic tools/materials required in this course are provided. However additional tools you may need can vary and change along with the work you are making.

  • Sketchbook
  • Apron or smock
  • Plastic
  • Additional items you might want: a sculpture stand; paddle; additional hand tools, specific brushes. These can be purchased online (see resources).

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Participation is necessary in critiques, discussions, guests and collaborative projects

  • Development of creative work that is original, innovative and evidences a deepening knowledge of the medium
  • Maintaining a studio production schedule to meet deadlines
  • Documentation of all required assignments
  • Maintaining a sketchbook for ideas and technical notes is required
  • Attendance. More than 3 unexcused absences will result in a failing grade

Instructor: Nora Normile, nora.normile@rutgers.edu

07:081:321 Drawing II-A

Drawing II-A: Drawing and Animation

Course Number: 07:081:321
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course examines the relationship of drawing to time and media-based practices, specifically through the history and techniques of animation. Exploring traditional and experimental animation, students will examine how drawing can mark space and movement to create an illusion of time. Starting from pre-cinematic animation techniques through the realm of the digital, students will examine the impact of technology both technically and conceptually. Students will develop a critical understanding of animation and “the animated” as it relates to personal iconography/biography and social/political circumstances through the lens of the current zeitgeist.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:081:121
Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of the course students will possess the skills to ideate, create and produce several analog, experimental, short animated films of their own within a variety of approaches such as traditional multi-plane animation, rotoscoping, drawing/erasure, collage, stop motion, and other forms of traditional/experimental animation. Students will acquire the critical vocabulary to discuss, analyze and critique their own work and the work of others and possess a working knowledge of concepts such as non-linear narrative, narrative story-telling, composition in time, visual poetry, and transformation and metamorphosis.

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:324 Figure Drawing

Figure Drawing

Course Number: 07:081:324
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Working from a live, nude model, students explore how to accurately draw the figure. Observational accuracy, quality of line and tone, technique, and expression are all stressed as students become familiar with all aspects of drawing from the figure in pencil, ink, and charcoal.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Drawing Fundamentals is a co- or pre-req for this course.
Learning Goals of Course:
Students will have mastered:

  • Basic anatomical relationships as applied to the human form
  • A variety of media including charcoal, pencil, ink/wash
  • Descriptive and expressive use of mark, line, tone, contour, mass, movement, and rhythm
  • The ability to analyze, interpret, and critique their own work and the work of others

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:328 Design Seminar A: Histories

Design Seminar A: Histories

Course Number: 07:081:328
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Exploration of historical and contemporary critical debates in graphic design. Through readings, lectures, analysis, and presentations, students investigate the ways historical, cultural, political, and economic factors have shaped design. Students situate their practice within the design discourse of today through an examination of the development of the discipline.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

  • Upon completion of this course, students will be able to engage actively with the histories of design based on an understanding of the major theoretical and historical shifts in design practice over the last 150 years.
  • Students will be able to analyze the relationships between design objects, their production, distribution, and reception.
  • Students will understand the designer’s changing role and status over the last century and be able to apply this to their own practice as designers.

Instructor: Gerry Beegan, gbeegan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:329 Seminar in Painting

Seminar in Painting

Course Number: 07:081:329
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course consists of readings, presentations, and studio assignments pertaining to current painting practice and the precedents that created it. Through discussions in museums and galleries in the presence of painting, students practice looking and situating what we see with the help of the texts, and learn to engage painting discourse from within.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course: You will be exposed to a wide variety of contemporary painting practices and the discourses that surround them. You will learn discursive models and structures to support deeper and more discerning explorations in your own work, and the language with which to name what you see.

07:081:331 Design II-A

Design II-A

Course Number: 07:081:331
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Explores complex multi-part design systems such as visual identities and books. Develops skills in research, visual experimentation, using digital and analog tools for print and screen. Consists of studio work, critiques, technical demonstrations, lectures, readings and class discussions.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:081:231-232

Instructor: Jacqueline Thaw, thaw@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:343 Media II-A

Media II-A

Course Number: 07:081:343

This course focuses on making and displaying screen- and time-based media in galleries and other architectural environments. Students learn about sequencing in space as well as principles and practices of sound and exhibition design. The course explores how different spaces affect moving images, sound, and projections, and how moving images, sound, and projections can construct and alter space. Students learn about historical precedents and current practices, from pre-cinematic magic lantern shows to expanded cinema, and from video sculpture and site-specific installation art to multichannel video installations, urban screens, and artists’ cinema. The course includes technical workshops on syncing multiple channels of video and surround sound. Students create their own media installations and environments.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:243-244 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Steffani Jemison, steffani.jemison@rutgers.edu

07:081:351 Painting II-A

Painting II-A

Course Number: 07:081:351

This course nurtures individual growth as a painter in technical mastery and conceptual understanding. Emphasis is placed on working in increasingly self-directed series. Selected readings and visits to exhibitions required, as are group discussions and reviews.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:251-252 or permission of department.

Instructor: Stephen Westfall, westfall@rutgers.edu

07:081:361 Photography II-A

Photography II-A: Digital Image and Print

Course Number: 07:081:361
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Features the refinement of digital photography with an emphasis on making exhibition-quality prints and building print portfolios. Through creative assignments, this studio-based course explores photography with particular focus on expressive, historical, and theoretical aspects of the ubiquitous medium.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:261, or all students with Photoshop experience and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Adam Putnam, ap1675@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:371 Print II-A

Print II-A

Course Number: 07:081:371

In-depth focus on intaglio, including engraving, drypoint, etching, aquatint, and spit bite. The course encourages the combination of other print media and will include a segment on photo polymer plates. Artistic development concerning composition, content, and conceptual ideas will be addressed through individual and group critiques.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:372 Print II-B

Print II-B: Lithography

Course Number: 07:081:372

In-depth focus on lithography, including stones, aluminum plates, photo-litho plates, and color lithography. The course encourages the combination of other print media. Artistic development concerning composition, content, and conceptual ideas will be addressed through individual and group critiques.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:381 Sculpture II-A

Sculpture II-A

Course Number: 07:081:381
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In this intermediate-level course, students explore a selection of diverse concepts, materials, and processes associated with contemporary sculpture. Emphasis will be on exploring alternative methods of art production, expanding conceptual development as well as furthering students’ technical skills. The course will address the process and development in transforming ideas into form. The course incorporates presentations on the field of sculpture, readings, discussions, guest lectures, and field trips.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:081:281
Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge and skills to:

  • Continue developing production techniques with hand and stationary tools in the wood and metal shops into studio work
  • Further develop strategies in additive and subtractive sculptural techniques including fabrication in various non-traditional materials
  • Further develop mold making and plaster casting techniques for broad use
  • Utilize appropriate installation and finishing techniques
  • Develop a familiarity with the field of contemporary art and sculpture
  • Develop research and language for individual studio work
07:081:383 Design Seminar B: Issues in Contemporary Practice

Design Seminar B: Issues in Contemporary Practice

Course Number: 07:081:383
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Proposes diverse models for contemporary design practice through a series of lectures by guest designers and by related readings. Class discussions, assigned texts, and writing responses address the pragmatics of design, the designer’s role as a social agent, and design and politics. Helps students to situate their own research and develop a critical design language to analyze their own and others’ work. The course is intended to help students develop a personal philosophy of design and a sense of how they might practice as designers.

4 credit(s)

Learning Goals of Course: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the major areas of contemporary design practice and how these have evolved and are evolving.
  2. Evaluate the designer’s social, ethical, and ecological responsibilities.
  3. Engage actively in debates about these issues, communicating their opinions clearly, and respond to further questions and discussion.
  4. Write critically about a variety of texts.

Instructor: Gerry Beegan, gbeegan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:385 Design Practicum

Design Practicum

Course Number: 07:081:385
Course Format: Other
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course provides practical design experience where students undertake appropriate real-world assignments in a non-commercial environment. This is an advanced production studio for students interested in collaborating with academics from other fields, university administrators, NGO representatives, and other designers. Students will engage in research, concept development, design, production, and presentation. Students are expected to work in close contact with peers and outside collaborators to produce visual projects that meet mutually agreed upon parameters. This class should be taken in the junior or senior year when students have sufficient technical and conceptual experience to benefit from the class.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course:

On completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Analyze real world problems from multiple perspectives and propose design solutions
  • Define constraints and design strategies
  • Successfully present to and negotiate with clients and colleagues
  • Conduct visual research and present their findings in an appropriate format
  • Create professional presentations
  • Revise, refine and reiterate proposed designs in response to feedback
  • Prepare and adjust files for production

