Dance

Courses

Undergraduate Courses

07:203:101 Dance Appreciation

Dance Appreciation

Course Number: 07:203:101
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Dance Appreciation is an introduction to dance as an art form, wherein students study the historical, cultural, social, and performative contexts of diverse dance forms. Students engage with aesthetic, theoretical, and scholarly discourses aimed at illuminating how dance functions as a form of communication and personal, aesthetic expression. In addition, students explore the ways in which dance both reflects and comments upon contemporary society. Students develop fundamental dance literacy through critical analysis of dance in live and recorded formats; identify aesthetic concepts and ideas through written and visual media; demonstrate comprehension in their utilization of dance vocabulary and terminology; discuss influential choreographers and genres of dance; and articulate critical conclusions about the reciprocal relationship between dance, the arts, and societal concerns.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Develop the ability to perceive, analyze, describe, discuss, appreciate and understand dance as an art form across cultures and forms
  • Identify and discuss the social, cultural, and historical contexts of diverse dance forms
  • Define and describe the elements of dance composition.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of influential choreographers and eras of dance.
  • Articulate dance terminology and aesthetic concepts through both written and kinesthetic formats.
  • Refine critical analytical skills through viewing dance in live and recorded formats and presenting ideas through written assignments.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students must have access to a computer with internet and email capability. Access to the internet and the ability to send and receive email is essential to participation in this course. Students must have a functional Rutgers email account that is accessible daily.

Instructor: Stephen O’Connell, soconnell@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:110 Street and Club Dances (Intro. Urban Fusion)

Street and Club Dances (Intro. Urban Fusion)

Course Number: 07:203:110
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course will focus on facilitating the embodiment of different forms of urban dance practices. This will be accomplished through exploring the music, dance vernacular, historical context, cultural influences, and aesthetic identity of each urban dance technique. Dancing will be at the core of this course through practicing technique, choreography, improvisation, and creating original work. Students will also connect to the dance practices through reflection papers to help clarify the ways that dance can be used to build not only local communities, but global networks. Classes will begin with warm up followed by exploring a dance technique through exercises and choreography.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Open to all undergraduate majors at Rutgers
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

  • After the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Comprehend and vocalize how different urban dance practices are a manifestation of embodied cultural diversity.
  • Recognize and demonstrate specific techniques, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in urban dance vernacular.
  • Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of urban dance and its relationships to other forms of dance.
  • Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of urban dance.
  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in urban dance.
  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry and communal participation as appropriate to urban dance practices.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Class Participation and performance = engagement, effort, energy and embodiment of choreographic, cultural, and artistic concepts
  • Journal reflections and observations
  • Midterm assignment
  • Final in studio assignment
  • Final paper

Instructor: Elias Kababa, ek826@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:115 Intro. Dance Studies

Intro. Dance Studies

Course Number: 07:203:115
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to the domain of dance practice and theoretical frameworks, within a humanities context that acknowledges the intersection of multiple intelligences. Students observe and describe dance as a performing art and as cultural intervention. Guest artists provide performance demonstrations on a variety of topics including race/ethnicity, gender/sexuality, disability studies, screendance technology, and sound/lighting/costume design, among others. Descriptive and analytic writing required.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: Open only to BA, BFA dance majors and minors.
Course Corequisites:
Learning Goals of Course:

At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize physical, production, and sociocultural elements of dance and choreography.
  • Infer a choreographer’s creative intent through analysis into the dance’s distinct elements and their intersections.
  • Compare, contrast, and contextualize a variety of choreographic intents in diverse dance works.
  • Analyze a dance’s elements to differentiate, organize, and interpret choreographic intents within diverse frames of reference.
  • Critically attribute choreographic meaning to dance works, using relevant vocabulary and analytic categories that illuminate diverse frameworks.
  • Address diversity, equity, inclusion, and access and their intersections with dance.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: This course is designed to develop students’ appreciation for dance – the art of human movement – as a culturally embedded and responsive form. This course will develop the students’ ability to perceive, describe, analyze, discuss, interpret, and understand dance as an art form and as political agent. In doing so, this course will develop students’ ability to recognize both choreographic intent and audience interpretation. Descriptive and analytic writing required. Guest artists play an important role by introducing students to diverse forms of dance through live performance and interaction in an informal situation that encourages dialogue and discussion.

Instructors:
Jeff Friedman, jfdance@mgsa.rutgers.edu
Alexx Shilling, as3973@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:123 Modern Dance 1

Modern Dance 1

Course Number: 07:203:123
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to the fundamentals of movement skills and body awareness in modern dance technique, improvisation, and composition.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Required course for BA dance majors and minors. Open to non-majors.

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will able to expand their leaning through the following facets:

  • Physical: Understand, self-evaluate and demonstrate the fundamental principles of proper alignment and body awareness through technical proficiency. Demonstrate modern dance combinations with expressiveness, effort, and phrasing.
  • Theory: Communicate their experiences of watching dance performances using movement vocabulary inherited throughout the progression of the course.
  • Values: Reflect on the cultural values of the dance style, as well as one’s own personal life experiences.
  • Self: Produce creative and unique vocabulary in their own individual movement styles.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students must wear appropriate clothing which is moveable and unrestrictive. Clothing must allow the joints to be seen, or for warmth at the beginning of class. Students will be dancing in bare feet.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: 

  • Daily Class Performance
  • Midterm Performance Exam
  • Self Portrait Score/Solo
  • Live Performance Critique

Instructor: Heather Favretto, classich@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:124 Modern Dance 2

Modern Dance 2

Course Number: 07:203:124
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Continued development of level 1 skills in modern dance technique. The student will actively engage in foundational movement in modern dance including but not limited to strength training, musculature development, injury prevention, and body-mind awareness.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:203:123 or permission of the department​
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Through this course, students will:

  • Develop both an understanding of and sensitivity to dance as means of human expression.
  • Participate in technical training to develop awareness of alignment, increase range of motion and strength.
  • Increase kinesthetic awareness.
  • Actively engage in technical training to introduce the understanding of elements of dance, qualities of motion and movement principals.
  • Participate in locomotion movement patterns designed to increase focus and directional/spatial awareness.
  • Understand partner and group dynamics as they relate to movement exploration.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Participation: attendance, work ethic, progress, and attitude
  • Live Performance Critique Paper

Instructor: Heather Favretto, classich@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:131 Dance Appreciation Online

Dance Appreciation Online

Course Number: 07:203:131
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Dance Appreciation Online is an introduction to dance as an art form, wherein students study the historical, cultural, social and performative contexts of diverse dance forms. Students engage with aesthetic, theoretical, and scholarly discourses aimed at illuminating how dance functions as a form of communication and personal, aesthetic expression. In addition, students explore the ways in which dance both reflects and comments upon contemporary society. Students develop fundamental dance literacy through critical analysis of dance in live and recorded formats; identify aesthetic concepts and ideas through written and visual media; demonstrate comprehension in their utilization of dance vocabulary and terminology; discuss influential choreographers and genres of dance; and articulate critical conclusions about the reciprocal relationship between dance, the arts and societal concerns.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course
Course Learning Objectives:

  • To develop the ability to perceive, analyze, describe, discuss, and understand dance as an art form across cultures and forms.
  • To identify and discuss the social, cultural, and historical contexts of diverse dance forms.
  • To define and describe the elements of dance composition.
  • To demonstrate knowledge of influential choreographers and eras of dance.
  • To articulate dance terminology and aesthetic concepts through both written and kinesthetic formats.
  • To refine critical analytical skills through viewing dance in live and recorded formats and presenting ideas in written and visual media.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Lecture Content: You must prepare the online lecture content for every course. This is your means of "attending" the course and your best opportunity for achieving the course learning goals.

Reading: Moderate - In order to complete the assessment components of the course, including threaded discussions, writing assignments, exams and the final project, you need to complete all assigned readings each week.

Videos: Heavy - Material from the videos will be included in the exams. It is essential that you watch all videos from start to finish, for exam content and for ideas for building your final project. You will not be able to successfully complete this course if you do not complete all video viewing.

Assignments and activities for the course (1000 points). For each assignment, check the Rubric in your ASSIGNMENT DUE DATES & RUBRICS Module for detailed grading criteria.

  • “I Understand” Quiz: Checks understanding of course logistics and expectations. Details in course content. (40 points)
  • "Your Move" (Introduction): You get 30 points for introducing yourself to the class!
  • "Your Move" (Threaded Discussions): There are 3 "Your Move" discussion assignments. (30 points each)
  • Quick Quizzes: There are 4 quick quizzes to check for content knowledge. (50 points each)
  • Dance Video Analysis: There are 2 dance video analysis assignments. (The first is worth 50 points; the second is worth 100 points.)
  • Cultural Response Assignments: There are 2 cultural response assignments. (100 points each)
  • Respondus Set Up for Exam 1 (30 points)
  • Exams: 2 Multiple Choice Exams (130 points each)

Instructors: Darrah Carr, dacarr@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Kathleen Flynn Gavin, katfly@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Stephen O'Connell, soconnell@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:132 History of Broadway Dance Online

History of Broadway Dance Online

Course Number: 07:203:132
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Explores the evolution of dance in musical theater and on Broadway. Course topics will include a historical survey of dance on Broadway; an examination of the reciprocal relationship of Broadway dance to economic and cultural change; and a close look at the power structure and organization of Broadway musicals. The evolution of Broadway dance steps and styles and the contribution of notable dancers will be examined.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Organize Broadway dance and musical theatre on a timeline of relevant historical and economic issues.
  • Compare Broadway dances across decades to understand the evolution of Broadway dance through history.
  • Understand the reciprocal relationship of culture and the arts, specifically culture and dance.
  • Recognize notable Broadway choreographers and be able to evaluate each choreographer’s specific contributions to Broadway dance and musical theatre history.
  • Analyze Broadway dance choreography to differentiate historical, cultural and artistic components.
  • View, evaluate and critique Broadway dance using formalistic/artistic properties and from the perspective of an informed audience.
  • Articulate written evaluations and critiques of Broadway dance using domain specific language.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Assignments (Total of 900 points):

  • “I Understand” Word Doc Submission – 40 points
  • Class Discussion (5) – 150 points (30 points each)
  • Journal Entries (3) – 90 points (30 points each)
  • Dance Video Analysis - Form (2) – 80 points (40 per assignment)
  • Broadway Dance Video Analysis (3) – 150 points (50 per assignment)
  • Written Responses (6) – 240 (40 points each)
  • Includes 2 "Get Up and Dance" options to replace Written Responses.
  • Peer Review of Final Presentation – 30 points
  • Broadway Analysis Presentation - Rough Draft - 20 points
  • Broadway Analysis Final Presentation – 100 points

Instructor: Andrew Greenspan, ag1224@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:133 Dance in Istanbul Online

Dance in Istanbul Online

Course Number: 07:203:133
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

An overview of dance in Istanbul from the 16th century to the present including the implications of modernity, gender, state, and religion on dance forms, with a brief summary of debates regarding the dancing body in Turkish Islamic culture. Belly dance will be explored using different points of view within the contexts of Orientalism, feminism, and exoticism. Dances in religious rituals and sacred ceremonies of the present day will be examined through text and video.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able:

  • To develop an understanding of the relationships between dance and history, dance, and society.
  • To apply concepts of sociology and the social sciences to dance.
  • To give attention to the discursive articulations that embody every dance practice.
  • To improve awareness of the cognitive and intellectual discourse of dance, including the understanding between choreographers, dancers, and audiences.
  • To learn perceptions of dancing in Turkish-Islamic culture.
  • To understand the role of gender in dancer identity and dance forms in the classical age of the Ottoman Empire.
  • To appreciate the role of dance in the rituals of Sunni, Mevlevis, and the ceremonies of Shia Alevis.
  • To analyze belly dance in relation to the concepts of gender, Orientalism, and exoticism.
  • To understand the ramifications of the concept of ‘modernity’ behind the introduction of Western dance forms to Turkey.
  • To evaluate the main influences of democracy and civil society behind the motives for the development of the contemporary dance scene in Istanbul.

CORE Curriculum Learning Goals met by this Course: (AH o and p)

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Grading is based on the assignments:

  • Midterm - 12.5%
  • Compare and contrast essay - 10%
  • Final project - 20%
  • Writing assignments - 31.5%
  • Discussion board - 23%
  • I understand quiz 2%

Instructor: Ayrin Ersoz, ae206@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:134 Dance in Israel Online

Dance in Israel Online

Course Number: 07:203:134
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Survey of Israel's concert dance history, from roots in imported styles in the pre- and immediate post-state decades to the blossoming of a homegrown Israeli contemporary dance within the last few decades. Topics include aesthetic influences, significant artists, and recent innovations, with discussions about technical, stylistic, and thematic concerns. Throughout the course, dance is situated within a larger historical, sociopolitical context, and connections to politics, nationalism, religion, ethnicity, and culture are considered.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Learning Objectives/Outcomes
By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read and critically analyze dance as an art form
  • Understand how dance in Israel developed in relation to historical and cultural developments
  • Recognize aesthetic and ideological influences and representations in Israeli choreography
  • Be familiar with key choreographers and their work and contribution
  • Analyze and identify various dance genres and styles in their cultural and aesthetic contexts
  • Comprehend cultural and social theoretical terms in relation to dance analysis

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Assignments are expected to be turned into Canvas by the assigned due date. Technology failures may not be accepted as reason for missed assignment due dates. Therefore, do not leave anything to the last minute. Back up files frequently and in various locations so work is not lost. It is the student’s responsibility to alert the instructor of a technology issue immediately so that the instructor can identify alternative ways to complete or submit an assignment.

Survey of assignments types:

  • (1%) Confirming e-mail: 10 points
  • (51.5%) Dance Analysis: Short written essays (x18): 515 points
  • (4%) Dance Analysis: Online group discussion (x2): 40 points
  • (6%) Image Analysis: Short written essays (x3): 60 points
  • (8 %) Content Analysis: Short written essays (x3):80 points
  • (5%) Personal Reflection: Short written/visual essays (x2): 50 points
  • (6.5%) Other: Reconstructing a short dance; Curating an exhibition; Creating a photo of Tableau Vivant (x3): 65 points
  • (18%) Final Assignment: Dance Analysis: Long Essay: 180 points (1200-1500 words, with a minimum of 10 in-text citations from this unit's bibliographic references. MLA or Chicago style guide for formatting).

Instructor: Yael Nativ, ynativ@mgsa.rutgers.edu; Iris Lana, ilana@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:135 Dance Forms of Africa Online

Dance Forms of Africa Online

Course Number: 07:203:135
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Explores dance forms from different cultures in different blocks on the African continent. Through readings, viewings, and engagement with movement, students use skills of observation, movement learning, and contextual and comparative analysis, focusing on the social, cultural, religious, and political significance of African dance forms. Types and functions of traditional African dances, contexts of performance, and their unique characteristics will also be explored.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: The purpose of this course is to develop awareness, understanding and appreciation of African dance forms to include their histories, socio-cultural functions, and cultural meanings. The primary focus is to offer students an opportunity to gain knowledge about African dance cultures by providing a lens for understanding social/cultural values, norms, and beliefs, as we consider how these elements are reflected in the dances of various African tribal groups. Through readings, viewings, and engagement with dance, students will develop the awareness that one has a view of the world that is not universally shared.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Understand the close relationship between African music and dance, and how that shapes African dance performances.
  • Develop awareness that one has a view of the world that is not universally shared. Demonstrate an understanding of how dance contributes to ‘community building’ and the maintenance of African traditions and culture.
  • Discuss how African dances are shaped by the history, cultural and social values, and beliefs of the people. Discuss how a person’s socio-cultural location is related to aesthetic preferences and movement choices.
  • Critically evaluate African dance forms on the basis of their peculiar characteristics and from the perspective of an informed audience.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

Course Assignments:

  • Analysis Paper: Students will be required to write a two-page analysis paper based on specific reading assignments. Instructions /guidelines for this paper will be provided.
  • Midterm Research Project: Students will conduct research on a festival from the African country they choose to be identified with at the beginning of the semester, and present their findings in a blog.
  • Synthesis Paper: Students will write a three-page synthesis paper based on readings, viewings, and class discussions. Instructions /guidelines for this paper will be provided.
  • Research Project: This project is a ‘salad bowl.’ Students will be drawing from assignments two and three, as well as conduct a little research to ‘garnish’ the project. Prompts will be provided, and project will be presented in a blog.
  • Weekly Discussions: Weekly readings will be assigned in each unit, and students will respond to specific prompts from the instructor. These responses will serve as the basis for our weekly class discussions.

Course Grading:

  • Analysis Paper -10%
  • Midterm Research Project - 20%
  • Synthesis Paper -12%
  • Final Research Project - 25%
  • Student Journal Entries - 11%
  • Weekly Discussion board - 22%.

Instructor: Beatrice T. Ayi, ba253@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:136 Dance in India Online

Dance in India Online

Course Number: 07:203:136
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

Covers a wide range of forms practiced in India in the 20th and 21st century, including folk dances, classical dance styles, contemporary choreography, and film dances, among others. Also looks beyond India, into the diaspora and global contexts in which Indian dance forms are practiced. Methods include analysis of readings, video documentaries, dance films, and interviews, as well as concept mapping. Practical engagement with movement material and aesthetic principles included.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:The goal of this course is to critically introduce students to a wide variety of dance forms coexisting in India today, through analysis of readings, videos (dance, documentaries and interviews) and some practical engagement. The students should gain the ability to distinguish and critically discuss select dance forms from India in terms of the categorizations of dance genres/forms and an understanding of the interconnections of historical, dance historical and aesthetic developments as well as questions of cultural identity. Further, students shall become attentive to migrations and trans- and intercultural entanglements in the context of dance in India, i.e. the ways in which the dances, dance forms, aesthetic influences and contents can move to different geographical areas, different contexts, different populations and thereby change and attain new meanings.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  • Identify and distinguish select dance forms from the subcontinent in relation to categorizations such as traditional, classical, folk, tribal, contemporary, modern, and film dance, as well as name important exponents or choreographers of specific forms, where applicable.
  • Articulate a critical working knowledge of the categories traditional, classical, folk, modern, contemporary, and film dance.
    Recognize and communicate basic aesthetic elements and principles of classical Indian dance (relating to rhythm, storytelling, and ‘expression’).
  • Discuss and analyze selected creative and choreographic approaches to modern and contemporary Indian dance, using thick description and basic methods of choreographic analysis
  • Critically analyze and articulate selected Indian dance forms in relation to questions of history (e.g. colonialism) and cultural identity.
  • Formulate and express distinctions in select dance forms from the subcontinent in the context of migrations (e.g.: classical dance in the diaspora, Bhangra in UK, Bollywood live dance across the world, the dance of the Sidi-Goma in India)
  • Communicate competent analysis of written materials and documentaries/interviews in relation to dance, as well as video-recordings of dances.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Grading is based on assignments, a midterm, and a long final essay.

Final Grade Calculation

  • 67.5% Assignments (keywords, blog/journal, practical, dance analyses)
  • 12.5% Midterm
  • 20% Final

Instructor: Sandra Chatterjee, schatterjee@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:149 Ballet 1

Ballet 1

Course Number: 07:203:149
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to ballet as an art form with an emphasis on traditional steps.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Students will apply correct body alignment and posture to ballet techniques and performing fundamental ballet conditioning exercises including correct breathing and turnout. They will recognize and apply ballet terminology as well as properly execute basic exercises of the ballet barre and center. Students will develop a sense of artistic expression as well as improved skill and strength.

Instructor: Paul Ocampo

07:203:150 Ballet 2

Ballet 2

Course Number: 07:203:150
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course is a structured ballet class with barrework, center floor components, and traveling movements across the floor. The emphasis will be on expanding the practice and principles of the classical ballet vocabulary. Students will be expected to develop and demonstrate the movements with intentionality to proper body alignment and a sense of artistic expression as well as improved skill and strength.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:203:149 or permission of the department
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand and self-evaluate the fundamental principles of proper alignment and body awareness as it pertains to ballet. Using ballet exercises that facilitate strength and flexibility to prepare for more complex work, emphasis will be on basic alignment, using an appropriate degree of rotation for personal body structure, engagement of the core muscles, proper use of weight both in centering and transferring weight, isolation of body parts to work particular muscles and the coordination of multiple body parts to integrate movement from multiple areas of the body, and execute exercises that facilitate continued growth of strength and flexibility.
  • Execute movement phrases and exercises with additional elements when appropriate speed, control, stamina, and energy.
  • Recall, differentiate, and demonstrate ballet terminology (barre movements, epaulment, and basic directions of the body, varying en tournant, allegro movements, spatial directions, stage directions).  Comprehend the format of a ballet class and the purpose of each exercise in the progression of the class.  Comprehend the meaning of French ballet terminology translation.
  • Approach movement with a developing sense of artistry, character, and intention.
  • Participate in discussion regarding ballet’s historical and cultural context as well as develop an understanding of where ballet fits in the dance field today.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Daily participation, performance, self-application, online discussion boards
  • Written terminology exams
  • Performance critique assignment

Instructor: Peggy Petteway

07:203:155 Intro. Jazz Dance

Intro. Jazz Dance

Course Number: 07:203:155
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face​

Students will participate in center warmups, center exercises, and movement combinations across the floor. Jazz history and terminology will be emphasized in the course through written and verbal means of communication. The course will focus on learning the correct body alignment based on jazz dance’s anatomical principles, and the student will be able to demonstrate introductory level jazz dance movement adequately.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Open major/unit 203, 206, 207
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

As a result of class participation and successful completion of course assignments:

  • Through active participation in class warm-up, center combinations, across the floor, and given choreography along with online discussions and midterm and final juries, students will analyze and demonstrate movement through their acquired knowledge of jazz technique.
  • Through attendance and active participation in online and studio environments, students will demonstrate their understanding of jazz terminology and style while also contextualizing jazz dance through a historical lens in written and verbal discussions.
  • Through attendance and online and in-class coursework, students will demonstrate personal artistry by how they approach their performance and execution of jazz dance technique and show appreciation for jazz dance history that helps contextualize dance as a performative art.
  • Through participation in online and studio environments, students will demonstrate their comprehension of jazz as a dance style.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Classroom Work – Attending class promptly and regularly is essential to comprehension of the material offered in this course.
  • Midterm performance exam and self reflective essay
  • Final performance exam and self reflective essay
  • Online discussion posts
  • Journal reflections

Instructor: Aimee Mittachione

07:203:160 Pilates Mat

Pilates Mat

Course Number: 07:203:160
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

This course will cover the Pilates Mat exercises developed by Joseph and Clara Pilates, as well as contemporary adaptations of the exercises. The course is compartmentalized into three categories: (1) taking a Pilates mat class (exercise), (2) learning basic anatomy and principles of Pilates (knowledge), and (3) reflecting on one’s personal experience of the work through in-class discussion and out-of-class writing (reflection).

