music

Music Technology

Music Technology at Mason Gross (MTMG) is part of the music department at the Mason Gross School of the Arts. It explores the intersection of music and technology in the areas of creativity, education, and performance. The program fosters research in emerging technologies and technology-based performance practice, and it provides students the technical skills they need to succeed as professional musicians in the 21st century. Courses are offered in recording arts, digital audio composition, electronic music history, interactive music and instrument design.

Facilities include the Sharon A. Fordham Multimedia Lab Classroom, located in the Mabel Smith Douglass Library, and the Robert E. Mortensen Hall Technology Suite and Recording Studio.

Programs

Faculty

Steven Kemper

COMPOSITION / MUSIC THEORY / MUSIC TECHNOLOGY / MUSICOLOGY STATEMENT OF VISION

The musicology, music theory, composition and music technology programs of the Mason Gross School of the Arts cultivate the study and creation of music through engagement with current methodologies in—and innovative approaches to—research and composition. We seek to foster a vibrant environment of intellectual curiosity, creativity and collaboration, in which faculty and students of varied backgrounds may explore together the theory and practice of music throughout history and within contemporary culture. Our classes, concerts, lectures, conferences and workshops build upon our position both within a professional conservatory setting and as part of the broad, humanistic environment of a major research university. We encourage the development of ideas about music through the application of traditional and non-traditional methods, interdisciplinary approaches, emerging technologies and especially critical thinking and writing. Serving a community of performers, composers and scholars, we promote inquiry into music of the past and the present, and the development of a vision for music in the future.

Watch this video about a recent symposium on automata from the early-modern period to today: