dance

Monica Frichtel

Monica Frichtel is an educator and researcher specializing in dance pedagogy, assessment, and curriculum. She teaches across diverse communities, seeking to engage in critical dialogue and practices that pursue a just and equitable society. She is also a performer and founded a community dance collective that attracts dancers, musicians, and visual artists. Originally from California, Frichtel graduated from the University of California, Irvine. After performing in the Bay Area for several years, she moved to Philadelphia to pursue graduate studies, earning both a PhD (2012) and EdM in dance (2005) from Temple University. Her dissertation, Freedom, transformation, and community: Student meanings of engagement in a dance-based general education course, examines meanings of student engagement. This research led her towards critical, feminist, and phenomenological pedagogical inquiry. At Temple she was awarded both the Edrie Ferdun Emerging Scholar Award (2012) and the Promising Dance Educator Award (2005).

She remains active with the National Dance Education Organization, regularly presenting at conferences, participating with Dance 2050 thinktank, and served a three-year term as co-editor of the conference proceedings (2008-2010). She was awarded the Bill Evans Award for Performance and Post-secondary Teaching in 2010. Her work has been published in multiple books and the Journal of Dance education.

Frichtel has over 15 years of experience teaching in higher education, in addition to experience teaching in K-12 schools and private studios. She currently teaches masters and doctorate level courses at Temple University and Rutgers University, while pursuing independent research. She has just completed a three-year, grant supported, program evaluation of a dance outreach initiative that serves Philadelphia public schools. This qualitative evaluation analyzed data collected from approximately students, classroom teachers, and dance artist-educators participating in the program. She has also recently completed a program curriculum review for a private college dance department.

Monica Frichtel’s interest in curriculum has led to opportunities developing coursework in two dance departments and a physical education teacher preparation program. As a doctoral student, funded by a grant, she collaboratively developed and received approval for a GenEd dance course, Embodying Pluralism, meeting criteria for the university’s new general education race-studies requirement. In addition to her collaboration of course development, she also received grant monies to develop a course research assignment connecting students to the local community, and participated in the 5-year recertification process.