1 credit

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

  • To understand the Pilates Method through discussion of Joseph Pilates and his principles, through execution of mat work, through observation of classmates, and through personal reflections
  • To become familiar with the Pilates practice
  • To develop a practice of bodily mindfulness
  • To discover one’s own bodily limitations and strengths
  • To develop a basic knowledge of functional anatomy and personal, bodily alignment

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Resistance bands, Excerpt from Pilates’ Return to Life Through Contrology by Joseph Pilates, excerpts from Anatomy of Movement by Blandine Calais-Germain

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Preparation, participation, in class movement exams
  • Reflection papers
  • Final Project

Instructor: Rosa-Fischer, Kiana; kcr45@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:170 Yoga For Wellness

Yoga For Wellness

Course Number: 07:203:170
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

In this course, students will learn the historical beginnings of yoga, gaining a broad understanding of the cultural significance of this practice. Basic Sanskrit, Hindu mythology, and the culture of India will also be discussed.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Open to all undergraduate students
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate yoga asanas and vinyasas.
  • Demonstrate pranayama exercises.
  • Execute meditation exercises.
  • Describe a basic introduction of yogic history.
  • Describe the eight limbs of yoga, the chakra system.
  • Explain alignment cues and their anatomical and kinesthetic reasoning, and proprioceptive cues and their sensory reasoning.
  • Evaluate their current daily routines as support systems for their mental and physical health.

Students will create their own wellness plans that integrate asana, pranayama, meditation, and yoga theory from the eight limbs of yoga and the chakras that support their mental and physical health.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Attendance, class participation, journals, midterm assessment, final project

Instructors:
Madeline Warriner, maddwarr@mgsa.rutgers.edu
Julia Shicatano, jms999@psych.rutgers.edu

07:203:225 Modern Dance 3

Modern Dance 3

Course Number: 07:203:225
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Practice in intermediate-level skills in modern dance technique. Modern Dance 3 will prepare students to become more aware of the connection between the body and mind during movement phrases. Students will strengthen their movement skills towards a more advanced level.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required course for the BA in dance. Prerequisite: 07:203:124 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate proper intermediate modern dance technique, which includes alignment, musicality, articulation of the body, and using the space properly.
  • Increase expression in their artistic values through their movement.
  • Use critical thinking skills in order to express their thoughts and ideas about dance in written and oral formats.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Attending class promptly and regularly is essential to comprehension of the material offered in this course.

Instructor: Heather Favretto, classich@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:226 Modern Dance 4

Modern Dance 4

Course Number: 07:203:226
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Continued development of intermediate-level skills in modern dance technique.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:203:225 or permission of instructor. Open only to dance majors and dance minors. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • Alignment, understanding, and application of rotation in place and in motion.
  • Increased core support and whole body strength and integration of movement.
  • Improved awareness and use of weight in movement execution.
  • Increased musicality and rhythmic acuity.
  • Improved kinesthetic development and awareness.
  • A consistent, strong professionalism and work ethic in approach to all aspects of course.
07:203:248 Ballet 3

Ballet 3

Course Number: 07:203:248
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Class includes participation in a complete ballet barre and center including adagio, pirouettes, petit, and grande allegro. The emphasis will be on the practice and principles of the classical ballet vocabulary. Students will be expected to develop and demonstrate the movements with proper body alignment and a sense of artistic expression as well as improved skill and strength.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:149, 07:206:150, or permission of the instructor
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Students will learn principles of alignment, use of weight, use of the torso, and use of the leg, rotation, and feet. Students will learn ballet vocabulary as it relates to barre, center-work, adagio, pirouette, petit allegro, and grand allegro. Students will learn to understand expressiveness and phrasing in ballet combinations, as well as stylistic, aesthetic, and professional conventions of ballet.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: In-studio coursework, daily participation, performance exams, quizzes, written assignments

Instructor: Petteway, Peggy; peggy.petteway@rutgers.edu

07:203:329 Dance Composition

Dance Composition

Course Number: 07:203:329
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Development of fundamental skills in choreography.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Pre-or corequisite: 07:206:142. Required course for BA Dance majors and minors.

Learning Goals of Course: Introduce students to composition concepts for dance making. Concepts will be introduced and developed through exercises and assignments that include research, exploration, application, articulation, and identification of the concepts in their own choreography and the choreography of peers. Concepts covered will provide and help students develop tools for generating movement for larger choreographic projects.

Instructor: Heather Favretto, classich@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:203:350 Performing for Climate Change

Performing for Climate Change

Course Number: 07:203:350
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

3 credit(s)

Course Description:This course provides a conceptual framework and creative practicum for students who wish to engage with climate change through the performing arts. The course is open to students of all disciplines. The prerequisites are an interest in climate change and a willingness to active the creative imagination. Counts toward the Creative Expression and Environment minor.

Counts toward Creative Expression and the Environment

Instructor: Jody Sperling

07:206:100 Dance Assembly

Dance Assembly

Course Number: 07:206:100
Course Format: Lab/Studio

Grade based on attendance. Required of all BFA dance majors for eight semesters of enrollment as a declared major.

N.5 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Required of all B.F.A. dance majors for eight semesters of enrollment as a declared major.

07:206:110 Dance Rotation Workshop

Dance Rotation Workshop

Course Number: 07:206:110

Introduces BFA dance majors to diverse dance techniques and somatic practices through studio-based experiences including, but not limited to: Functional movement, Bollywood, Filipino folk dance, hula, Ori Tahitian, and Moving Rasa. Course content will be presented to students over 12 weeks. Each course meeting time is two hours in duration.

0.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

As a result of participation in this course, students will:

  • Gain exposure to and develop adaptability in learning diverse dance forms, techniques and somatic practices.
  • Experience alternative ways of moving and patterning dance by learning different forms, working with master teachers and/or choreographers.
  • Engage in a course of study intended to prepare them for the physical, cognitive, and mental requirements of codified dance forms/techniques as well as non-codified and specialized dance practices and instruction.
  • Demonstrate evidence of knowledge and skill in diverse dance, movement, and somatic practices.
  • Demonstrate professional composure and inclusivity in approaching and absorbing new dance styles.

Instructor: Jose Lapaz Rodriguez

07:206:126 Rhythm For Dancers

Rhythm For Dancers

Course Number: 07:206:126

Analysis of rhythmic structure relative to movement. Sight-reading note values, movement dictation, and composition.

2 credits

Learning Goals of Course: This course develops dancers’ understanding of music and dance in relation to each other through practice in percussive accompaniment, rhythmic notation, and the analysis and use of music from varied cultures. Through regular written and movement exercises, students develop proficiency using verbal counting systems to analyze, perform and teach movement materials while also learning to read, write and perform standard rhythmic notation.

Instructors:
Vincent Smith
Emmauel Solano

07:206:130 African Diasporic Movement Practices 1

African Diasporic Movement Practices 1

Course Number: 07:206:130
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

African Diasporic Movement Practices brings forward for dancers the origins of Black African Diasporic derived dance forms and fusions and their value in dance training. Forms and fusions of forms will be identified and contextualized culturally and historically in order to provide students with skills essential to embody and physically master the movement practice. The dance form’s social and cultural roots will be studied as essential to the movement practice. Studio work, readings and self-reflections will help students to understand the physical, intentional and expressive values by which a dancer is understood to be proficient in the form.

1.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required for the BFA in dance degree.
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Through the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand and articulate how jazz dance is a manifestation of embodied cultural diversity.
  • Identify and demonstrate distinctive body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required for African American derived jazz dance.
  • Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of jazz dance and its relationships to other forms of dance.
  • Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of jazz dance.
  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied jazz dance.
  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry and communal participation as appropriate to the form.
  • Identify how foundational skills of jazz dance interplay with other forms, movement practices and professional careers.

Instructor: DeAngelo Blanchard

07:206:131 Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 1

Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 1

Course Number: 07:206:131
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Dance forms centered in codified movement vocabularies, emerging from global temporal and cultural contexts. Example forms include: classical ballet, Kathak, Chinese classical dance, and forms based on or derived from Cunningham, Fosse, Cole, Graham, Horton, Limon, Luigi, and Taylor Techniques.

1.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required for the BFA dance degree
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate embodied competency of codified vocabularies, prescriptive grammars, movement sequences and class exercise organization as these relate to ballet.
  • Contextualize, through oral and written communication, how ballet is embedded in historical, social, cultural and/or religio-philosophical frameworks.
  • Integrate and embody social and cultural values as they relate to ballet.
  • Develop self-reflection and analysis skills and demonstrate integration of physical practice, theoretical contexts and sociocultural values through interpretation during class activities and dance works.
  • Apply a variety of regional/national variations of classicisms/traditions that inform ballet, by performing class exercises and dance works.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Crane, Mark. “Classicism” in Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, Vol. 1. Jonathan Dewald, ed., pp. 524-527. New York: Charles Scribner and Son, 2004.

Kealiinohomoku, Joanne. “An anthropologist looks at ballet as a form of ethnic dance.” in What is Dance?: Readings in theory and criticism. Roger Copeland and Marshall Cohen, eds., pp. 533-549. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983. https://www-fulcrum-org.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/epubs/6969z113s?locale=en#/6/1134[xhtml0,0000567]!/4/4/1:0

Instructor: Erika Mero, emero@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:132 Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 1

Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 1

Course Number: 07:206:132
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Contemporary movement practices that draw from at least two forms of dance. Individual forms and fused practice are situated in historical, social, and cultural contexts.

1.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required for the BFA in dance degree.
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course: Through the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to perform core movement concepts including, but not limited to: anatomical function and weight qualities.
  • Identify and articulate the movement lineages, cultural significance, and fused elements of the form.
  • Deconstruct the values of the form in connection to study of other dance forms/practices.
  • Exhibit an increased capacity to integrate new embodied and theoretical knowledge into their dancing as it relates to their individual movement habits and preferences.
  • Effectively work together with attentiveness and responsiveness to the well-being of self and others.

Instructor: Alexx Shilling

07:206:133 Somatic Movement Practices 1

Somatic Movement Practices 1

Course Number: 07:206:133
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Movement practices that emphasize wellness, functional efficiency and injury prevention through embodied experience and integration of body/mind/spirit. Example practices include: Alexander Technique, Bartenieff Fundamentals, Feldenkrias Method, Functional Movement Training, Klein Technique, Pilates, and yoga.

1.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required for the BFA in dance degree.
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

At the completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Define somatics and identify somatic theory and principles that shape the practice.
  • Develop proficiency in embodying movement exercises and principles characteristics.
  • Reflect verbally and in writing their personal experience of how somatics embodies theory and principles and supports dance training, performance and wellness.
  • Recite biographical, historical, pedagogic and cultural facts covered in the course.
  • Situate personal identities, histories and preferences in relationship to somatics.

Instructor: Kiana Fischer, kcr45@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:142 Improvisation I

Improvisation I

Course Number: 07:206:142
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introductory experience in dance improvisation including the use of kinetics, movement design, and spatial sensing as potential sources of movement and partner interaction.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to Dance majors and minors.

Learning Goals of Course: Dancers will explore the ways in which improvisation can be realized across the full spectrum of the artform and investigate how improvisation can be used as a tool for warmup, composition, and performance while expanding one’s way of moving and relating dance to self, group, and life.

Instructors:
Evelyn Wang, cw656@mgsa.rutgers.edu
Pam Tanowitz, ptanowitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:145 Performance Skills 1

Performance Skills 1

Course Number: 07:206:145
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Development of performance skills culminating in the public performance of faculty choreography in a major department faculty production. Performance Skills 1 is designed to build on skills learned in ballet and modern technique, improvisation, and theory courses from the first semester of study in the BFA curriculum. It guarantees students a performance opportunity so that they may practice professionalism within rehearsal and performance environments. A large part of this responsibility includes professionalism and commitment to the ensemble.

2 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

  • Understand how preparedness, rehearsal participation, maintaining a teachable attitude, contributing to the creative process, and demonstrating a professional performance approach are needed for success in the performance of choreography by a faculty member or guest artist.
  • Understand how their participation influences the larger ensemble structure.
  • Value the role of personal responsibility in a creative working environment.

Instructor: Evelyn Wang, cw656@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:146 African Diasporic Movement Practices 2

African Diasporic Movement Practices 2

Course Number: 07:206:146
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

African Diasporic Movement Practices brings forward for dancers the origins of Black African Diasporic derived dance forms and fusions and their value in dance training. Forms and fusions of forms will be identified and contextualized culturally and historically in order to provide students with skills essential to embody and physically master the movement practice. The dance form’s social and cultural roots will be studied as essential to the movement practice. Studio work, readings and self-reflections will help students to understand the physical, intentional, and expressive values by which a dancer is understood to be proficient in the form.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

Through the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand and articulate how the form is a manifestation of embodied cultural diversity.
  • Identify and demonstrate distinctive body organization, rhythmic patterns, and expressive qualities required in the movement practice.
  • Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of the form and its relationships to other forms of dance.
  • Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form.
  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form.
  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry and communal participation as appropriate to the form.
  • Identify how foundational skills of the form interplay with other forms, movement practices, and professional careers.

Instructor: Camille Rennie

07:206:147 Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 2

Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 2

Course Number: 07:206:147
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Through engaging in a new Classical/Traditional form, Movement Practices 2 inwardly builds, outwardly expands, and develops variation in learning from Classical/Traditional Practices 1. Students continue to find connections among the five course goals and learning outcomes listed below. Students will add to their movement vocabulary and also continue to unearth personal voice through a non-hierarchical nexus of learning.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Physical: Demonstrate embodied competency of codified vocabularies, prescriptive  grammars, movement sequences and class exercise organization in the classical/traditional dance form.
  • Theoretical: Contextualize, through oral and written communication, how classical or traditional forms are embedded in historical, social, cultural, and/or religio-philosophical frameworks.
  • Values: Integrate and embody social and cultural values as they relate to the movement practice.
  • Self: Develop self-reflection and analysis skills and demonstrate integration of physical practice, theoretical contexts and sociocultural values through interpretation during class activities and dance works.
  • Community: Apply a variety of regional/national variations of classicisms/traditions that inform the embodied practice of classical/traditional dance forms, by performing class exercises and dance works.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Marjorie B. Perces, Ana Marie Forsythe, and Cheryl Bell (1992). The Dance Technique of Lester Horton. Pennington, NJ: Princeton Book Company. 
  • Jacqueline Shea Murphy (2007). The People Never Stopped Dancing. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.  
  • Susan Rethrost (2016). A Choreographic Mind, Autobiographical Writings. Helsinki, Finland: University of the Arts Helsinki, Theatre Academy. 
  • Catherine Wood (2007) Yvonne Rainer The Mind is a Muscle. United Kingdom, London: Afterall Books.
07:206:148 Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 2

Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 2

Course Number: 07:206:148
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Through engaging in a new Contemporary Fusion form, Movement Practices 2 inwardly builds, outwardly expands, and develops variation in learning from Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 1. Students continue to find connections among the five course goals and learning outcomes listed below. Students will add to their movement vocabulary and continue to unearth personal voice through a non-hierarchical nexus of learning. Students will investigate another Contemporary Fusion form that draws from at least two forms of dance. This is a studio course in which students engage both physically and theoretically with such contemporary movement practices.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

Through the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Physical: Demonstrate an ability to perform core movement concepts as required by the fusion form.
  • Theoretical: Identify and articulate the movement lineages, cultural significance, and fused elements of the form.
  • Values: Deconstruct the values of the form in connection to study of other dance forms/practices.
  • Self: Exhibit an increased capacity to integrate new embodied and theoretical knowledge into their dancing as it relates to their individual movement habits and preferences.
  • Community: Effectively work together with attentiveness and responsiveness to the well-being of self and others.

Instructor: Evelyn Wang

07:206:149 Somatic Movement Practices 2

Somatic Movement Practices 2

Course Number: 07:206:149

This course focuses on theoretical and embodied understanding of selected somatic practice(s) with a special focus on application to dance training and performance. Students will examine somatic theories and principles and how they manifest in somatic practices that emphasize internal physical perception and experience.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Define somatics and identify somatic theory and principles that shape somatic practice.
  • Situate personal identities, histories and preferences in relationship to Somatic practices covered in the course.
  • Recite biographical, historical, pedagogic and cultural facts about Somatic practices covered in the course.
  • Develop proficiency in embodying movement exercises characteristic of somatic practices.
  • Reflect verbally and in writing on their personal experience of somatic practices and how a given somatic practice embodies somatic theory and principles and supports dance training, performance and wellness

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Studio work (85% – 850 points)
  • Homework (15% – 150 points)

Instructor: Jess Michel

07:206:154 Pointe Class

Pointe Class

Course Number: 07:206:154

Class includes participation in a ballet barre and center work. The focus will be on the practice and principles of the classical ballet vocabulary with an emphasis on strengthening foundational skills in pointe technique. Advice will be given on how students can best prepare and maintain their pointe shoes.

1 credit

Learning Goals of Course: 

  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental skills of core strength while on pointe.
  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principles of use of weight while on pointe.
  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principles of the use of alignment while on pointe.
  • Understand and demonstrate the fundamental principles of the use of the leg, hip rotation and feet while on pointe.
  • Recall, differentiate and demonstrate ballet terminology as applied to pointe technique.
  • Demonstrate increased ability in range of movement, muscular strength, standing squarely on the pointes, straightening of legs while in battement tendu, releves, piques of pointe.
  • Understand the history of pointe, the ‘anatomy’ of the pointe shoe and how to correctly fit and maintain their shoes

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Instructor: Peggy Petteway

07:206:155 Ballet Jumps & Turns

Ballet Jumps & Turns

Course Number: 07:206:155

Class includes participation in a ballet barre and center work. The focus will be on the practice and principles of classical ballet jumps and turns.

1 credit

Learning Goals of Course: 

Understand and demonstrate fundamental skills of core strength. Understand and demonstrate fundamental principles of use of weight. Understand and demonstrate fundamental principles of the use of the leg, hip rotation and feet. Understand and demonstrate fundamental principles of the use of alignment. Recall, differentiate and demonstrate ballet terminology as applied to ballet technique. Understand the history of ballet technique

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Daily Participation, Performance and Self-Application: 60%
Performance Exam 1 – Midterm: 15%
Performance Exam 2 – Final: 15%
Written Assignment 1: 3.33%
Written Assignment 2: 3.33%

 

Instructor:
Paul Ocampo

 

 

 

07:206:161 Production Study

Production Study

Course Number: 07:206:161

Crew assignments and production support for department dance performances.

1-2 credits

Instructor: Stephanette Schwartz-Smith, sschwartzsmith@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:175 World Dance

World Dance

Course Number: 07:206:175

Course Description: The study of traditional dance styles of a given culture, their historical development, performance techniques, and terminology. Each semester focuses on a specific culture.

Prerequisites: BA dance majors and dance minors must have completed 07:203:226. Open only to dance majors and dance minors. May be repeated for credit if a new culture.

2 credits

07:206:235 Choreography 1

Choreography 1

Course Number: 07:206:235
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduction to the choreographic process. Solo forms and group choreography.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: 07:206:243 or permission of the instructor

Learning Goals of Course: 

  • Use improvisation and experimentation to expand and develop individual movement vocabulary and deepen creative potential.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the use of compositional elements such as body/space/time/energy relationships, phrasing, sound, and structuring techniques.
  • Speak as an advocate for their work and others’

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

  • Participation 42%
  • Movement Studies and Peer Feedback 18%
  • Final project 10%
  • Research Journal/Research 10%
  • Live Performance Critique 10%

Instructors:
Melanie George
Ani Javian

 

07:206:237 Dance Production

Dance Production

Course Number: 07:206:237
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Theoretical and practical applications of computer, lighting, audio, and technical theater skills necessary to produce, promote, and direct dance productions. Students develop computer skills in graphic design and sound design/editing, as well as computer lighting consoles and theatrical lighting equipment in two professional theaters. Students study lighting design and stage management for dance in theory and practical application around a department production.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required course for BFA and BA dance majors

Learning Goals of Course: Students develop computer skills in graphic design and sound design/editing, as well as computer lighting consoles and theatrical lighting equipment in two professional theaters. Students study lighting design and stage management for dance in theory and practical application around a department production. 

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: 

Lighting Design Project 30%
Portfolio Project 20%
Sound Design Project 20%
Lighting and Design Paper 10%
Technical Rider 10%
Attendance 10%

Instructor: Stephanette Schwartz-Smith, sschwartzsmith@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:243 Improvisation 2

Improvisation 2

Course Number: 07:206:243
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Continued study of dance improvisation including the use of such stimuli as music, dramatic situations, kinetics, movement design, and spatial sensing as potential sources of movement and partner interaction. Students will deepen and broaden their understanding of improvisation as an integral part of creative and performance processes through exploration of contemporary dance practices and creation of movement scores and structures with emphasis upon appreciate, develop, and implement multidisciplinary approaches to improvisation as research.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Prerequisite: 07:206:142 or permission of the instructor. Open only to BFA dance majors.
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Generation and Selection: Student will demonstrate expanded understanding and application of the skills of self and external sourcing towards the generation and selection of improvisational movement material for creative purposes, including choreographic movement phrases and live performance events.
  • Scoring and Directing: Student will understand and demonstrate the creation and application of scores and structures based on a variety of criteria as means to facilitate personal and group improvisational research. Students will demonstrate ability toward directing solo, duet, and group improvisational events.
  • Interdisciplinary Environments: Student will understand, demonstrate and value the potential of cross-curricular, multi and interdisciplinary engagements as resources within improvisation research. Students will learn to value improvisation as a performing art form, in and of itself and in various multi-disciplinary environments.
  • Collaboration and Responsiveness: Student will demonstrate and value the professional practices of awareness of self in relation to others, collaboration and responsiveness within improvisation as an art form in multi- and interdisciplinary environments.
  • Technological Literacy: Student will understand, demonstrate and value technology-assisted approaches to improvisational research with emphasis on application within choreographic and performance projects.
  • Critical Consciousness: Student will understand, demonstrate, and value critical analysis and discourse within improvisation as skills to enhance the exploration of movement concepts and ideas and to refine aesthetic choices. Students will express through conversant written, and verbal and non-verbal forms of communication.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Completion of all projects and submission of all assignments is required in order to complete this course. Attending class promptly and regularly is essential to comprehension of the material offered in this course.

Instructor: Pam Tanowitz, ptanowitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:245 Performance Skills 2

Performance Skills 2

Course Number: 07:206:245

Continued development of performance skills for second-year BFA dance majors. Students are challenged to further refine their technical skills and advance their performance abilities through a collaborative, creative process with a guest or faculty choreographer.

2 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Understand how being prepared for rehearsal is a necessary attribute for professional success.
  • Demonstrate understanding by their consistency of being on time, responsibility to commitments and evidence of prior rehearsal.
  • Value preparedness as a necessary attribute for a professional career in dance. understand the role of personal responsibility as a practice necessary for successful rehearsals.
  • Value rehearsal participation as a necessary attribute for a professional career in dance. understand motivation, behavior, and reception as teachable qualities. value teachable attitude as a necessary attribute for a professional career in dance.
  • Demonstrate application of appropriate aesthetic and stylistic qualities.
  • Demonstrate growth in artistry, application of technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory within an ensemble experience. demonstrate consistent commitment, adaptability and technical accuracy in performances.
  • Value performance approach as a necessary attribute for a professional career in dance.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: 
Rehearsal and Performance work – 90%
Process reflection paper – 10%

Instructor: Barbara Angeline

07:206:260 African Diasporic Movement Practices 3

African Diasporic Movement Practices 3

Course Number: 07:206:260
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Ongoing progression in dance forms derived from or informed by the Black African Diaspora. Example forms include: West African, Afro-Fusion, hip-hop, jazz, street dance, Dunham-based technique.

1.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:146
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Physical: Identify and demonstrate distinctive body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Theoretical: Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of the form and its relationships to other forms. Draw connections between the Movement Practice 3 form and forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2. Contextualize African Diasporic Movement Practices studied in relationship to forms studied and being studied in Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 1-3; Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 1-3; and Somatic Movement Practices 1-3.
  • Values: Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Self: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry. Navigate stepping forward and stepping back in communal participation, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • Community: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Communication: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or feelings based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
07:206:261 Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 3

Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 3

Course Number: 07:206:261
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Ongoing progression in dance forms centered in codified movement vocabularies emerging from global temporal and cultural contexts. Example forms include: classical ballet, Bharatanatyam, Chinese classical dance, and forms based on or derived from Cunningham, Fosse, Cole, Graham, Hawkins, Horton, Limon, Luigi, and Taylor techniques.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:147
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to…

  • Physical: Identify and demonstrate embodied competency of codified vocabularies, prescriptive grammars required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Theoretical: Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of the form and its relationships to other forms. Draw connections between the Movement Practice 3 form and forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2. Contextualize Classical/Traditional Movement Practices studied in relationship to forms studied and being studied in African Diasporic Movement Practices 1-4; Contemporary Movement Practices 1-4; and Somatic Movement Practices 1-4.
  • Values: Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1, 2, and 3.
  • Self: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry. Navigate stepping forward and stepping back in communal participation, collaboration, and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • Community: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1, 2, and 3.
  • Communication: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or feelings based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.

Instructor: Peggy Petteway, ppetteway@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:262 Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 3

Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 3

Course Number: 07:206:262
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Continued study and training in contemporary movement practices that draw from at least two forms of dance. Individual forms and fused practice are situated in historical, social, and cultural contexts. Example forms include: release techniques, Yorchha, Bollywood, and contemporary ballet.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:148
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Through the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Physical: Identify and demonstrate distinctive body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Theoretical: Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of the form and its relationships to other forms. Draw connections between Movement Practice 3 form and forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2. Contextualize Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices studied in relationship to forms studied and being studied in Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 1-3; African Diasporic Movement Practices 1-3; and Somatic Movement Practices 1-3.
  • Values: Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Self: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry. Navigate stepping forward and stepping back in communal participation, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • Community: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Communication: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or feelings based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspective and artistic-choice making.

Instructor: Kruti Shah, krshah@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:263 Somatic Movement Practices 3

Somatic Movement Practices 3

Course Number: 07:206:263
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Ongoing progression in movement practices that emphasize wellness, functional efficiency and injury prevention through embodied experience and integration of body/mind/spirit. Example practices include: Alexander Technique, Bartenieff Fundamentals, Feldenkrais Method, Franklin Method, Functional Movement Training, Klein Technique, Pilates, and Yoga.

1.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:149
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Physical: Identify and demonstrate distinctive body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Theoretical: Analyze and articulate historical and cultural contexts of the form and its relationships to other forms. Draw connections between the Movement Practice 3 form and forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2. Contextualize the current Somatic form in relationship to forms studied and being studied in African Diasporic Practices 1-3, Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 1-3, and Contemporary Movement Practices 1-3.
  • Values: Build physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Self: Demonstrate individual choice-making. Navigate stepping forward and stepping back in communal participation, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • Community: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1 and 2.
  • Communication: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or feelings based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.

Instructor: Wanda Gala, wg228@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:264 African Diasporic Movement Practices 4

African Diasporic Movement Practices 4

Course Number: 07:206:264

Through engagement in a new form, African Diasporic Movement Practices 4 continues to advance the artistic and kinesthetic investment in inwardly building, outwardly expanding, and developing variations in learning from African Diasporic Movement Practices 1, 2, and 3. Students elevate increasingly sophisticated connections among the six course goals and learning outcomes listed below and apply skills, approaches to movement, and contexts learned in Movement Practices 1 and 2 to train in a new African Diasporic-derived form as an informed dancer in the movement practice.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry and a strong mindset.
  • Navigate stepping forward and stepping back in communal participation, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in Commercial Hip Hop and Street Jazz and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-3.
  • Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or feelings based on the performance conventions of Commercial Hip Hop and Street Jazz and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
  • Identify and demonstrate distinctive body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in Commercial Hip Hop & Street Jazz and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-3

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:
Homework (15% – 150 points)
Studio work (85% – 850 points)

Instructor: Melanie George

07:206:265 Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 4

Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 4

Course Number: 07:206:265

Continued study and training in dance forms centered in codified movement vocabularies, emerging from global temporal and cultural contexts. Example forms include: classical ballet, Bharatanatyam, Chinese classical dance, and forms based on or derived from Cunningham, Fosse, Cole, Graham, Hawkins, Horton, Limon, Luigi, and Taylor Techniques.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1, 2 and 3.
  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry.
  • Navigate stepping forward and stepping back in communal participation, collaboration, and leadership as appropriate to the form.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:
Studio work (85% – 850 points)
Homework (15% – 150 points)

Instructor: DeAngelo Blanchard

07:206:266 Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 4

Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 4

Course Number: 07:206:266

Through engagement in a new Contemporary Fusion form, Movement Practices 4 continues to advance the artistic and kinesthetic investment of inwardly building, outwardly expanding, and developing variation in learning from Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 1, 2, and 3. Students investigate this additional Contemporary Fusion form that draws from at least two forms of dance. This is a studio course in which students engage both physically and theoretically with contemporary movement practices. The course situates the individual forms and fused practice within historical, social, and cultural lenses to provide an understanding of lineage, to accurately represent the values of the practice, and to help students recognize their individual relationship to the practice. The course emphasizes the progression from internal investigation to external expression.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Phrasing or through-line arc as it relates to sequenced material in the body and space.
  • Integration of breath support in full bodied movement.
  • Engagement in body and mind through the entirety of a movement phrase or exercise.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:
Studio work (85% – 850 points)
Homework (15% – 150 points)

Instructor: Alexx Shilling

07:206:267 Somatic Movement Practices 4

Somatic Movement Practices 4

Course Number: 07:206:267

Continue to focus on theoretical and embodied understanding of selected somatic practice(s) with a special focus on application to dance training and performance. Students will examine somatic theories and principles and how they manifest in somatic practices that emphasize internal physical perception and experience. Distinctive forms enable students to better understand how they can promote wellness and self-knowledge, and prevent injury through continued and varied experiences with and reflective thinking about somatic practices.

1.5 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Students will learn how to implement conditioning exercises and stretches, apply proper body mechanics, and principles to help prevent dance injuries.
  • These exercises and self-care techniques will help to improve balance, stability, strength, flexibility, mobility, endurance, alignment, and overall dance performance.
  • Exercises and stretches will be tailored to student’s individual needs and abilities to discover their strengths while embracing and working on their weaknesses. As a result, students will not see limitations but find solutions.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Romita, N., & Romita, A. (2016). Functional Awareness: Anatomy in action for dancers. Oxford University Press; Functional Awareness: Anatomy in Action for Dancers by Nancy Romita & Allegra Romita

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:
Studio work (85% – 850 points)
Homework (15% – 150 points)
 
Instructor: Hollie Palmisano
07:206:274 Jazz Dance 2 (Jazz Dance)

Jazz Dance 2 (Jazz Dance)

Course Number: 07:206:274
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Various styles and techniques in the idiom of jazz dance. Familiarizes non-dance majors to technical and performance aspects of jazz dance. The course introduces students to a variety of jazz styles to provide a broad foundation from which to select future training opportunities.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:203:155 or 07:206:130
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the reciprocal relationship of culture and the arts, specifically culture and dance.
  • Demonstrate embodied understanding of jazz dance characteristics.
  • Analyze Broadway jazz dance to differentiate historical, cultural, and artistic components.
  • Embody choreographic, cultural, and historical elements in performance of Broadway jazz dances.
  • Physicalize individual intent in conjunction with choreographic intent.
  • Articulate and demonstrate best practices in participating in Broadway dance classes and auditions.

Instructor: Barbara Angeline

07:206:277 Latin and Hispanic Dance Forms

Latin and Hispanic Dance Forms

Course Number: 07:206:277
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Studio course includes technique and performance of selected dance forms within their historical and cultural contexts. Dance forms may include indigenous, diasporic, and hybrid dances from the Caribbean, Mexico, and South America; classical Spanish and Flamenco dance; and Filipino dances derived from Spanish influence.

2 credits

Course Prerequisite: None. May be repeated for credit if the course is covering a culture that was not studied in the earlier iteration in which the student was enrolled.

07:206:312 Advanced Ballet (Ballet 7)

Advanced Ballet (Ballet 7)

Course Number: 07:206:312
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Studio-based course with barre and center format. We will call upon our curiosities and sense of play to examine and embody classical ballet vocabulary through the applications of somatic practices, repertory, and improvisation techniques. Class material will increase with complexity of vocabulary, tempos, and spatial pathways over the course of the semester. Journaling and class discussions will include, but are not limited to: the role of ballet – a Eurocentric form – in the 21st century, the potential for ballet class to be an individual and/or collective practice, and applications of tools/approaches learned in this class to other dance forms.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Four classes in dance at MGSA or two years of previous classical/traditional training with permission of dept.
Course Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Establish efficient movement patterns that support range of motion, stabilization, and coordination in ballet vocabulary.
  • Recognize and refer to their personal alignment.
  • Embody somatic approaches within the context of ballet.
  • Recognize the relationship of inner connectivity to outer expressivity.
  • Embody choreographic and stylistic elements of repertory.
  • Physicalize individual intent in choreographic or improvisational prompts.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Clothing: Traditional ballet attire; leotards (form fitting t-shirt, no bare midriff) and tights. Dance belts recommended to those that need them. Students are allowed to wear formfitted layered clothing to assist in warm up at barre only.
  • Hair: Secured neatly and completely off the neck and shoulders, in a manner so as not to interfere with the work.
  • Jewelry: No jewelry
  • Shoes: Ballet slippers are required for ballet class.
  • Please bring water to class.
  • Contact the instructor if you have any individual needs and if you have an interest intaking the class en pointe.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

  • Class participation and performance
  • Written work

Instructor: Erika Mero

07:206:319 Sound and Movement

Sound and Movement

Course Number: 07:206:319
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Analysis of the relationships of music and dance in content, form, and structure.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Course required for all BFA Dance majors. BA Dance majors must complete 07:203:126 prior to enrollment in this course.

Learning Goals of Course: To expand the listening experience of the student by challenging them to study and incorporate experimental forms of sound and music into their own work. Emphasis will be placed on personal choice. Students will explore graphic notation and create their own scores out of their own sound recordings to demystify the process and gain agency.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Students will be expected to be able to discuss and write about how the music studied has affected their choreography and dancing. Students will document the experience of listening to new music through creative writing, allowing the sounds to influence their chosen form. The idea of research as an inspirational, creative tool will be explored.

Instructor: Dan Siegler, ds1510@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:325 Kinesiology-Dance

Kinesiology-Dance

Course Number: 07:206:325

Functional human anatomy and the study of the scientific basis of human movement as they relate to dance training. Course includes somatic studies of diverse movement disciplines.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Identify by name and location the major bones and muscles of the body.
  • Describe the actions of the major muscles of the body. Identify prime movers for joint movements at major body joints.
  • Analyze fundamental and technical dance movements and identify key joints, the primary motive forces, the type of muscle contraction, and the key muscles acting as prime movers and stabilizers.
  • Describe primary biomechanical principles at key joints influencing injury risk and correct movement technique.

Required and Recommended Course Materials:

  • Kapit, W., & Elson, L. M. (2014). The Anatomy Coloring Book 4th Edition. New York: Harper & Row. ISBN-
    13 978-0321832016.
  • Additional Resource: Clippinger, K. (2016). Dance Anatomy and Kinesiology 2nd Edition With the Web Resource. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. ISBN-13: 9781450469289.
  • Colored pencils are preferred

Instructor: Hollie Palmisano

07:206:326 Adaptive Movement through Dance

Adaptive Movement through Dance

Course Number: 07:206:326
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

An integrated lecture/studio course training students how to use various types of movement methods in dance. The course trains students how to use various types of movement methods in dance. These include ballet, modern, jazz, tap, ballroom, musical theater choreography, and the brain dance to create a series of rhythmic patterns.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Learn how to work with differently abled individuals who require adaptive movement and provide appropriate movement practices
  • Develop an understanding of somatics and sensorimotor learning techniques and practices that support breath, flexibility and balance
  • Understand how coping mechanisms such as adaptive movement can be important for people who have congenital conditions or have been diagnosed with a debilitating and life-changing disease or disorder
  • Develop a template that integrates the Adaptive Model Theory (AMT) to create a program that is applicable to populations that would benefit from an adaptive movement dance class.

Instructor: Natalie Schultz-Kahwaty

07:206:328 Dance Workshop

Dance Workshop

Course Number: 07:206:328
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

1 credit

Course Description: This course explores the technical and performance aspects of Jazz Dance in musical theater. Together we will explore the relationship of jazz dance to the greater context of its history, evolution and influence on other dance styles. The connections between jazz dance, narrative intent, personal expression, singing and acting will also be embodied. 

Key Topics:
· Performance of jazz dance technique in many of its forms
· Historical overview of jazz dance
· Relationship of cultural change and its influence on jazz dance styles
· Jazz innovators and choreographers and their significant works
· Evolution and expansion of jazz dance styles 

Learning Goals:
· Understand the reciprocal relationship of culture and the arts, specifically culture and jazz dance.
· Demonstrate embodied understanding of jazz dance characteristics.
· Analyze jazz dance to differentiate and embody historical, cultural and artistic components.
· Embody personal expressions of identity and meaning.
· Perform dancing, singing and acting as tools for narrative and individual expression.

Instructor: Barbara Angeline, barbange@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:334 Choreography 2

Choreography 2

Course Number: 07:206:334
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Continued development of solo and group choreographic process with emphasis on movement invention and experimental forms.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:206:235. Open only to BFA Dance majors.

Learning Goals of Course: Student choreographers will have a well-articulated group work that could be auditioned for venues both inside and outside of Mason Gross.

Instructors:
Melanie George
Evelyn Wang, cw656@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:335 Choreography 3

Choreography 3

Course Number: 07:206:335
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Communication through movement with emphasis upon structural development.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:206:334. Open only to BFA Dance majors.

Learning Goals of Course: Further develops the student’s approach to the choreographic process. Students will pursue individual creative interests to create a solo or duet work with a collaborating artist and will begin research for a forthcoming group project. Completed choreographic works from this course will be publicly presented.

Instructors:
John Evans, jevans@mgsa.rutgers.edu
Pam Tanowitz, ptanowitz@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:344 Video for Dance

Video for Dance

Course Number: 07:206:344
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Communication through dance as a video art. Emphasis on video shooting and editing techniques, environmental controls, choreographed and improvisational dance movement structures used in the creation of short dance films. Smaller projects lead to a final dance on film project for each student

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Open major/unit 203, 206, 207
Learning Goals of Course: Students will:

  • become knowledgeable and adept in the use of a digital video camera,
  • learn the operation of Final Cut X and/or Adobe Premiere Pro video editing software,
  • work to refine the choreographic eye as it pertains to movement on the screen,
  • work to develop a point of view as a videographer and director of movement on the screen,
  • survey the art created by artists and technicians (dance, music, visual, media) who are working along the intersections between dance and technology to surmise future career possibilities,
  • observe, discuss, and evaluate aesthetic and conceptual issues from screen dance as a hybrid medium in the experimental and technology-based dance genres to foster critical awareness,
  • view and discuss screen dance works by a variety of artists,
  • understand how to support your own learning and how to help others learn by using online tutorials and software forums.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: In-depth study of dance as a video art with a focus on aesthetic analysis and practical application of the medium and its varying uses. Focusing on how the medium can be used as a stand-alone art form and how it is used as support for live performance. Digital video camera and headset (students may sign out a camera and headset for daily use through Rutgers Library), individual class notebook, individual hard drive.

Instructor: O’Connell, Stephen; soconnell@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:345 Advanced Improvisation

Advanced Improvisation

Course Number: 07:206:345
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Advanced development of improvisational skills with an emphasis on form as an integral part of creative and performance processes through exploration of contemporary dance practice and interdisciplinary performance practices.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:142 & 07:206:243. Required for BFA dance majors.

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Understand, demonstrate, and value critical analysis and discourse within improvisation to enhance the exploration of movement concepts and ideas and refine aesthetic choices.
  • Students will express themselves through written, verbal, and non-verbal forms of communication. demonstrate and value the professional practices of awareness of self in relation to others, collaboration, and responsiveness within improvisation as an art form in interdisciplinary environments; understand and demonstrate the creation and application of scores and structures based on a variety of criteria as means to facilitate personal and group improvisational research.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to direct solo, duet, and group improvisational events

Instructor: Gerald Casel

07:206:346 African Diasporic Movement Practices 5

African Diasporic Movement Practices 5

Course Number: 07:206:346
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

2.5 credits

Intensive study and training in dance forms derived from or informed by Africa and/or the Black African Diaspora. Development of improvisational and choreographic skills in the form with direct connections to repertory performance opportunities. Example forms include: West African, Afro-Fusion, Hip-Hop, Jazz, Street Dance, Dunham-based Technique.

Learning Goals:

  • PHYSICAL: Identify and demonstrate distinctive and deepened clarity of body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4.
  • VALUES: Expand and incorporate physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Develop and demonstrate improvisation and choreographic skills and strategies within the historic and aesthetic values of the form.
  • SELF: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • COMMUNICATION: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or narratives based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
  • COLLECTIVE: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback.

Instructor: Melanie George

07:206:347 Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 5

Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 5

Course Number: 07:206:347
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

2.5 credits

Intensive study and training in dance forms centered in codified movement vocabularies, emerging from global temporal and cultural contexts. Example forms include: Classical Ballet, Bharatanatyam, Chinese classical dance, and forms based on or derived from Cunningham, Fosse, Cole, Graham, Hawkins, Horton, Limon, Luigi, and Taylor Techniques.

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:265

Learning Goals:

  • PHYSICAL: Identify and demonstrate distinctive and deepened clarity of body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4.
  • VALUES: Expand and incorporate physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Develop and demonstrate improvisation and choreographic skills and strategies within the historic and aesthetic values of the form.
  • SELF: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • COMMUNICATION: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or narratives based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
  • COLLECTIVE: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback.

Instructor: Courtney Henry, courtney.henry@rutgers.edu

07:206:348 Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 5

Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 5

Course Number: 07:206:348
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

2.5 credits

Intensive study and training in contemporary movement practices that draw from at least two forms of dance. Individual forms and fused practice are situated in historical, social, and cultural contexts. Example forms include: Release Techniques, Yorchha, Bollywood, Contemporary Ballet.

Learning Goals:

  • PHYSICAL: Identify and demonstrate distinctive and deepened clarity of body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4.
  • VALUES: Expand and incorporate physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Develop and demonstrate improvisation and choreographic skills and strategies within the historic and aesthetic values of the form.
  • SELF: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • COMMUNICATION: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or narratives based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
  • COLLECTIVE: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback.

Instructor: Luis Lara, ll1124@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:349 Somatic Movement Practices 5

Somatic Movement Practices 5

Course Number: 07:206:349
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

2.5 credits

Intensive study in a Somatic Movement Practice that emphasizes wellness, functional efficiency and injury prevention through embodied experience and integration of body/mind/spirit. Development of creative and practical skills for use of the form with direct connections to diverse applications.

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:267

Learning Goals:

  • PHYSICAL: Identify and demonstrate distinctive and deepened clarity of body organization, rhythmic patterns and expressive qualities required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4.
  • VALUES: Expand and incorporate physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Develop and demonstrate improvisation and choreographic skills and strategies within the historic and aesthetic values of the form.
  • SELF: Develop and demonstrate individual artistry, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.
  • COMMUNICATION: Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or narratives based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
  • COLLECTIVE: Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-4. Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback.