Instructor: Gerry Beegan, gbeegan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:421 Drawing III-A

Drawing III-A

Course Number: 07:081:421
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Through practice, experimentation, research, and use of a variety of media and methodologies, students will explore more complex approaches to their drawing practice. These may include: the use of image and text; the consideration and use of time, sequence, and narrative in drawing; and drawing as a performance practice, among others. Self-directed work and research in the studio including the reading of historical and/or critical texts are required.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 01:081:221 and 222 (Drawing I-A and I-B) or co-requisite 07:081:321 and 322 (Drawing II-A and II-B) or corequisite 07:081:451-454 (Painting III-A and III-B or Advanced Painting A or B) or by permission of the instructor.
Learning Goals of Course:
At the end of this course, the student is able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to ideate, create and produce a cohesive body of work, maintain a disciplined studio practice, and to present through the body of work a compelling position/argument/point of view/raison d’etre for the work in visual, verbal and written form
  • Examine and analyze theoretical and practical issues concerning the nature of the drawing discipline in the 21st century and to incorporate the history of drawing into their analysis of their own work and the work of others
  • Examine their own work and the work of others in relation to context(s), histories, process and materiality, and the relationship of the work to culture at large; and to analyze and critically examine the relationship of form/subject/content in these works.

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:423 Graphic Narratives

Graphic Narratives

Course Number: 07:081:423
Course Title: Graphic Narratives
Credits: 3

This course is co-listed with 01:355:410 Composing Graphic Narratives and taught by the Writing Program. Please see their website here for course description and instructor information.

07:081:431 Design III-A

Design III-A: Design for the Digital Realm

Course Number: 07:081:431
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course trains students to research, analyze, prototype, and develop design concepts for dynamic digital media such as online, tablets, and mobile apps, for three distinct social and cultural contexts. The focus is on practice and experimentation to master UI/UX design. This course consists of three projects addressing experience design and its presentation.

Today interaction online focuses on information through living, social platforms. We will go beyond an average user’s perspective to critically examine the web through historical, political, and social lenses. This course encourages students to holistically approach to the web and its constituent code as a living kit of parts waiting to be harnessed in novel and innovative ways.

As digital technology industries rapidly alter ways of doing and thinking, design can amplify, shift, comment on, and/or criticize these changes. The role of designers today is not only to style content but to shape it, extracting information from abstract datasets, writing scenarios, and creating systems, all with a critical eye.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Design 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B

Instructor: Mindy Seu, mseu@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:441 Media III-A

Media III-A: Independent Media Production

Course Number: 07:081:441

Students work under the direction of faculty and in discussion with the class on producing self-directed, independently conceived media artworks that reflect their own interests and ideas. Students will proceed through all stages to fully realize their work–from research, proposal, production, postproduction to installation, screening, or other form of display. Ongoing group discussions, critiques, readings, and screenings related to students’ creative projects.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:343-344 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Steffani Jemison, steffani.jemison@rutgers.edu

07:081:446 Advanced Media A

Advanced Media A

Course Number: 07:081:446

Students work under the direction of faculty and in discussion with the class on producing self-directed, independently conceived media artworks that reflect their own interests and ideas. Ongoing group discussions, critiques, readings, and screenings in media art.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:441-442 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Steffani Jemison, steffani.jemison@rutgers.edu

07:081:451 Painting III-A

Painting III-A

Course Number: 07:081:451
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

In this course, students will work in individual studios on self-directed projects, developing subject matter, content and methodology through directed research. Selected readings and visits to exhibitions and lectures are required, as is participation in group discussions, presentations, critiques and reviews.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:351-352. This course is intended primarily for students who have concentrated in this area. (This course is cross-listed with Advanced Painting A.)
Learning Goals of Course: You will learn to make self-directed work sustained and enriched by research, rigorous curiosity, and critical feedback, and acquire the growing capacity to tell the difference between intention versus outcome in your own work, as well as in that of your peers. You will form your own process and methodology, and develop your own markers for progress and resolution. You will learn to deepen your understanding of how your work is critically positioned within the larger field of painting, art, and culture.

07:081:452 Painting III-B

Painting III-B

Course Number: 07:081:452
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In this course, students will work in individual studios on self-directed projects, developing subject matter, content, and methodology through directed research. Selected readings and visits to exhibitions and lectures are required, as is participation in group discussions, presentations, critiques, and reviews.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:081:351-352 or permission of the area

Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Students will further develop their painting toward self-definition through studio work, research, dialogue, and immersion in relevant historical and contemporary painting culture. Students will form their own guidelines for process and progress, learn critical rigor, discernment and analysis, and practice work habits tailored to their specific strengths and weaknesses.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Painting and studio supplies

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Attendance and participation in all discussions, presentations, reviews, and critiques are paramount for a successful class. Three absences will result in a failing grade.

Instructor: Røgeberg, Hanneline; rogeberg@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:453 Advanced Painting A

Advanced Painting A

Course Number: 07:081:453
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students in this course are engaged in mentored individual work toward thesis, and explore how to sharpen and sustain the questions that will carry their work beyond it. These are identified and tested though individual studio visits with the instructor, group critiques; discussions of lectures, texts and exhibitions; instructor and student presentations; peer curation and review assignments.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:451-452. (This course is cross-listed with Painting III A.)
Learning Goals of Course: Students will deepen the clarity, criticality and complexity of their painting, and learn how to sustain their focus and research post-graduation with intellectual curiosity and good work habits. They will know the value of their peers and the importance of sustaining their community by seeing their practice as a relevant extension of it.

07:081:454 Advanced Painting B

Advanced Painting B

Course Number: 07:081:454
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students in this course are engaged in mentored individual work toward their thesis and explore how to sharpen and sustain the questions that will carry their work beyond it. These are identified and tested through individual studio visits with the instructor; group critiques; discussions of lectures, texts, and exhibitions; instructor and student presentations; peer curation; and review assignments.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:081:451 and 07:081:452
Course Corequisites:07:081:451 and 07:081:452
Learning Goals of Course: Students will further develop their painting toward self-definition through studio work, research, dialogue, and immersion in relevant historical and contemporary painting culture. Students will develop their own guidelines for process and progress, learn critical rigor, discernment and analysis, and practice work habits tailored to their specific strengths and weaknesses.
As the work grows in complexity and ambition, students develop a discursive position based on critical interests and formal affinities, among many other factors. With growing experience of their own authority, the student will learn how to edit, read, and tell the difference between intention versus outcome, both in their own work and in that of their peers in preparation for the culminating BFA Thesis.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Painting and studio supplies
Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading
Course Website (if applicable):

Instructor: Røgeberg, Hanneline; rogeberg@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:455 Advanced Drawing A

Advanced Drawing A

Course Number: 07:081:455
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students in this course work on self-directed exploratory-based drawing projects under the mentoring of the instructor and within the engaged, critical dialogue of their peers.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre or co-requisites: 07:081:321 or 322 (Drawing III-A or III-B); or 07:081:451-452 (Painting III-A or III-B)
Learning Goals of Course:
At the end of this course, students are able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to ideate, create and produce a cohesive body of work, to maintain a disciplined studio practice, and to present through the body of work a compelling position/argument/point of view/raison d’etre for the work in visual, verbal and written form
  • Examine and analyze theoretical and practical issues concerning the nature of the drawing discipline in the 21st century and to incorporate the history of drawing into their analysis of their own work and the work of others
  • Analyze and examine their own work and the work of others in relation to context(s), histories, process and materiality, and the relationship of the work to culture at large; and to analyze and critically examine the relationship of form/subject/content in these works

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:461 Photography III-A

Photography III-A: Exhibition and Portfolio

Course Number: 07:081:461
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In this course, students concentrate on individual artistic development by which they can develop an awareness and understanding of experimental and creative approaches to conceptual projects within the framework of contemporary photographic art practice. Advanced theoretical studies and individual practical investigations are used to support an emerging independent work process culminating in a final body of work.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:361-362.
Learning Goals of Course:

  • To develop a level of criticality when looking at images that considers historical, cultural, and theoretical issues related to photography, art in general and culture at large.
  • To develop analytical and critical skills in visual, verbal, and written form as they relate to the understanding, discussion, description, and evaluation of images.
  • To examine context as a basis for our understanding of material culture

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: All students must turn in a final selection of work (from the entire year) or equivalent in another medium, plus Artists Statement on the last day of Class.

Grading is based on the instructor’s assessment of individual development over the course of the semester. I am interested in the degree to which you are willing to push yourself in the studio and by the challenges you set up for yourself, the risks you take, the commitment to your work and general studio activity.

Class participation during critiques and discussions is expected and is factored into your grade. If you make exceptional work in the studio that would otherwise constitute an “A” grade but never contribute to the group critiques, you will not receive an “A” in this class. The over all breakdown of your grade is as follows:

  • 50% Final body of work, includes the production of new work
  • 50% Class participation, involvement, Group Crits, etc.
  • A = exceptional engagement with production of work, readings, and class participation
  • B=thoughtful completion of work and active participation in class discussions
  • C=adequate completion of work and average participation in discussions
  • D=lack of thought and effort evident in work and participation
  • F=none of the above

Attendance & Participation

  • Three unexcused absences equal failure
  • Two times late equals one absence.
  • Class participation in critiques and discussions is required
  • Completion of weekly assignments and Final Project

Instructor: Miranda Lichtenstein, mlichtenstein@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:463 Advanced Photography A

Advanced Photography A

Course Number: 07:081:463
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Projects in this special topics class concentrate on the approach to specialized development in photography areas such as artists books, multimedia approaches, performance, installation, and photography-based public art. Individual and group work includes research and short- and long-term project development.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:461-462.
Learning Goals of Course:

  • To develop a level of criticality when looking at images that considers historical, cultural, and theoretical issues related to photography, art in general and culture at large.
  • To develop analytical and critical skills in visual, verbal, and written form as they relate to the understanding, discussion, description, and evaluation of images.
  • To examine context as a basis for our understanding of material culture
  • All students must turn in a final selection of work (from the entire year) or equivalent in another medium, plus Artists Statement on the last day of Class.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading is based on my assessment of your individual development over the course of the semester. I am interested in the degree to which you are willing to push yourself in the studio and by the challenges you set up for yourself, the risks you take, the commitment to your work and general studio activity.

Class participation during critiques and discussions is expected and is factored into your grade. If you make exceptional work in the studio that would otherwise constitute an “A” grade but never contribute to the group critiques, you will not receive an “A” in this class.

The overall breakdown of your grade is as follows:

  • 50% Final body of work, includes the production of new work
  • 50% Class participation, involvement, Group Crits, etc.
  • A= exceptional engagement with production of work, readings, and class participation
  • B=thoughtful completion of work and active participation in class discussions
  • C=adequate completion of work and average participation in discussions
  • D=lack of thought and effort evident in work and participation
  • F=none of the above

Attendance & Participation:

  • Three unexcused absences equal failure
  • Two times late equals one absence.
  • Class participation in critiques and discussions is required.
  • Completion of weekly assignments and Final Project

Instructor: Miranda Lichtenstein, mlichtenstein@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:471 Print III-A

Print III-A: Letterpress

Course Number: 07:081:471

In-depth focus on letterpress including hand typesetting and polymer plates on the Vandercook press. The course will cover broadsides, artists’ books, and chap books. Artistic development concerning composition, content, and conceptual ideas will be addressed through individual and group critiques.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:081:481 Sculpture III-A

Sculpture III-A

Course Number: 07:081:481
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In this advanced studio course, students will explore, define, and develop their creative work and research in expanded sculptural practices through studio assignments and prompts, writing, readings and independent projects. Students in this course will continue the development of their studio practice and understanding of how their work is situated historically, and discursively in the field through lectures, readings, and group and individual critiques.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites: 07:081:381-382
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge and skills to:

  • Create large-scale, self-directed projects
  • Synthesize research, concepts, and techniques into new studio work
  • Integrate research and understandings of one’s practice into contemporary art and related fields of inquiry
  • Explain their motivations and interests in the development of new work during critiques, in project proposals and possibly toward their Thesis presentations
  • Synthesize studio work into professional pursuits

Instructor: Jeanine Oleson, jeanine.oleson@rutgers.edu

07:081:483 Advanced Sculpture A

Advanced Sculpture A

Course Number: 07:081:483
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students in this course will work on independently conceived sculpture projects which are developed in consultation with the instructor. Independent research and creative work is supported by group critiques, individual meetings with the instructors, lectures, readings and class discussions.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre/Co-requisite: 07:081:481
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge and skills to:

  • Create and execute large-scale, self-directed projects
  • Synthesize research, concepts, and techniques into proposals and new studio work
  • Integrate research and understandings of one’s practice into contemporary art and related fields of inquiry
  • Explain their motivations and interests in in the development of new work during critiques, in project proposals and possibly toward their Thesis presentations
  • Synthesize studio work into professional pursuits

Instructor: Jeanine Oleson, jeanine.oleson@rutgers.edu

07:081:497 Thesis & Exhibition A

Thesis & Exhibition A

Course Number: 07:081:497
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The culmination of undergraduate Art & Design creative research and practice, this year-long course provides methodologies, structure and community to pursue advanced independent studio work and critique, leading to a group exhibition in the second semester. This year-long course is required for the B.F.A. in Visual Art and B.F.A. in Design degrees.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA Seniors
Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will possess the knowledge and skills to:

  • Develop a coherent body of work that addresses individual formal and conceptual concerns
  • Situate their work within a material, historical, and contemporary context; to defend the work orally and in writing
  • Present their work professionally both in process/for studio visits and completed/for exhibition.

Graduate Courses

08:081:521 Visiting Artist

Visiting Artist

Course Number: 08:081:521

This is a required course for both the fall and spring semesters for first-year graduate students. It features weekly presentations and lectures from noted artists, critics, and curators invited to the school. Each student will participate in a limited number of individual studio visits with invited guest presenters. At the end of the first and second semesters, the faculty conducts a review, where the students present their work for critique. The first-year review takes the form of a critique of work exhibited in the First-Year Graduate Student Exhibition, usually scheduled from mid-November to December of the first semester in the Mason Gross Galleries. A one-page artist statement is required for this review. An individual studio review is at the end of the second semester. A one-page artist statement is required for this review as well.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:525 Research Projects

Research Projects

Course Number: 08:081:525

Individual project proposed by student to faculty member of his or her choice; faculty member who approves the project then acts as its adviser.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:625 Research Projects

Research Projects

Course Number: 08:081:625

Individual project proposed by student to faculty member of his or her own choice; faculty member who approves the project then acts as its adviser.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:675 Graduate Seminar

Graduate Seminar

Course Number: 08:081:675

This course will center around Myth, Rhythm, and Place as foundational conditions and sources of agency for creative production. We will center these conditions through the works of Audre Lorde and Frantz Fanon. Audre Lorde, the self-described “black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet,” was and remains to be one of the most important voices in black radical feminist critique. Her poetry and critical work have been foundational and formative in shaping contemporary progressive ideas around race, sex, gender, police brutality, intimacy, and agency. Frantz Fanon was a writer, psychiatrist, and revolutionary who used both his research and his lived experience to deconstruct the internal and external relationships between race and imperialism, individual and collective agency and to (much like Lorde) interrogate the boundaries between love and violence.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:676 Graduate Seminar

Graduate Seminar

Course Number: 08:081:676

Following ideas of transmission that are material, linguistic, and affectual, this seminar will be making/reading/thinking/talking through the present moment. What are the interfaces and material potentials for creative action during a large-scale shift? How do technology and ongoing issues of access inflect how and for who these shifts are occurring? How does one make anything under these conditions? What productive methods for thinking about space and time exist through changing ideas of materiality, site, place, and objects? Working through these questions of how and where transmissions are occurring in the world and for whom will form the critical-ethical basis of our work together in this seminar alongside your ongoing studio practice. 

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:677 Nature, Territory, Identity: From White Geology to Dark Ecology (Graduate Seminar)

Nature, Territory, Identity: From White Geology to Dark Ecology (Graduate Seminar)

Course Number: 08:081:677
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Thinking through the on-going effects of colonialism, industrialization/globalization, and current political ideologies as they shape and demarcate life, death, and non-life, this course explores how nature, territory, and identity are always entangled, especially in questions of who and what comes to matter. The readings in this class explore colonial history, the appropriation of ecological rhetoric by eco-fascism and white nationalism, and new critical articulations of what we call Nature and Landscape through the lenses of queer theory, intersectional feminism, object-oriented ontology, and black critical studies. Authors include Kathryn Yusoff, Edouard Glissant, Max Liboiron, Fred Moten, Donna Haraway, Timothy Morton, Bruno Latour, Karen Barrad, Elizabeth Povinelli, among others. The seminar is structured around weekly readings and discussions, one-hour individual studio meetings, one-hour and twenty-minute group critiques for each student.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: For MFA graduate students in Art & Design

Learning Goals of Course:

  • To gain a broad understanding of the ideas, terms, and figures that surround debates around critical understandings of the anthropocene, and new formulations of ecology.
  • To gain a broad understanding of how identitarian politics, and social forces are deeply connected to concepts of nature and landscape
  • To intellectually and materially explore how the critical and philosophical ideas in the readings relate to one’s independent studio work and research.
  • To broaden one’s historical, theoretical and contextual understanding of art and aesthetic production.
  • To develop and deepen one’s ability to experience, analyze, and assess art.
  • To artistically respond to the pertinent criticisms, questions and suggestions raised in individual meetings, and group critiques.
  • To analyze the work and presentations of peers through description, reflection, questions, and suggestions in the evaluation of the works content, function, problems, references, and contexts.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Key readings will be provided to all enrolled students.

Instructor: Marc Handelman, marcha@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:678 Graduate Seminar

Graduate Seminar

Course Number: 08:081:678
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course is a place where we will collectivley create a generous space and place within which to unpack our work, ideas, perspectives, goals and intentions within a supportive environment. Readings, discussions, screenings, and field trips are focused on a topic (recent seminar themes were “Landscape as Metaphor” and “Color!”) but are not media specific. Graduate MFA students from all disciplinary backgrounds are welcome. The course is structured around bi-weekly group and/or individual critiques/discussions that will follow the trajectory of the work being made in the studio and based on the needs of each individual artist.

4 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of this course, students will:

  • Develop, expand, experiment, and clarify their own ideas and goals as artists as demonstrated in a body of work
  • Be able to contextualize their work in relation to histories and contemporary culture
  • Demonstrate an ability to examine their work and the work of others in regards to: formal issues; process; materiality; technical aspects/technique; subject; issues of content/meaning; intentionality; narrative, etc., as they relate to the specific work of each student

Instructor: Julie Langsam, jlangsam@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:679 Graduate Seminar

Graduate Seminar

Course Number: 08:081:679

This course will provide a setting for group critique and feedback on both first- and second-year artists’ work, along with an examination of the process of group critique itself. We will develop insight into how different media, relation to time, and shifting thematic content will alter the group reception of the work.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Instructor: Jeanine Oleson, jeanine.oleson@rutgers.edu

08:081:680 Graduate Seminar

Graduate Seminar

Course Number: 08:081:680

This course will be composed of group discussion of a selection of new books including: Andre Brock Jr: Distributed Blackness and Legacy, Russell: Glitch Feminism, with the possibility of additional selections or short essays. In addition, this will be a space for individual studio visits, group critique of works in progress, and shared reading. This course is open to all graduate M.F.A. students regardless of media. It is a site for one-on-one and group discussions of philosophical and procedural problems related to your studio practice, informed by an approach I have developed through practice as a visiting critic, curator, artist, teacher, producer, and consumer of media and other cultural forms. Some structural elements of the course may be modified depending on the size of the class. The instructor’s role will largely be that of a facilitator, and new formats for critique may arise from the class.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:081:704 Exhibition

Exhibition

Course Number: 08:081:704

The exhibition is a presentation of two years of creative work in the program. It takes place during the final spring semester in the Mason Gross Galleries. A student’s exhibit is subject to committee review, consultation, and evaluation by the thesis committee and other members of the graduate faculty.

4 credits

Instructor: Barbara Madsen, bmadsen@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:516 Research Methods

Research Methods

Course Number: 08:208:516
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course introduces students to the research methods for informing and stimulating the design process and familiarizes students with hands-on practices such as visualization, digital humanities, crowdsourcing, field studies, interviews, physical sensing, polls, cartography and mapping. Readings and references will shed light on major debates in epistemology, including those over the structure of knowledge, genealogy, classification, and meta-epistemological issues in the digital age.

4 credits

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Build and use a bibliography for a subject-specific design research project
  • Demonstrate the ability to conduct research in a subject-specific realm and draw a contextual framework
  • Identify research potentials in archives, evaluate visualization strategies, and develop design ideas

Instructor: Atif Akin, aakin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:517 Design Studio 1

Design Studio 1

Course Number: 08:208:517
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Provides methodologies, structure and community for developing visual work in the MFA in Design. Precedents in design, art, and media along with readings and class discussion will inform a greater understanding of established design structures. Independent studio work and critiques will develop an individual creative response to those structures.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Use tools, methods and materials of research-driven design to create self-initiated work
  • Examine varied working models and methods of contemporary design

Instructor: Mindy Seu, mseu@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:518 Design Seminar: Theory

Design Seminar: Theory

Course Number: 08:208:518
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

A topics-driven seminar focused on critical issues in design theory. Departing from basic semiotic studies, this seminar examines a series of design discourses that are the direct outgrowth of related social, economic and technological histories. Students develop writing skills, in preparation for thesis writing.

