08:702:577: History of the Western Canon for Graduate Music Education Online (Graduate History)

This course is a chronological music history survey encompassing all eras of western music history, from c. 1000- 1950. We will study the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which music was composed and performed, focusing primarily on art music in Europe and the United States. We will examine the stylistic features, forms, and performance practices typical of each era, and how these relate to the wider context of the time. We will discuss how these features evolved over time, and how this evolution was conditioned by the changing context and expressive goals of composers and performers. Finally, we will place the music in the context of other contemporaneous artistic movements.

This course has been designed to meet two goals: 1) to allow students to study and discuss major works in the Western art music canon and 2) to allow students to study and discuss works of an appropriate level for the students they teach. Accordingly, each unit will have two components: study and discussion of the works listed on this syllabus, followed by study and discussion of works chosen and presented by the students in the class.   

Students will engage with the material in the following ways:

1)      Through required reading and listening assignments

2)      By listening to and/or watching mini-lectures intended to provide background to the material under discussion that week

3)      By participating in a class blog both as a primary author and as a respondent (see below for details and requirements)

4)      Through regular and active participation in threaded discussion forums intended as an informal site of conversation between the students and instructor (see below for details and requirements)

Through the creation of content modules (including, e.g., mini-lectures, podcasts, or narrated PowerPoint presentations), in which students will apply the knowledge gained from the reading, listening, and lectures to their own teaching curricula.