Instructor: Ani Javian, ajavian@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:352 Teaching as an Artist

Teaching as an Artist

Course Number: 07:206:352
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

A pedagogical introduction into the nuances and skill set necessary to effectively teach dance to different ages and levels, in differing environments (i.e. K-12, studio, professional company, etc.). Through an active performer lens, students will deconstruct and examine the specialized attributes and knowledge essential for teaching and integrate them to become well-rounded and successful teaching-artists.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required course for BFA dance majors ​

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Work as a performer with teaching artist skills within dance companies or arts organizations.
  • Develop residencies for his or her own current or future dance company.
  • Develop thoughtful lesson plans for studio teaching and K-12 programs.
  • Develop and implement teaching experiences in the junior/senior year as a company member of the University Dance Works student company

Instructor: Cristina Marte

07:206:356 African Diasporic Movement Practices 6

African Diasporic Movement Practices 6

Course Number: 07:206:356
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Intensive study and training in dance forms derived from or informed by Africa and/or the Black African Diaspora. Development of improvisational and choreographic skills in the form with direct connections to repertory performance opportunities. Example forms include: West African, Afro-Fusion, Hip-Hop, Jazz, Street Dance, Dunham-based Technique.

2.5 credits

Course Prerequisites:07:206:346

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-5.
  • Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback.
  • Expand and incorporate physical, cognitive, and expressive skills and stamina within the aesthetic and values of the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-5.
  • Develop and demonstrate improvisation and choreographic skills and strategies within the historic and aesthetic values of the form.
  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry, collaboration and leadership as appropriate to the form.

Instructor: Belinda McGuire

07:206:357 Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 6

Classical/Traditional Movement Practices 6

Course Number: 07:206:357
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Intensive study and training in dance forms centered in codified movement vocabularies, emerging from global temporal and cultural contexts. Development of improvisational and choreographic skills in the form with direct connections to repertory performance opportunities. Example forms include: Classical Ballet, Bharatanatyam, Chinese classical dance, and forms based on or derived from Cunningham, Fosse, Cole, Graham, Hawkins, Horton, Limon, Luigi, and Taylor Techniques

2.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:347

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-5.
  • Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback
  • Identify and demonstrate embodied competency of codified vocabularies, prescriptive grammars required in the form and in connection to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-5.
  • Develop and demonstrate individual artistry, communal participation and leadership as appropriate to the form.
07:206:358 Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 6

Contemporary Fusion Movement Practices 6

Course Number: 07:206:358
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Intensive study and training in contemporary movement practices that draw from at least two forms of dance. Development of improvisational and choreographic skills in the form with direct connections to repertory performance opportunities. Individual forms and fused practice are situated in historical, social, and cultural contexts. Example forms include: Release Techniques, Yorchha, Bollywood, Contemporary Ballet.

2.5 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:348

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Create, analyze and articulate improvisational and choreographic principles, structure and intention within the Movement Practice form(s) and contextualize them, if applicable, within historical, social, political and cultural perspectives.
  • Analyze and demonstrate the ways in which social constructs and social actions are embodied in the form and how these embodied constructs and actions compare, contrast and/or connect to forms studied in Movement Practices 1-5.
  • Articulate advanced analytic skills in peer assessment and feedback.
  • Embody, communicate and express ideas, qualities, or narratives based on the performance conventions of the form and in relation to personal identities, perspectives and artistic choice-making.
07:206:360 University Danceworks

University Danceworks

Course Number: 07:206:360
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Performance experience in the student touring dance company.

2 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to BFA Dance majors in their third and fourth years. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.

Learning Goals of Course: Student performers are exposed to the demands of participating in a professional dance company, learn repertory and/or engage in the creation of new works by faculty, guest, student and other selected choreographers. After a rigorous rehearsal period in the fall semester, UDW travels extensively during the spring semester throughout New Jersey, New York City and Philadelphia metropolitan areas.

Instructors:
Ani Javian, ajavian@mgsa.rutgers.edu
Kruti Shah, krshah@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:363 Dance Repertory

Dance Repertory

Course Number: 07:206:363
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study and performance of historical and contemporary repertory by guest or resident choreographers.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: BA Dance Majors may audition for Spring Repertory to fulfill performance requirement

Guest Choreographers:
Beth Gill
John Evans

07:206:370 History and Theory of Integrated Dance Online

History and Theory of Integrated Dance Online

Course Number: 07:206:370
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

The History and Theory of Integrated Dance offers a thorough investigation of the development of the integrated dance culture within the U.S. and internationally. The course traces the origins of disability dance back to the disability rights movement and the subsequent emergence of educational, recreational, and artistic opportunities for disabled populations. A theoretical understanding of integrated dance is developed through examining various models of disability and how they have developed historically and, specifically, how these models apply to education, physical recreation, and dance, in particular. The course investigates how perceptions of disability either challenge or reinforce ideas of ‘normalized’ bodies and how a dancing body might look. We explore the possibility that integrated dance creates its own theory. A broad understanding of diversity informs a "universal design" approach to developing both teaching and choreography that is inclusive, responsive, and ethical for dancers of all abilities.

For non-credit version, register here: https://go.rutgers.edu/noncreditdanceonline

Registration opens Tuesday, January 10, 2023

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None
Learning Goals of Course

Through this course, students will:

  • Examine how integrated dance has emerged out of a particular socio-political environment and a bio-politics.
  • Examine their own understandings and experience of disability by developing an awareness of disability culture and its progressive models.
  • Discuss the history of integrated dance, both in the U.S. and internationally, as an expression of difference and identity politics in dance terms.
  • Explore strategies and principles that support diversity, inclusion, equity, and access, and how they can be integrated into teaching and planning choreographic projects.
  • Explore teaching and choreographic processes that are inclusive and informed by the principle of universal design and, by doing so, develop an understanding of how to relate to and work with a range of abilities/disabilities by accommodating dancers with diverse needs.
  • Develop a model teaching seminar that exhibits a synthesized understanding of integrated dance within a range of selected topics

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand and articulate a variety of perspectives on the politics of difference and identity politics.
    Articulate their own understandings and experiences of disability through increased clarity on disability culture and its progressive models,
  • Use national and international integrated dance to exemplify an expressive culture that articulates the politics of difference and identity in dance terms
  • Demonstrate how disability dance culture expands reductive theories and practices to develop dance artists and teachers who value diversity, inclusion, equity and access.
  • Articulate how dance classes and dance choreography value artists with disabilities by incorporating strategies and principles that accommodate diversity.
  • Demonstrate synthesized knowledge on integrated dance in a range of selected topics using pedagogical skills appropriate for a selected disabled population

Instructor: Suzanne Cowan, sc2296@rutgers.edu

07:206:402 Laban/Bartenieff Fundamentals for Dance Education

Laban/Bartenieff Fundamentals for Dance Education

Course Number: 07:206:402

A systematic study of Laban’s theoretical model describing concepts and principles of human movement. Includes an overview of Bartenieff Fundamentals (BF), an integrative tool for reeducating the body

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open only to dance majors.

Instructors:
Frederick Curry, fcurry@mgsa.rutgers.edu
Ana Bella, abella@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:410 Neuroscience & Dance

Neuroscience & Dance

Course Number: 07:206:410

Neuroscience in Partnership with Dance will explore how our brain and related nervous system are affected by rhythmic and patterned sequences of dance movement, creating new neurological connections.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Students in the Exercise Science concentration at the Kinesiology and Health Department may enroll in this course by completing equivalent pre-requisites, by petition. Motor Learning and Control may also be enrolled simultaneously.

Instructor: Natalie Schultz-Kahwaty, ns1199@mgsa.rutgers.edu

**07:206:431 Dance History: World Survey Online

Dance History: World Survey Online

Course Number: 07:206:431
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

In order to understand the history of dance, we must first ask–why do we dance? While dancing is a universal human activity, it does not play the same role in every culture. 07:206:431 examines the many functions of dance around the world and throughout history. The independent, triangular relationship between a given dance’s function, form and context will be revealed through an analysis of original source readings and selected videos. Weekly discussion board posting and blog entries will provide opportunity for reflection on the broad range of concerts that affect dance’s place and purpose in different societies.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course:

Course Goals
Through this course students will:

  • Broaden their knowledge of the distinct historical formations of dance practices across various continental areas;
  • Comprehend vital terminology associated with these different dance forms.

Learning Objectives
This course aims for students to:

  • Openly discuss and engage in questions about dance tradition, as a form of historical innovation, with a set of aesthetic roots in social environment.
  • Think collaboratively in outlining the regional contexts assigned to dance styles, and in considering how these forms have circulated outside their continental territory.
  • Write analytically about how particular dance forms have emerged out of historical processes, or have continued to transform alongside the restrictions or possibilities of social dynamics.
  • Work methodically toward completing a well-written grant proposal in the arts and humanities.

Learning Outcomes
As a result of participating in this course, students will:

  • Examine how dance forms emerge from specific relationships with land, and/or through the terms of colonial histories.
  • Build the capacity to link dance performance to social dynamics rooted in ceremony, ritual, and communal practices.
  • Develop awareness of how dance styles have formed in ways that bolster the construction of individual and collective identities.
  • Thoroughly comprehend how social categories such as gender, sexuality, and race have historically influenced the making of dance forms.
  • Think critically about how dance practices emerge within and outside the territorial fixations of continent, country, and/or nation.
  • Effectively write and orally present on goals and objectives of their grant writing proposal.

Instructors:
Alessandra Lebea Williams, alessandra.williams@rutgers.edu
Jeffrey Friedman, jfdance@mgsa.rutgers.edu

**07:206:432 Dance History: 1900 to the Present Online

Dance History: 1900 to the Present Online

Course Number: 07:206:432
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Online Asynchronous

This course provides an overview of the development of ballet, modern, and contemporary dance practice throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Original source readings will describe the dance field’s major figures and movement theories, while videos will introduce the work of selected choreographers. The interdependent relationship between dance and society will be revealed through the analysis of dance works within their social, cultural, historical, and political contexts. Reading, video, and movement discussion board postings and Blog presentations will provide opportunity for reflection on the broad range of concerns that inform an individual choreographer’s work. There will be six quizzes and students will write two long essays.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals of Course

Course Goals
Through this course, students will examine:

  • 21st-Century Challenges
    • Analyze the degree to which forms of human difference shape a person’s experiences of and perspectives on the world.
  • Social Science and History
    • Understand the bases & development of human and societal endeavors across time and place.
    • Identify and critically assess ethical issues in social science and history.
  • Historical Analysis
    • Explain the development of some aspect of a society or culture over time, including the history of ideas.
  • Arts and the Humanities
    • Examine critically philosophical and other theoretical issues concerning the nature of reality, human experience, knowledge, value and/or cultural production.
    • Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values languages, cultures, and technologies.Engage critically in the process of creative expression.

Course Objectives
Through the successful completion of this course, students will be able:

  • To describe, comprehend, and analyze historical movements and philosophical ideas in the development of modern and contemporary dance practice throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
  • To critically analyze writings about, as well as dance works and practices drawn from, a wide variety of choreographers.
  • To be knowledgeable of specific dance genres and the appropriate dance terminology used to describe them.
  • To view and then be able to critique diverse dance works with effective writing skills.
  • To conduct research using multiple information sources. To integrate sources effectively & ethically using proper citation.
  • To place practice in social and historical context.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading

  • Grading Policies/Course Requirements: Incomplete assignments average into the summative grade as a zero. BFA Dance Majors may also be placed on artistic probation for receiving a grade of C or less in a Dance Department course required for completion of their degree.
  • Requirements:
    • Reading/Viewing Responses and Discussion Posts (9 x 4 points each) 36 points
    • Office Hour Meeting with Instructor, 3 points
    • Preliminary Video Submission, 6 points
      • Peer Response, 6 points
    • Analysis Paper
      • Peer Review of Analysis Paper, 2 points
      • Analysis Paper, 10 points
    • Making Dance History Accessible Symposium
      • Peer Review of Final Blog, 2 points
      • Final Blog, 19 points
      • Rough-cut Social Media Video, 2 points
      • Final Video, 10 points
    • Final Evaluation, 4 points
    • Total Points: 100 points

Instructors:
Alessandra Lebea Williams, alessandra.williams@rutgers.edu
Jeffrey Friedman, jfdance@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:434 Choreography 4

Choreography 4

Course Number: 07:206:434
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Choreography 4 further develops the student’s approach to the choreographic process. Utilizing these experiences, students will pursue individual creative interests to create a group work and publish a personal professional website. Completed choreographic works from this course will be publicly presented.

