music

Christopher Doll

Associate Professor, Composition, Music Theory

Associate Professor Christopher Doll is a theorist-composer specializing in recent popular and art music, particularly in tonality and intertextuality. He earned degrees at Columbia University (PhD with distinction, 2007), the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (MM, 2000), and Case Western Reserve University (BA, 1998). He was a graduate council fellow at Stony Brook University from 2000-2002.

Prior to his arrival at Rutgers in 2007, Doll led courses at all of his graduate institutions and served additionally for four years as an instructor of popular music in the Barnard College Pre-College. In 2008, he was a fellow at the “Jazz Meets Pop” Mannes Institute for Advanced Studies in Music at the Eastman School of Music, where he also received the Miles Levin Musical Essay Award. His other awards include the Graduate School of the Arts and Sciences Endowment Fellowship from Columbia University and the Society for New Music's Brian M. Israel Prize for his piano piece “Borrowed Time.”

Doll’s monograph, Hearing Harmony: Towards a Tonal Theory for the Rock Era, is forthcoming from the University of Michigan Press. His articles and reviews have covered topics ranging from “Louie Louie” to Milton Babbitt, and have been published or are forthcoming in Music Theory Online, Music Theory Spectrum, Indiana Theory Review, Gamut, Journal of Music Theory, Dutch Journal of Music Theory, Popular Music, Popular Music and Society, Journal of Popular Music Studies, Journal of the Society for American Music and Notes. He has contributed entries to the Grove Dictionary of American Music (2nd ed.), the Encyclopedia of African American Music, and Music in American Life. He has delivered papers and/or chaired sessions for the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, the International Musicological Society, the Modern Language Association, the Music Theory Society of New York State, the Music Theory Society of the Mid-Atlantic and the American Musicological Society (Capital Chapter and Greater New York Chapter). He has spoken at institutions such as Oxford, Eastman, Princeton, Columbia, Northwestern, Penn, Cornell, the Conservatorium van Amsterdam, the Koninklijk Conservatorium (Antwerp), the Institute for Popular Music (Liverpool), and the Experience Music Project (Seattle). Recently, he gave the Spring 2014 American Musicological Society lecture at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum (Cleveland).

  • Expertise

    Composition/Theory