4 credits

Instructor: Gerry Beegan, gbeegan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:532 Web Projects

Web Projects

Course Number: 08:208:532
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Through technical tutorials, studio projects, readings, discussions, and field trips, this class introduces an expansive view of online publishing. A deep immersion in making work for, of, and about the internet.

4 credits

08:208:533 Design Studio 2

Design Studio 2

Course Number: 08:208:533
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Builds upon the theoretical discussions on producing knowledge in the Research Methods course, this studio will facilitate studio projects based on the research ideas undertaken in that previous course. With the overarching theme of visualization, the studio projects span across three different scales and media: screen, architectural space, and print.

4 credits

Instructor: Atif Akin, aakin@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:534 Design Seminar: Contemporary Practice

Design Seminar: Contemporary Practice

Course Number: 08:208:534
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Proposes diverse models for contemporary design practice through lectures by guest designers and related readings. Class discussions, readings, and writing responses address the pragmatics of design, the designer’s role as a social agent, and design and politics. Helps students to situate their own research and develop a critical design language to analyze their own and others’ work.

4 credits

Instructor: Gerry Beegan, gbeegan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:616 Thesis I

Thesis I

Course Number: 08:208:616
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course is a methodical analysis of a series of research questions based in the domains of art, design or technology. It establishes the process and method for proposing solutions, creating prototypes, and offering a conclusion through production of a series of independenlty derrived works. This course provides the framework to support exploration of a specific field of knowledge using design methodologies; empowers students to use tools of investigation, analysis and synthesis within their design process; and prepares students to cultivate a research-driven design studio practice.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: This course is intended for BFA thesis students in their final year of study.

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Formulate research questions emerging from chosen methodologies and subject matter
  • Analyze and articulate research findings
  • Propose design explorations that address research-driven questions
  • Create prototypes of design solutions that evidence originality and experimentation
  • Observe, analyze and synthesize design outcomes
  • Create and deliver presentations that explain the context and results of the prototyping cycle

Instructor: Jacqueline Thaw, thaw@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:617 Design Studio 3

Design Studio 3

Course Number: 08:208:617
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This studio course guides students in undertaking a self-initiated, research-driven design project in collaboration with another academic department or unit at Rutgers University or beyond. Students will explore and apply various visual communication techniques to realize their collaborative projects. Alongside their peers, they will compare the impact of their work in different fields of knowledge.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will possess the skills and knowledge to:

  • Engage in cross-disciplinary research and discussion
  • Identify and deploy appropriate visual communication techniques
  • Develop design projects in an interdisciplinary environment
  • Produce a project in collaboration with a research body across disciplines
  • Compare and understand the impact of their work in different academic environments

Instructor: Jacqueline Thaw, thaw@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:619 Publication and Display

Publication and Display

Course Number: 08:208:619
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Explores the methodologies of display and publication strategies. Students formulate varied ways in which design ideas and artifacts can be presented in a public setting. The course focuses on the modalities of display in online and print media as well as installation in public and gallery spaces.

4 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Critically evaluate a wide range of publication and display approaches employed in contemporary design practice
  • Make their work public in online, print, and installation formats
  • Make informed decisions about which display strategies to employ in a particular context
  • Engage with new ways of publishing design work
08:208:632 Thesis 2

Thesis 2

Course Number: 08:208:632
Course Format: Seminar
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students reflect on, frame critically and write about their work, further honing their individual design approach. This course supports the development of the MFA Design student’s thesis exhibition and panel presentation. The course prepares students to make their thesis project public, evidencing originality, experimentation, critical and independent thinking, effective display and thorough documentation.

4 credits

Instructor: Gerry Beegan, gbeegan@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:208:633 Design Studio 4

Design Studio 4

Course Number: 08:208:633
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Challenging and developing the student’s advanced design skills, this course provides a studio environment and production guidance for students to actualize and complete the MFA Design thesis project, a large-scale research-driven work, displayed in the Design Thesis Exhibition.

4 credits