2 credits

Course Prerequisites: Open to class level 4 seniors

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Articulate a sophisticated understanding of their choreographic practices
  • Situate their choreography within a variety of artistic and theoretical contexts
  • Be able to work effectively with a collaborating artist from another discipline
  • Exhibit the ability to analyze and discuss choreography in written and verbal formats
07:206:441 Dance History: World Survey

Dance History: World Survey

Course Number: 07:206:441
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Study of dance in diverse global cultures and historical time periods through film, video, reading, lectures, discussion, and directed research.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: Students may not receive credit for both 07:206:431 and 441

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Understand and organize the historical periods and locations within which a variety of diverse dance practices occurs
  • Describe a variety of diverse dance practices using appropriate concepts and vocabulary, including performance experiences
  • Contextualize diverse dance practices within their historical, social, cultural and/or political frameworks
  • Understand and value how selected theoretical frameworks deepen inquiry into diverse dance practices
  • Develop concise, well-constructed oral and written arguments that synthesize information on specific dance artists, works and artistic practices as they link to and are contextualized by social, cultural, historical and/or political contexts as well as selected theoretical frameworks

Instructor: Jeff Friedman

07:206:442 Dance History: 1900 to Present

Dance History: 1900 to Present

Course Number: 07:206:442
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Dance artists and dance masterpieces in the Western theater tradition from 1900 to the present. Study of the influences on contemporary concert dance of diverse cultural, artistic, and social movements through film, video, reading, lectures, discussion, and directed research.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: Required course for BFA dance majors. Students may not receive credit for both 07:206:432 and 442.
Learning Goals of Course: By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand 20th century modern/post-modern dance, using appropriate historical periods;
  • recognize and value the cross-fertilization of American and German streams of modern dance;
  • identify names, and describe the important works of German dance artists and theorists;
  • understand and value the social, cultural, and historical contexts within which European-derived modern/post-modern dances were generated and celebrated;
  • articulate the effects of White supremacy and racist ideologies on equity and access for dance training, performance, and creative opportunities for non-European heritage dance artists;
  • emplace themselves as dance artists/thinkers within the historical continuum of modern/post-modern dance practices;
  • develop concise, well-constructed oral and written arguments that synthesize information on specific dance artists, works and artistic practices as they link to and are contextualized by social, cultural, and historical contexts.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Purchase through Douglass Co-op Bookstore, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or find them on Reserve at Douglass Library:

  • Moving History/Dancing Cultures,  Ann Dils and Ann Cooper Albright, eds., Duke University Press, 1997
  • Dance As a Theatre Art. Selma Jeanne Cohen, ed., Princeton Books,
  • The Makers of Modern Dance in Germany, Isa/Harold Partsch-Bergsohn
  • Oral Histories
    • Pauline Henderson: Partly Mirth. _LEGACY Oral History Project.
    • Vivian Fine. LEGACY Oral History Project.
    • Jane Brown. LEGACY Oral History Project.
    • Eve Gentry: A Kaleidoscopic History. LEGACY Oral History Project.
  • DVDs/videos, as embedded within the course content in Canvas course shell

Instructor: Alessandra Williams, awilliams@mgsa.rutgers.edu

07:206:444 Technique 7

Technique 7

Course Number: 07:206:444

Practice in advanced skills in modern dance.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisite: 07:206:343. Open only to B.F.A. dance majors. May be repeated once for credit with department approval.

Instructor: Gerald Casel, gerald.casel@rutgers.edu

07:206:445 Technique 8

Technique 8

Course Number: 07:206:445
Course Format: Lab/Studio
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: Open to class level 4-seniors

**Note: Dance History: World Survey Online is only available to BFA and BA Dance majors and may not be counted toward the International Dance Studies Certificate.  All other students interested in a general survey of international dance, please enroll in Dance Appreciation Online.

Graduate Courses

07:207:405 Motor Learning and Control for Dance Pedagogy

Motor Learning and Control for Dance Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:207:405

Designed to provide students an overview of theories and practice in motor learning, concepts, and principles that relate to the acquisition and relearning of motor and movement skills.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:206:532
Course Corequisites: Required for students seeking teacher certification in dance and/or EdM in dance education.

Learning Goals of Course:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the basics of motor learning, motor control, and motor development and how they can be applied to dance education.
  • Identify how memory impacts learning and apply this knowledge to instructional techniques.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of developmental stages through the creation and implementation of a lesson plan for a codified dance technique.
  • Know the stages associated with learning and how they affect development in dance training.
  • Compare and contrast the best ways to practice a motor skill within a dance specific environment.
  • Define the different types of feedback and which is most effective to learn motor skills.
  • Explain the developmental progression for the C-I (conditioning with imagery) training system and apply to a dance class to enhance motor learning and skill acquisition.
  • Implement and analyze the use of somatic practices and conditioning programs focused on motor learning and development within the dance curriculum to reduce the risk of injury and improve.

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Students will be involved in class lectures, discussions, and movement laboratories that examine and apply these principles.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading:

Students will be assessed on the following:

  • Reading responses
  • C-I Training Application
  • Final Individual Project
  • Final Co-Teaching Project
  • Individual Summative Review

Instructor: Hollie Palmisano, hollie.palmisano@rutgers.edu

08:207:406 Introduction to Curriculum Assessment and Design

Introduction to Curriculum Assessment and Design

Course Number: 08:207:406
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face​

Introduce basic concepts of planning, instruction and assessment necessary for the development of PK-12 dance curricula that are culturally inclusive and aligned with New Jersey educational standards. Students will be guided in developing PK-12 dance yearlong plans, specific school community, and their own teaching visions.

3 credits

Instructor: DeAngelo Blanchard, db1446@mgsa.rutgers.edu

08:207:407 Dance Technique Pedagogy

Dance Technique Pedagogy

Course Number: 08:207:407
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Introduces students to developing theoretical knowledge and practicing essential pedagogic skills for teaching developmentally appropriate dance technique classes for children and adolescents in PK-12 education. Students will learn to situate lesson planning within movement theory, educational standards, artistic traditions, and backward planning, and to scaffold movement principles to help diverse learners achieve shorter- and longer-term educational and artistic goals.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course: Artists-teachers will effectively plan technique and pedagogic process learning in dance for PK-12 students

07:206:408 Creative Dance and Choreography Pedagogy

Creative Dance and Choreography Pedagogy

Course Number: 07:206:408
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Students will examine pedagogical issues and methods for planning, teaching, and assessing creative dance, dance improvisation, dance-making, and responding to dance across a range of learner development and English language learners and as appropriate for PK-12 urban learning settings.

3 credit(s)

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites: None

Learning Goals for Course:

Teachers will:

  • Examine and apply classroom management supports for creative process learning in dance.
  • Effectively plan creative process learning in dance for PK-12 students.
  • Effectively facilitate creative process learning in dance.
  • Know and use methods for collaboration, reflection and peer-assessment.
08:207:502 Embodied Dance History Pedagogy

Embodied Dance History Pedagogy

Course Number: 08:207:502
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

The course content focuses on historically significant traditions in dance education and the ways in which they can inform pedagogic strategies that illuminate and clarify dance in urban education. Students will examine pedagogical issues and methods for planning, teaching, and assessing dance technique across a range of learner development as appropriate for PK-12 urban education settings.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Identify cultural and historical dance education content arising out of embodied pedagogic practice
  • Trace how six artist-educators were situated within their historical era and what cultural, political, and social movements influenced their pedagogy and artistry Examine the six artist-educators’ beliefs about, and strategies for, the teaching and learning of dance–and understand the lesson planning, preparation, instruction and assessment that these beliefs and strategies necessitated
  • Use arts standards creative processes (creating, performing/presenting/producing, responding, connecting) as a lens to engage with cultural and historical dance
08:207:510 Intro. to Research in Dance Education

Intro. to Research in Dance Education

Course Number: 08:207:502
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face

Aims to engage students in developing introductory knowledge and skills for discerning, reviewing, and conducting qualitative research data collection in educational dance contexts. Students will explore various elements of research inquiry such as narrowing researching questions, searching, skimming and scanning literature, developing critical annotations, and examining various data elicitation methods.

3 credits

Learning Goals of Course: The abilities to review, analyze, critique, interpret, apply and generate research are at the core of teaching practice and enable teachers to transform their pedagogy.  Such abilities allow dance educators to make new discoveries as well as challenge and shed inherited assumptions about the teaching and learning of dance, thus informing curriculum development and instructional approaches used in professional practice.  The purpose of this course is to develop those abilities in students and also prepare students for eventual doctoral study.

Required and Recommended Course Materials

  • Ridley, D. (2012). (SECOND EDITION) The Literature Review: A Step-by-Step Guide for Students.  Los Angeles: Sage. 
  • Tracy, S. (2020).  (SECOND EDITION) Qualitative Research Methods: Collecting Evidence, Crafting Analysis, Communicating Impact.  Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Policies for Exams, Assignments, Attendance, and Grading: Class participation, proposal chapter submission, oral presentation, research terminology exam

Instructor: Lisa Jo Sagolla, ls1079@rutgers.edu

08:207:511 Leadership in Dance Education

Leadership in Dance Education

Course Number: 08:207:511
Course Format: Lecture
Mode of Instruction: Face-to-Face​

This course introduces leadership concepts and program planning as it applies to directing dance programs in PK-12 schools and other settings. It will examine the interrelationships between curriculum, programming, and service and the development of professional career materials that demonstrate leadership potential. During this seminar-based course, students will engage in activities such as examining critical contemporary issues in PK-12 education, examining case studies, developing strategic employment materials, and examining the leadership responsibilities of dance educators. This course will draw upon the student’s prior knowledge of EdM courses, including instructional planning and educational technology, to successfully complete course assignments and projects.

3 credits

Course Prerequisites: 07:207:405G; 07:206:402G;07:2307:406G;07:207:407G;07:207:408G

Learning Goals of Course:

  • Define leadership and identify leadership that affirms principles of social justice
  • Identify personal leadership traits and strengths and their implications for program direction; Differentiate between the strategic purposes of various professional documents and the information they provide (vitas, resumes, cover letters and bios, etc.) and strategically shape communications to demonstrate leadership potential
  • Strategically prepare for interviews
  • Examine and discuss current educational trends in-service teachers will need to engage with in their school communities
  • Assess their positionality on these trending topics consistent with their pedagogic identity and values and in relationship to educational policy

Required and Recommended Course Materials: Campbell, D.; Melenyzer, B.; Nettles, D.; Wyman, R. (2014). How to Develop a Professional Portfolio: A Manual for Teachers (6th Edition). Pearson

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